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Grey "spots" in images

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December 27, 2004 3:49:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi All,

Today I went out and did some "landscape" photography. Many of the shots had
the sun setting from the right. I was using a 20D at 17mm f/22 without a
hood. Some of the shots had obvious lens flare.

The disturbing thing was that many of my shots (where the sun was not in the
frame), ended up with small grey "spots". If you consider say an 8x10 print,
the "spots" would be only 1-2mm in diamater. I dont know what these are.
They did not show up in my portrait shots where there was front-light. Is
this another type of lens flare?

If someone has experienced this please let me know. In the meantime I will
try to put an example image up somewhere - any recommendations of a free
site where I can share images??

Thanks
Musty.

More about : grey spots images

Anonymous
December 27, 2004 3:49:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

They are dirt on your imaging sensor. Clean it off with an air bulb or, if
absolutely necessary, very gently swabbing it with denatured alcohol and a
Q-Tip.
December 27, 2004 3:56:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"C J Campbell" <christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:E9OdnXe9QPOcwFLcRVn-ug@wavecable.com...
> They are dirt on your imaging sensor. Clean it off with an air bulb or, if
> absolutely necessary, very gently swabbing it with denatured alcohol and a
> Q-Tip.
>
>

Thanks for the suggestion. One question I have though, is that it does not
show up on all images eg candid shots at f/11 or portraits at f/4. Perhaps
more importantly, it does not show up if there is no bright light source in
front of or side of the camera. Also, my camera is only a couple of months
old and I change lenses very infrequently.
Related resources
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 3:56:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:55Jzd.23411$yv2.2206@fe2.texas.rr.com...
>
> "C J Campbell" <christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:E9OdnXe9QPOcwFLcRVn-ug@wavecable.com...
> > They are dirt on your imaging sensor. Clean it off with an air bulb or,
if
> > absolutely necessary, very gently swabbing it with denatured alcohol and
a
> > Q-Tip.
> >
> >
>
> Thanks for the suggestion. One question I have though, is that it does not
> show up on all images eg candid shots at f/11 or portraits at f/4. Perhaps
> more importantly, it does not show up if there is no bright light source
in
> front of or side of the camera. Also, my camera is only a couple of months
> old and I change lenses very infrequently.

They are typically only visible against things like the sky or large
expanses of a light color. Otherwise they get lost in the rest of the shot.
They are there, but you generally can't see them.

You only have to change lenses once to start getting them. Remove them
digitally until they get too annoying, then clean the sensor. They are a
fact of life with all dSLRs.
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 4:11:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:55Jzd.23411$yv2.2206@fe2.texas.rr.com...

> Thanks for the suggestion. One question I have though, is that it does not
> show up on all images eg candid shots at f/11 or portraits at f/4.

That's because the aperture is open wider, more light is hitting the sensor,
and the sensor doesn't pick up on them.

> Perhaps
> more importantly, it does not show up if there is no bright light source
> in
> front of or side of the camera.

This is because with low light your lens's aperture is open wider (see
above) and, in some cases, the subject you're shooting is dark anyway and
the dust blends in more easily.

> Also, my camera is only a couple of months
> old and I change lenses very infrequently.

This doesn't matter. Dust is going to get inside eventually.
December 27, 2004 4:23:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"C J Campbell" <christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:cradnT-659zT_lLcRVn-rw@wavecable.com...
>
> "Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote in message
> news:55Jzd.23411$yv2.2206@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> >
> > "C J Campbell" <christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:E9OdnXe9QPOcwFLcRVn-ug@wavecable.com...
> > > They are dirt on your imaging sensor. Clean it off with an air bulb
or,
> if
> > > absolutely necessary, very gently swabbing it with denatured alcohol
and
> a
> > > Q-Tip.
> > >
> > >
> >
> > Thanks for the suggestion. One question I have though, is that it does
not
> > show up on all images eg candid shots at f/11 or portraits at f/4.
Perhaps
> > more importantly, it does not show up if there is no bright light source
> in
> > front of or side of the camera. Also, my camera is only a couple of
months
> > old and I change lenses very infrequently.
>
> They are typically only visible against things like the sky or large
> expanses of a light color. Otherwise they get lost in the rest of the
shot.
> They are there, but you generally can't see them.
>
> You only have to change lenses once to start getting them. Remove them
> digitally until they get too annoying, then clean the sensor. They are a
> fact of life with all dSLRs.
>

Thats what I will have to do I suppose. Thanks.

A question on cleaning. If I use a bulb blower, doesn't that just blow the
dust into the body? Is that avoidable? It seems like its not a great idea to
have dust inside the body since it could attach itself back on the sensor.
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 4:23:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Musty wrote:
>
> Here is definitely one for the 35mm SLR owners as a "con" against
> DSLR...

Yeah but - with a DSLR you'll never leave a scratch the length of your
memory card because of grit on the pressure plate... ;^)
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 6:00:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:t_Izd.23381$yv2.84@fe2.texas.rr.com...
> Hi All,
>
> Today I went out and did some "landscape" photography. Many of the shots
> had
> the sun setting from the right. I was using a 20D at 17mm f/22 without a
> hood. Some of the shots had obvious lens flare.
>
> The disturbing thing was that many of my shots (where the sun was not in
> the
> frame), ended up with small grey "spots". If you consider say an 8x10
> print,
> the "spots" would be only 1-2mm in diamater. I dont know what these are.
> They did not show up in my portrait shots where there was front-light. Is
> this another type of lens flare?
>
> If someone has experienced this please let me know. In the meantime I will
> try to put an example image up somewhere - any recommendations of a free
> site where I can share images??
>
> Thanks
> Musty.
>

I've posted earlier of the same problem with my new Canon A75. Later I
googled for answers and found that the "gray spots" are called orbs. Some
said they are reflection from dust in the air. Some believe the orbs are
spiritual energies.

You can go to this site for more information:
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/h.cowell/orbs.htm

What do you think it is? The truth is out there.......
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 9:23:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

[...]

> Ok, so I decided to Google and try and answer my own question. Boy, did I
> open a can of worms. Sensor cleaning is obviously not something that has a
> clear answer. I ordered one of those Rocket blowers from B&H and I may
> cancel my order in the morning. Seems like using a blower can make extra
> dust-bunnies.
>
> I dont want to open another can of worms, but I would be interested to hear
> from 10D and 20D owners (or other owners with similar sized sensors) the
> following questions:
>
> 1) Have you ever tried to clean your sensor filter (note the sensor is not
> actually exposed)
> 2) If so, what has worked and what hasn't

[...]

As a 10D owner, I read about and have used the Copperhill method with
great success. Take your time, read the instructions (and follow them)
carefully and based on my experience, all will be well.

(Usual disclaimers apply.)

--
Anthony Ralph
Buckingham UK

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