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Case Fans

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November 1, 2010 8:03:49 PM

Not sure about the proper placement for this thread, but here seemed as good as any. My new case (Antec lanboy air) came to me set up with all case fans pointed for intake. Most situations I've seen have a few intake and a few exhaust. the case walls are mesh so I dont think hot air will be trapped inside. I mostly just want some outside input on the concept of fully intake case fans other than the case manual stating " all fans point inward to create a positive air pressure inside the case keeping out heat and dust."

I'm not really having temp problems with the case so I haven't messed with anything. I'm mostly just curious to learn more about the fan orientation.

Does this theory seem sound? Or should a fan or two be flipped over to move air through the case?

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November 1, 2010 8:25:42 PM

This seems like a personal choice/experimental issue with your case. I have read a few articles and forums addressing this issue and people come out of the woodwork with diffrent answers. Like you said your case is not getting overheated right now so you are good. Does your case have any excess slots for fans to be added? Most come with at least one extra spot. If you are to add another I would make that an exhaust fan. My theory is lots coming in...lots going out. My case has 2 250mm fans going in. One 120mm for exhaust, as well as the PSU exhausting out and 2 GPU boths exhausting out the back.

If you have a temp sensor try some experiments running something bad a@# like Crysis or Metro 2033(Can bring my temps up by 5C in my case.) That will heat up your case fast. Sway a fan intake to exhaust and retry.

Good Luck
November 1, 2010 9:06:49 PM

my case currently has 5 120mm fans (1 rear, 2 side, 2 front) slots for 10 more which is over kill if you ask me. I plan on putting 2 more side fans. not because I need the cooling but because I'm slightly ocd when it comes to symmetry and 2 more will make it symmetrical.

I just didnt know if there was any truth to keeping it less dusty with all intake.
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November 1, 2010 9:16:09 PM

If it 'aint broke, don't fix it.
November 1, 2010 9:37:40 PM

do the fans have dust filters. If they don't having the positive air pressure won't mean a thing.
November 1, 2010 10:22:51 PM

They do not have dust filters. Would pressure even matter with all mesh walls on my case? I feel like it wouldn't build
November 1, 2010 11:39:11 PM

just looked up the case. Damn that is one unique case. You will always have positive air pressure if all fans are on intake though with that case it will not be much. But if there are no dust filters then having positive air pressure will not stop the dust as you.

The key with airflow is using positive airpressure is to keep the air directed. With you case I don't really see a way to control the direction of the air. The best I can suggest is this:

Keep the front and side fans as intakes and change the rear to an output. If you are going to add two more fans make them side fans as intake also. This is to try to keep the air flowing from front to rear.

I'm really curious to see what other people suggest as this is a very unique case.
November 2, 2010 12:52:03 AM

There will be no positive/negative air pressure. This is in effect an open case. All you need is fans blowing on components. There will be no trapped pockets from conflicting airflows becasue the extra pressure will just go out of the sides. I would be willing to gamble that that is the best way.

You do realise that you have to try it now with all the different combinations :) . Now you've started us going you have to test all the theories, surely? :) 
November 2, 2010 1:00:59 AM

Yes I know, I was close to embarking on a wild experiment all myself, but I thought I might check here first to see if anyone has tried the same thing. Is there a way to measure the actual case temperature? or do I just have to base it on the cpu temps.

And what are the thoughts on putting four intakes on the side and having front and back outputs?
November 2, 2010 1:03:34 AM

c_for said:
just looked up the case. Damn that is one unique case. You will always have positive air pressure if all fans are on intake though with that case it will not be much. But if there are no dust filters then having positive air pressure will not stop the dust as you.

The key with airflow is using positive airpressure is to keep the air directed. With you case I don't really see a way to control the direction of the air. The best I can suggest is this:

Keep the front and side fans as intakes and change the rear to an output. If you are going to add two more fans make them side fans as intake also. This is to try to keep the air flowing from front to rear.

I'm really curious to see what other people suggest as this is a very unique case.


The case is infact very unique. EVERYTHING can be moved and customized in whatever way you can hook it onto the small frame. When I took it out of the box I kind of stared shell shocked without knowing what to do.
November 2, 2010 1:42:00 AM

jacob0808 said:
Yes I know, I was close to embarking on a wild experiment all myself, but I thought I might check here first to see if anyone has tried the same thing. Is there a way to measure the actual case temperature? or do I just have to base it on the cpu temps.

And what are the thoughts on putting four intakes on the side and having front and back outputs?


You can also monitor GPU temps and system temps.
a b ) Power supply
November 2, 2010 3:31:52 PM

I fully agree with the case designers - keep ALL the fans as intakes. Why?

In the many discussions of how to arrange fans, I have always been of the opinion that the ideal situation is to have a nearly-sealed case with slightly more intake capacity than exhaust, AS LONG AS the intake fans all have dust filters. In that way you can be assured that any air flow through small case opening will be OUTWARD and prevent inflow of dusty air.

Forget all the arguments about hot air rising (that's ONLY of interest if there is VERY slow air flow, and you are deliberately trying NOT to have that!) or high-pressure air being more dense and a better heat carrier (just how much high pressure do you think we have here?). The key for cooling is air FLOW - the more the better - and to some extent WHERE the flow goes - you want it over the highest heat generators. And don't forget the unavoidable rule that what goes in must come out - the flow rate in is ALWAYS EXACTLY equal to the flow rate out.

There WILL be a pressure difference between the interior of your case and the outside air. Air only flows through an opening if there is a driving pressure difference. My preference, as I said, is that the interior be slightly higher so the flow is outwards. Emphasis there on SLIGHTLY. The pressure difference is so small it would take very sophisticated instrumentation to measure it. In fact, the better thing to focus on is air FLOW, and you can discern the DIRECTION of flow (and get some indication of velocity) by placing close to the case a source of some visible tracer like smoke. A good source suggested by others is an incense stick.

Yours is a very different case (OK, I couldn't avoid that pun). Your case is built with LOTS of openings everywhere. The fact that you have air intake fans guarantees that the air is being exhausted through all those openings, without any assistance from exhaust fans. The design is intended to ensure that air always flows out, thus reducing dust infiltration. However, I do agree with others that it would be preferable to have dust filters on those intake fans so dust does not get into your case by that route. A CAUTION, though: any dust filter will reduce air flow, so adding them to your system will reduce air flow and cooling. And that gets worse as the filters clog up, so remember to clean them! Check the temperatures on your CPU, mobo (case) and maybe video card (if it has a sensor you can read) both before and after installing any dust filters. (Most mobos have their own temperature sensor built in and often displayed as the "Case Temp", in ADDITION to the CPU's internal temp sensor.) If you feel the filters are causing temps to go too high, either remove them or consider adding more INTAKE fans with dust filters.
November 2, 2010 4:09:28 PM

Paperdoc, lots of good points and HOORAY for puns!

What is a better temp program. I am just using core temp right now, however if there is a program that will show me the temps on the other sensors as well that would be advantageous in all this testing.

So far though, with just checking the CPU temp, all intakes have not been making any difference in the temps as opposed to intake/exhaust setup.
November 2, 2010 11:04:41 PM

Thanks for the link. Does anyone have a suggestion on a CPU cooler? I was planning to install the hyper 212+ however I measured today and it wont fit in my case. What is a good heatsink that is a bit smaller than the 212+?
November 3, 2010 12:04:54 AM

The older freezer 7 pro rev 2 works for me. There are a lot better coolers available, but it depends how much you want to spend.
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