Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

AMD vs Intel

Last response: in Systems
Share
August 9, 2010 9:03:09 PM

Hi all,

I tried to search for an updated thread that might answer my question, but with no luck, so if there is one, forgive this thread. I want to build a desktop somewhat on a budget, but I don't want to skimp on the motherboard. Basically, I'm happy to use a cheap CPU for now and upgrade in the future, but I'd like to get the best motherboard for my needs. Keeping this in mind, I have seen the Asus Crossfire IV and the Maximus Gene III (I'd ideally build an mATX machine). So ultimately, my decision comes to AMD versus Intel. With AMD, I can buy a cheap Athlon or Phenom II CPU for now, and then hopefully drop in a Bulldozer-based CPU or Phenom II X6 in the future, but with Intel I'm forced into a more expensive (up-front, at least) situation. As foolish as future-proofing is as a concept, do you think one of these scenarios would be better? Also, if I wanted an mATX build in either case, what mobo would you suggest? I do game, but it's only occasionally (SC2, Football Manager, etc), while most of my work will be regular/heavy multitasking and some engineering computation. This would be my first build, so I'm not really sure what I need to look for in a mobo, but I would like to at least have USB 3.0 support. Thanks for reading the long post and I appreciate any response!

Cheers.

More about : amd intel

August 9, 2010 9:18:05 PM

I wouldnt get a high end motherboard like that unless you are dropping in a high end processor to go with it. The higher end motherboards add some features, but most of them are primarily for overclocking and even a significantly cheaper board would still give you similar overclocking potential but would let you start with a stronger CPU for better performance in the end.

Rather than selecting each component individually i suggest filling out our little template, it will let us suggest a full and well balance system to you that will fit your needs well.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261222-31-build-advic...
m
0
l
August 9, 2010 9:22:20 PM

itmictc said:
Hi all,

I tried to search for an updated thread that might answer my question, but with no luck, so if there is one, forgive this thread. I want to build a desktop somewhat on a budget, but I don't want to skimp on the motherboard. Basically, I'm happy to use a cheap CPU for now and upgrade in the future, but I'd like to get the best motherboard for my needs. Keeping this in mind, I have seen the Asus Crossfire IV and the Maximus Gene III (I'd ideally build an mATX machine). So ultimately, my decision comes to AMD versus Intel. With AMD, I can buy a cheap Athlon or Phenom II CPU for now, and then hopefully drop in a Bulldozer-based CPU or Phenom II X6 in the future, but with Intel I'm forced into a more expensive (up-front, at least) situation. As foolish as future-proofing is as a concept, do you think one of these scenarios would be better? Also, if I wanted an mATX build in either case, what mobo would you suggest? I do game, but it's only occasionally (SC2, Football Manager, etc), while most of my work will be regular/heavy multitasking and some engineering computation. This would be my first build, so I'm not really sure what I need to look for in a mobo, but I would like to at least have USB 3.0 support. Thanks for reading the long post and I appreciate any response!

Cheers.

I DO NOT CARE WHAT PEOPLE SAY

ok, I would go with AMD its cheap and they have really good cpus, an overclocked 1090t/1055t beats an i7 930 easy, real cores! Intel sockets are a mess, everytime there is a new family of CPUs you have to buy a new motherboard, with AMD the AM2/AM2+/AM3 are all compatible and the new one AM3+ (they might call it) will be backwards compatible too. You should buy an AMD because bulldozer/fusion CPUs are coming next year, and will work on todays motherboards. The bulldozer cpus will blow sandy platform to hell. There are problems with sandy platform already, they are saying when you overclock everything else in your system changes.. on and on. AMD FTW! They make their own GPUs too, "ATi" AMD and ATi work very very very good together, much much closer bond than intel and nvidia.
m
0
l
Related resources
August 9, 2010 9:25:58 PM

I'll agree with hunter315's recommendation above to fill out the form.

Something to note is that Intel is replacing socket 1366 with socket 1365 next year, so in all likelihood, the current Intel processors are the last that are going to be released for socket 1366. AMD indicates that Bulldozer at least will work on AM3, though plans beyond that are unclear. The only realistic choice for system that you plan to upgrade the CPU on with today's info is AMD.

That being said, it really depends on what your requirements are. If you have high-end requirements now, you should probably just go with Intel and not worry about the long-term situation. If budget is more of a concern than performance right now, go with AMD and upgrade later when you have more free cash.
m
0
l
August 9, 2010 9:36:14 PM

Thanks guys, I did originally fill out the whole form a few days ago, but I think I may have put too much info in! I'll try it out again:

APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: asap

BUDGET RANGE: $800

SYSTEM USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: General multitasking, engineering computation, gaming, watching movies, listening to lossless music through high-end speakers (Swan M200MkIII)

PARTS NOT REQUIRED: Power Supply (OCZ Fatal1ty 550W Modular PS), HD (OCZ Vertex 2 60GB), CD Drive (LG 10X BD-ROM), RAM (OCZ Special Ops 4GB DDR3 1600)

PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS: anywhere is fine (US based)

PARTS PREFERENCES: I want the best mobo/CPU combination to be used in an NZXT Vulcan mATX case

OVERCLOCKING: Maybe

SLI OR CROSSFIRE: No

MONITOR RESOLUTION: 1920x1080

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: I was going to add an Asus Xonar DS sound card and a Radeon HD 5770 to the build, but suggestions are welcome!
m
0
l
August 10, 2010 3:24:16 PM

Any thoughts? Most of the threads in the forum are for primarily gaming computers, so any advice on a build with more emphasis on heavy multitasking and lossless-quality audio playback, as well as occasional gaming, would be great! (Sorry for the not-so-subtle bump)
m
0
l
August 10, 2010 4:32:33 PM

Normally I don't thank people for bumping, but in this case, thanks for waiting a reasonable amount of time and then reminding me that I haven't followed up. :)  (The 15 minute or 1 hour bumps are crazy.)

Are the sound card & graphics card included in the budget?

Depending on what games you play, the 5770 could be a tad weak at 1920x1080. You mentioned SC2 and Football Manager, which should be fine with the 5770.

Nice choice on the Vertex 2, that's really the best value at 60-64 GB right now. Onboard sound is really good these days, I'd recommend building without the soundcard and then adding it later if you find the onboard isn't working for you.

Assuming the soundcard isn't included, but the graphics card is included in the $800, here's what I'd go with:

Intel option
CPU - i7-930 - $290 (or $200 if you can drive to a microcenter)
Mobo - Asus Rampage III Gene - $225 - includes USB 3.0 & SATA 6.0 GB/s.
HSF - your choice from Frostytech's top "5" heatsinks - say $60-70
RAM - ideally with socket 1366, you want 3 sticks...but it appears the special ops only comes in groups of 2. If you can return the OCZ RAM still, look into this G.Skill PI series 1600 MHz CL7 6 GB kit for $160
GPU - Sapphire 5770 - $150
Total: $825 + sound card + HSF - cost of returned RAM? Or you could stick with 4 GB for now and the total is $665.

AMD option
CPU - AMD Phenom II X6 1090T - $296
Mobo - Gigabyte GA-880GMA-UD2H - $100 - 1090T support, USB 3.0, SATA 6.0 GB/s
HSF - your choice from Frostytech's top "5" heatsinks - say $60-70
RAM - existing OCZ Special Ops
GPU - Sapphire 5770 - $150
Total: $546 + sound card + HSF

I'd look at this comparison of the 1090T vs. an i7-920 (slightly slower, earlier version of the 930) and determine whether or not any of your applications perform better with one of the processors.

Going AMD is almost always going to be less expensive, as the X58 motherboards are not cheap. It's not necessarily going to provide best performance though, unless your applications are heavily multithreaded. This article is also fairly illuminating.
m
0
l
August 10, 2010 5:13:04 PM

Thanks coldsleep!

I'm leaning towards the AMD option because of Bulldozer possibly being backwards compatible with a motherboard I buy now. So while I do want to be able to get the most out of the system now, I'd like to spend more on a motherboard now, as a sort of investment for a future processor. Is that a bad idea? Would it be better to buy a cheaper motherboard now and then replace it in the future? That's really my big issue, since I do like the mATX options I would have with Intel CPUs, such as that Asus mobo you recommended. I wouldn't mind going with an LGA1156 mobo, but that would require total replacement should I want to upgrade in the future. Plus, the Asus enthusiast mobo's look like they have a premium sound chip built-in, versus the standard ones in other boards.

Thanks!

P.S. I can get to a Microcenter, and this weekend is tax-free weekend!

Also, what do you think of the Asus Maximus III?
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
m
0
l
August 10, 2010 5:33:25 PM

I'm not really a fan of socket 1156 for what you're looking at doing with the computer. It's great for a gaming build, but if you're going to be doing some high-end computational work, I think it'd be better to shoot for either 1366 or AM3 (though you could get an i7-860, I guess). You could, of course, get a cheaper processor than the 1090T (either a 1055T or an X4 955) for $100 less and then upgrade to Bulldozer.

Although I have a Crosshair IV myself, I really don't think the top-end motherboards are all that worthwhile for most people. If you think you'll find yourself using the additional features, it might be worthwhile, but for the most part, there's little difference in the overclocking capabilities between boards in a similar range.

Yeah, it's unfortunate that there aren't a whole lot of enthusiast AM3 mATX motherboards. This MSI motherboard is about as spendy as it gets at $130.

It's a difficult choice. :)  I was looking at a new build earlier this year and had decided on 1366 until it was announced that it was being discontinued in favor of 1365 next year...so I switched to an AM3 build, and if I need a processor upgrade, there's at least the option.

Really, either the i7-930 or whatever AMD option you go with should be fine. Even an i7-860 would be fine. It really depends on whether or not you value the ability to upgrade in the next year or two. Beyond that, it's quite possible that Bulldozer will be the last AM3-compatible chip, so in 3 years, if you need more power, it's probably going to require a rebuild no matter which way you go.
m
0
l
August 10, 2010 8:48:50 PM

I think I'm going to go with an AMD build for now, so I can potentially upgrade to Bulldozer next year. I like the Gigabyte board you linked before, but I'm still undecided between the X4 955, 965, and X6 1055t. The prices at Microcenter are $145, $165, and $200, respectively. I don't have much experience with overclocking, but I'd be open to doing it if it doesn't put too much extra load on my OCZ 550W power supply. Any thoughts on which CPU would give me the best performance for what I need?
m
0
l
August 10, 2010 8:49:40 PM

itmictc said:
I think I'm going to go with an AMD build for now, so I can potentially upgrade to Bulldozer next year. I like the Gigabyte board you linked before, but I'm still undecided between the X4 955, 965, and X6 1055t. The prices at Microcenter are $145, $165, and $200, respectively. I don't have much experience with overclocking, but I'd be open to doing it if it doesn't put too much extra load on my OCZ 550W power supply. Any thoughts on which CPU would give me the best performance for what I need?

X4 955 ;) 
m
0
l

Best solution

August 10, 2010 8:56:09 PM

I'd agree with Mr Pizza, the 955 is probably your best bet. The 965 runs a little faster, but since the 955 is unlocked, you can simply increase the multiplier in the BIOS for a simple overclock that matches the 965. Don't even need to add an aftermarket HSF for that minor an overclock.

The 1055T would be better for applications that are highly-multithreaded, but worse in day-to-day performance and for loosely-threaded applications (which is pretty much everything).

If you had no intention of overclocking, I'd say go with the 965, as it's not that much more.
Share
August 11, 2010 12:08:48 AM

Okay great, I think I'm gonna go with that Gigabyte mATX board and the X4 965 then. Thanks all for the help!
m
0
l
August 11, 2010 12:09:07 AM

Best answer selected by itmictc.
m
0
l
!