Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

800x600 screen on a laptop

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
Share
December 3, 2004 3:41:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops,uk.comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Just curious, does anyone know why you have a very bad pixallised screen and
fonts on a laptop LCD screen when you put it into 800x600 and use the
'stretch' mode but its fine when its in 1024x768. On a normal CRT screen
with a desktop PC you can select 800x600 and not get this effect. Is it
because of the pixel arrangment on the LCD display or is it a poor graphics
processor design - in any case why can there not be built in
hardware/software to 'smooth' the fonts and Icons in 800x600 mode. The only
reasion is that I have a load of 800x600 jpegs to view on the laptop. I
could resize them to 1024x768 I suppose but that will increase their MB
size. The only other thing I can do is turn off the 'Screen expand' in the
BIOS of the laptop but then the photos dont fill the whole laptop screen.

Also why dont the laptop LCD screens have settings for Height and Width
brightness and contrast controls like CRT monitors? - or is there some
laptops out there with these settings on?


Andy.






---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.804 / Virus Database: 546 - Release Date: 01/12/2004

More about : 800x600 screen laptop

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 3, 2004 3:48:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops,uk.comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Andy" <andy@gofree.ie> wrote in news:319r1mF37nmvhU1@individual.net:

> Just curious, does anyone know why you have a very bad pixallised
> screen and fonts on a laptop LCD screen when you put it into 800x600
> and use the 'stretch' mode but its fine when its in 1024x768. On a
> normal CRT screen with a desktop PC you can select 800x600 and not get
> this effect. Is it because of the pixel arrangment on the LCD display
> or is it a poor graphics processor design - in any case why can there
> not be built in hardware/software to 'smooth' the fonts and Icons in
> 800x600 mode. The only reasion is that I have a load of 800x600 jpegs
> to view on the laptop. I could resize them to 1024x768 I suppose but
> that will increase their MB size. The only other thing I can do is
> turn off the 'Screen expand' in the BIOS of the laptop but then the
> photos dont fill the whole laptop screen.

For these LCD displays, you need to use the native resolution. For my
15" display, that is 1024X768. The native resolution is what the display
is designed to be set at, and selecting other resolutions results in such
reduced quality.

> Also why dont the laptop LCD screens have settings for Height and
> Width brightness and contrast controls like CRT monitors? - or is
> there some laptops out there with these settings on?

My Dell Inspiron 2650 does have key combinations that set brightness.

--
Tom McCune
My PGP Page & FAQ: http://www.McCune.cc/PGP.htm
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 3, 2004 12:15:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops,uk.comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

All laptops have a "native" resolution which should be set in Control panel
in order to get the correct picture size and resolution.

CRT dsiplays are made on a different principle. They don't have one single
resolution, but rather a range of available resolutions. Also, the contrast,
which is fixed on a constant-voltage TFT panel, can be varied on a CRT
monitor. The brightness is controllable on most modern TFT panels, and on
all CRT displays. Screen size on CRT monitors is variable in almost every
conceivable direction, whilst on a TFT panel,it is usually fixed.

A 12" TFT laptop screen had, until a few years ago, a native resolution of
800 by 600, and your Jpegs would have looked fine on one of these. As laptop
screens got bigger, the makers went for more detail by increasing the native
resolution, and naming the panels SVGA, XGA, SXGA, UXGA and so on.

You can buy a TFT 12" 800 by 600 laptop for about 80 quid these days, and
that would be your best bet if viewing these pictures is so important to
you. The Toshiba range of this vintage are still in superb condition, built
like batteships, and have superb screens ( look for the suffix CDT after the
model number). I know of several owners who will not part with their old
Toshibas, no matter what modern laptop wonder you wave at them, and a good
'un is worth keeping as a spare!

--
Remove "nospam" from return address.
"Andy" <andy@gofree.ie> wrote in message
news:319r1mF37nmvhU1@individual.net...
> Just curious, does anyone know why you have a very bad pixallised screen
and
> fonts on a laptop LCD screen when you put it into 800x600 and use the
> 'stretch' mode but its fine when its in 1024x768. On a normal CRT screen
> with a desktop PC you can select 800x600 and not get this effect. Is it
> because of the pixel arrangment on the LCD display or is it a poor
graphics
> processor design - in any case why can there not be built in
> hardware/software to 'smooth' the fonts and Icons in 800x600 mode. The
only
> reasion is that I have a load of 800x600 jpegs to view on the laptop. I
> could resize them to 1024x768 I suppose but that will increase their MB
> size. The only other thing I can do is turn off the 'Screen expand' in the
> BIOS of the laptop but then the photos dont fill the whole laptop screen.
>
> Also why dont the laptop LCD screens have settings for Height and Width
> brightness and contrast controls like CRT monitors? - or is there some
> laptops out there with these settings on?
>
>
> Andy.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
> Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
> Version: 6.0.804 / Virus Database: 546 - Release Date: 01/12/2004
>
>


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.798 / Virus Database: 542 - Release Date: 18/11/2004
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 3, 2004 12:50:06 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Tom McCune" <news1@DELETE_THISmccune.cc> wrote in message
news:UJOrd.28860$Uf.14445@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
> "Andy" <andy@gofree.ie> wrote in news:319r1mF37nmvhU1@individual.net:
>
> > Just curious, does anyone know why you have a very bad pixallised
> > screen and fonts on a laptop LCD screen when you put it into 800x600
> > and use the 'stretch' mode but its fine when its in 1024x768. On a
> > normal CRT screen with a desktop PC you can select 800x600 and not get
> > this effect. Is it because of the pixel arrangment on the LCD display
> > or is it a poor graphics processor design - in any case why can there
> > not be built in hardware/software to 'smooth' the fonts and Icons in
> > 800x600 mode. The only reasion is that I have a load of 800x600 jpegs
> > to view on the laptop. I could resize them to 1024x768 I suppose but
> > that will increase their MB size. The only other thing I can do is
> > turn off the 'Screen expand' in the BIOS of the laptop but then the
> > photos dont fill the whole laptop screen.
>
> For these LCD displays, you need to use the native resolution. For my
> 15" display, that is 1024X768. The native resolution is what the display
> is designed to be set at, and selecting other resolutions results in such
> reduced quality.
>

Just to expand on your response a bit.

The LCD panel has discrete pixels in the display. In your case there are
1024 across the panel and 768 down. When you display a 1024x768 pixel
display, the image pixels are mapped one for one with the screen's pixels
and a sharp display results.

When you change the resolution to 800x600 and stretch it, this one to one
correspondence no longer occurs and the graphics driver (or the display
itself) interpolates the image pixels to the display and because this cannot
occur precisely, the image appaers slightly blurred with no sharp edges.

In the case of a CRT display, there are no discrete pixels on the display.
The CRT will display whatever resolution image it is fed. The CRT display
is not as sharp as a LCD display at its native resolution, but remains
equally unsharp at all resolutions. It should be noted that CRT displays
are more prone to flicker at lower refresh rates. Although increasing the
refresh rate reduces the problem, it does so at the expense of image
sharpness. Most LCD panels will deliver a flicker free image even at a 60Hz
refrsh rate.

Ian.
December 3, 2004 5:30:30 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thanks Ian that was interesting. At least I know a bit more about them now.

Sometimes I still have to be convinced about these LCD Displays. Yes it is
great about saving space, being sharp and no flicker but most of them you
have to view at a certain angle and looking sideways the image almost
disapears and when watching fast moving objects there is a lag effect.

I wonder if we will ever see one day Plasma screens of 15" to 21" being
utilised into desktop and laptop PC systems - what do you reckon?




"Electrik Fan Club" <ian.shorrocks@baeyourclothessystems.com> wrote in
message news:41b03518$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
>
> "Tom McCune" <news1@DELETE_THISmccune.cc> wrote in message
> news:UJOrd.28860$Uf.14445@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
> > "Andy" <andy@gofree.ie> wrote in news:319r1mF37nmvhU1@individual.net:
> >
> > > Just curious, does anyone know why you have a very bad pixallised
> > > screen and fonts on a laptop LCD screen when you put it into 800x600
> > > and use the 'stretch' mode but its fine when its in 1024x768. On a
> > > normal CRT screen with a desktop PC you can select 800x600 and not get
> > > this effect. Is it because of the pixel arrangment on the LCD display
> > > or is it a poor graphics processor design - in any case why can there
> > > not be built in hardware/software to 'smooth' the fonts and Icons in
> > > 800x600 mode. The only reasion is that I have a load of 800x600 jpegs
> > > to view on the laptop. I could resize them to 1024x768 I suppose but
> > > that will increase their MB size. The only other thing I can do is
> > > turn off the 'Screen expand' in the BIOS of the laptop but then the
> > > photos dont fill the whole laptop screen.
> >
> > For these LCD displays, you need to use the native resolution. For my
> > 15" display, that is 1024X768. The native resolution is what the
display
> > is designed to be set at, and selecting other resolutions results in
such
> > reduced quality.
> >
>
> Just to expand on your response a bit.
>
> The LCD panel has discrete pixels in the display. In your case there are
> 1024 across the panel and 768 down. When you display a 1024x768 pixel
> display, the image pixels are mapped one for one with the screen's pixels
> and a sharp display results.
>
> When you change the resolution to 800x600 and stretch it, this one to one
> correspondence no longer occurs and the graphics driver (or the display
> itself) interpolates the image pixels to the display and because this
cannot
> occur precisely, the image appaers slightly blurred with no sharp edges.
>
> In the case of a CRT display, there are no discrete pixels on the display.
> The CRT will display whatever resolution image it is fed. The CRT display
> is not as sharp as a LCD display at its native resolution, but remains
> equally unsharp at all resolutions. It should be noted that CRT displays
> are more prone to flicker at lower refresh rates. Although increasing the
> refresh rate reduces the problem, it does so at the expense of image
> sharpness. Most LCD panels will deliver a flicker free image even at a
60Hz
> refrsh rate.
>
> Ian.
>
>
>


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.804 / Virus Database: 546 - Release Date: 30/11/2004
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 3, 2004 5:30:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Andy" <andy@gofree.ie> wrote in news:31bbjnF38ciovU1@individual.net:


> Sometimes I still have to be convinced about these LCD Displays. Yes
> it is great about saving space, being sharp and no flicker but most of
> them you have to view at a certain angle and looking sideways the
> image almost disapears and when watching fast moving objects there is
> a lag effect.

Not to mention colour accuracy. If you do prepress stuff or depend on
colour calibration, CRT is still the way to go.

- j
December 3, 2004 5:44:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops,uk.comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>Also, the contrast,
> which is fixed on a constant-voltage TFT panel, can be varied on a CRT
> monitor. The brightness is controllable on most modern TFT panels, and on
> all CRT displays.

Funny enough I was just playing around with my laptop last night and went
into the graphics display properties and adjusted the 'Gamma Control'
sliders and that allowed me to adjust the contrast/brightness of my LCD
panel which is good as the laptop does not seem to have any buttons on it to
adjust brightness/contrast so this would be the next best thing.

I have my home desktop PC set to 800x600 high colour 85hz all the time and
it seems perfectly sharp to me mind you its only a Dell 15" CRT monitor but
again, for me 15" seems big enough (!!) and takes up less space so why go
for more?? (unless you are doing Autocad etc.. I suppose) Oh, the days when
I used to work on a 14" (13" Viewable) CRT Monitor fine with 512kb video
memory and 256 colors, 60Hz and windows 3.1 & DOS :-)


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------

"Dennis Pogson" <dennisnospam_pogson@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:19Wrd.88$J27.70@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
> All laptops have a "native" resolution which should be set in Control
panel
> in order to get the correct picture size and resolution.
>
> CRT dsiplays are made on a different principle. They don't have one
single
> resolution, but rather a range of available resolutions. Also, the
contrast,
> which is fixed on a constant-voltage TFT panel, can be varied on a CRT
> monitor. The brightness is controllable on most modern TFT panels, and on
> all CRT displays. Screen size on CRT monitors is variable in almost every
> conceivable direction, whilst on a TFT panel,it is usually fixed.
>
> A 12" TFT laptop screen had, until a few years ago, a native resolution of
> 800 by 600, and your Jpegs would have looked fine on one of these. As
laptop
> screens got bigger, the makers went for more detail by increasing the
native
> resolution, and naming the panels SVGA, XGA, SXGA, UXGA and so on.
>
> You can buy a TFT 12" 800 by 600 laptop for about 80 quid these days, and
> that would be your best bet if viewing these pictures is so important to
> you. The Toshiba range of this vintage are still in superb condition,
built
> like batteships, and have superb screens ( look for the suffix CDT after
the
> model number). I know of several owners who will not part with their old
> Toshibas, no matter what modern laptop wonder you wave at them, and a good
> 'un is worth keeping as a spare!
>
> --
> Remove "nospam" from return address.
> "Andy" <andy@gofree.ie> wrote in message
> news:319r1mF37nmvhU1@individual.net...
> > Just curious, does anyone know why you have a very bad pixallised screen
> and
> > fonts on a laptop LCD screen when you put it into 800x600 and use the
> > 'stretch' mode but its fine when its in 1024x768. On a normal CRT screen
> > with a desktop PC you can select 800x600 and not get this effect. Is it
> > because of the pixel arrangment on the LCD display or is it a poor
> graphics
> > processor design - in any case why can there not be built in
> > hardware/software to 'smooth' the fonts and Icons in 800x600 mode. The
> only
> > reasion is that I have a load of 800x600 jpegs to view on the laptop. I
> > could resize them to 1024x768 I suppose but that will increase their MB
> > size. The only other thing I can do is turn off the 'Screen expand' in
the
> > BIOS of the laptop but then the photos dont fill the whole laptop
screen.
> >
> > Also why dont the laptop LCD screens have settings for Height and Width
> > brightness and contrast controls like CRT monitors? - or is there some
> > laptops out there with these settings on?
> >
> >
> > Andy.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
> > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
> > Version: 6.0.804 / Virus Database: 546 - Release Date: 01/12/2004
> >
> >
>
>
> ---
> Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
> Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
> Version: 6.0.798 / Virus Database: 542 - Release Date: 18/11/2004
>
>


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.804 / Virus Database: 546 - Release Date: 30/11/2004
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 6, 2004 12:41:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Andy" <andy@gofree.ie> wrote in message
news:31bbjnF38ciovU1@individual.net...
> Thanks Ian that was interesting. At least I know a bit more about them
now.
>
> Sometimes I still have to be convinced about these LCD Displays. Yes it is
> great about saving space, being sharp and no flicker but most of them you
> have to view at a certain angle and looking sideways the image almost
> disapears and when watching fast moving objects there is a lag effect.
>
> I wonder if we will ever see one day Plasma screens of 15" to 21" being
> utilised into desktop and laptop PC systems - what do you reckon?
>

Since a computer display is usually only viewed by one person from one
angle, I would think it unlikely to see a plasma computer display.

LCD technology is improving all the time, and I am of the opinion that it
will eventually displace plasma technology in large screen TVs.

Ian.
December 6, 2004 5:52:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> Since a computer display is usually only viewed by one person from one
> angle, I would think it unlikely to see a plasma computer display.
>
> LCD technology is improving all the time, and I am of the opinion that it
> will eventually displace plasma technology in large screen TVs.
>
> Ian.

I think it has a long way to go. I have many a time seen large screen TV's
in LCD Format and then look at Plasma and there is a huge difference in
picture quality and even with the technology they are using now for large
screen LCD Screens the picture is still bad when watching fast moving scenes
I think.




"Electrik Fan Club" <ian.shorrocks@baeyourclothessystems.com> wrote in
message news:41b4279a$1_1@baen1673807.greenlnk.net...
>
> "Andy" <andy@gofree.ie> wrote in message
> news:31bbjnF38ciovU1@individual.net...
> > Thanks Ian that was interesting. At least I know a bit more about them
> now.
> >
> > Sometimes I still have to be convinced about these LCD Displays. Yes it
is
> > great about saving space, being sharp and no flicker but most of them
you
> > have to view at a certain angle and looking sideways the image almost
> > disapears and when watching fast moving objects there is a lag effect.
> >
> > I wonder if we will ever see one day Plasma screens of 15" to 21" being
> > utilised into desktop and laptop PC systems - what do you reckon?
> >
>
> Since a computer display is usually only viewed by one person from one
> angle, I would think it unlikely to see a plasma computer display.
>
> LCD technology is improving all the time, and I am of the opinion that it
> will eventually displace plasma technology in large screen TVs.
>
> Ian.
>
>
>


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.805 / Virus Database: 547 - Release Date: 03/12/2004
!