Dell JY167 Heatsink.

Hello, I have a E2160 with the temps going about 30/31 C during web surfing and all to about 43C-53 (usually only about 43C , hardly do I see 50+) during games.

I was wondering if I can cool a E5400, or all the way up to a E6300 or E8600 ?

The dell heatsink of course is what I'll have to use on the motherboard.
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More about dell jy167 heatsink
  1. All of those cpus have the same tdp, so yes, the cooler should be able to cool them adequately, though you first need to make sure your mobo supports those cpus. You should be able to find a cpu support list on Dell's site by looking up your model number.
  2. pepperman said:
    All of those cpus have the same tdp, so yes, the cooler should be able to cool them adequately, though you first need to make sure your mobo supports those cpus. You should be able to find a cpu support list on Dell's site by looking up your model number.



    All it says is Celeron, Pentium Dual Core , and Core2Duo's. no quads support (as I already knew that).

    Also will this be a good thermal paste to use ? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835100014
  3. That thermal paste will do fine. Could you link your system model number, or the mobo model number?
  4. I do like Arctic Silver products.
  5. pepperman said:
    That thermal paste will do fine. Could you link your system model number, or the mobo model number?


    Inspiron 530D.

    Eh.. I think it's like 0RY007 model.

    Will that product be conductive ? Should I worry about applying too much ?
  6. I think you might have to call Dell on this one: I couldn't find any conclusive support table stating whether or not that board will support 45nm Core 2's or not.

    As for the thermal paste, follow this guide: http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_application_method.html
  7. pepperman said:
    I think you might have to call Dell on this one: I couldn't find any conclusive support table stating whether or not that board will support 45nm Core 2's or not.

    As for the thermal paste, follow this guide: http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_application_method.html



    Dell tech said I could support a wolfdale as long as I have the latest BIOS. They went on to say that I should be able to cool a E5400. After that they tried to shaft me to come back to get a warranty or new computer instead.

    So I want to smear the stuff all over the heatsink and spread it around with a credit card. Then put a thin line across the actual CPU ?

    http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/appmeth/int/hl/intel_app_method_horizontal_line_v1.1.pdf
  8. You can probably get away without tinting it, but if you choose to, make sure you clean off any excess, as it will negatively affect the heat transfer capabilities if the paste layer is too thick.

    As long as you follow the directions, you should be fine. Good luck, and let us know how it goes.
  9. pepperman said:
    You can probably get away without tinting it, but if you choose to, make sure you clean off any excess, as it will negatively affect the heat transfer capabilities if the paste layer is too thick.

    As long as you follow the directions, you should be fine. Good luck, and let us know how it goes.


    This is starting to sound like a lot of work lol.
  10. It's not too bad, you should be fine. You're lucky you're using an s775 CPU; those don't have pins that you have to worry about breaking.
  11. pepperman said:
    It's not too bad, you should be fine. You're lucky you're using an s775 CPU; those don't have pins that you have to worry about breaking.


    Alright. So what do I need to do to know if I have 'excess to remove' anyway? Why am I putting some on the processor if I'm going to be putting some on the bottom of the heatsink ?
  12. The excess would be whatever is left over on the heatsink after tinting it, though technically you don't need to tint it; putting paste on the cpu is enough.
  13. pepperman said:
    The excess would be whatever is left over on the heatsink after tinting it, though technically you don't need to tint it; putting paste on the cpu is enough.



    Ok. So pretty much just smear off any that isn't stuck to the heatsink with a coffee filter, put a thin line in the middle and put it back on?

    What about temps I should be worried and not worried about? The people at dell forums said they see 50C on their E5400.
  14. If its higher than ~65C or so under full load (i.e. prime95), you might have a problem, and you should try reseating the heatsink.
  15. pepperman said:
    If its higher than ~65C or so under full load (i.e. prime95), you might have a problem, and you should try reseating the heatsink.



    Ok so anything under 65 while playing games, etc it'll do ok ?
  16. Ya; the max temp of the chip is really 74, but its good to give yourself some buffer room
  17. pepperman said:
    Ya; the max temp of the chip is really 74, but its good to give yourself some buffer room


    Alright. I used Prime85 for about 6 mins on my current system.

    The speeds of the fan went up to 3154 RPMs and I could start to hear them for the first time ever besides boot up. Then the cores went up to 46C each. Soon as I stopped the test it dropped down to 33 C almost instantly and the speeds went back around the same speeds I've seen for the 2+ years. Which is in the range of 1730 RPMs.
  18. You should let it run for at least 30 min to get an accurate reading, but so far, those temps sound fine.
  19. pepperman said:
    You should let it run for at least 30 min to get an accurate reading, but so far, those temps sound fine.


    I couldn't really stand the sound of the fans for that long lol. But at 10 mins it was dropping down from the 3,200 back in to the 2,600 RPM range and still holding them about 46C each core. Then it'd go up and down the RPM ranges.

    I just hope I don't have it spinning at a loud noise I could start to notice at 2,200+.
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