Photo Printers: Canon PIXMA iP4000 vs iP6000

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I am in the market for a new photo printer and have narrowed the choice
down to a pair of Canon PIXMA printers, the iP4000 and the iP6000.
Although the iP6000 has an LCD display and card slots, I probably won't
use them. So the ultimate decision comes down to photo quality. (The
printer will be primarily for photos, although I will use it to print
some text that does not need to be of any great quality.)

The iP4000 has 4 colors, while the iP6000 has 6 colors (additional
Photo-Cyan and Photo-Magenta). So, I was wondering if anyone had
compared the quality of the two printers. Is there any significant
difference in quality between the two? Do the additional colors help?
Do the additional colors increase or decrease the cost of ink?
Thanks for any help,
Jeff
6 answers Last reply
More about photo printers canon pixma ip4000 ip6000
  1. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    "Jeff" <jeffbachovchin@yahoo.com> wrote in message

    > The iP4000 has 4 colors, while the iP6000 has 6 colors (additional
    > Photo-Cyan and Photo-Magenta). So, I was wondering if anyone had
    > compared the quality of the two printers. Is there any significant
    > difference in quality between the two? Do the additional colors help?

    I purchase the iP6000D a couple of weeks ago after comparing prints
    from both at the store I purchased it from. My comparison was purely
    subjective but I felt that the color dynamics were better on the 6000
    and noticably less grainy. It is my opinion that the extra colors do help
    and the minor price difference between the two models make the 6000
    reasonably more attractive than the 4000 model. I am very satisfied with
    my purchase.

    > Do the additional colors increase or decrease the cost of ink?

    For a cost study on a 6 ink Canon printer you might find this i900D review useful -
    http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/digital/i900d.html
  2. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Ken, Thanks for the advice. The cost info was very helpful. I was
    leaning toward the 6000 and it sounds like it would be a good choice.

    Thanks again,
    Jeff

    Ken wrote:
    > "Jeff" <jeffbachovchin@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >
    > > The iP4000 has 4 colors, while the iP6000 has 6 colors (additional
    > > Photo-Cyan and Photo-Magenta). So, I was wondering if anyone had
    > > compared the quality of the two printers. Is there any significant
    > > difference in quality between the two? Do the additional colors
    help?
    >
    > I purchase the iP6000D a couple of weeks ago after comparing prints
    > from both at the store I purchased it from. My comparison was purely
    > subjective but I felt that the color dynamics were better on the 6000
    > and noticably less grainy. It is my opinion that the extra colors do
    help
    > and the minor price difference between the two models make the 6000
    > reasonably more attractive than the 4000 model. I am very satisfied
    with
    > my purchase.
    >
    > > Do the additional colors increase or decrease the cost of ink?
    >
    > For a cost study on a 6 ink Canon printer you might find this i900D
    review useful -
    > http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/digital/i900d.html
  3. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On 29 Dec 2004 12:45:35 -0800, "Jeff" <jeffbachovchin@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    >Do the additional colors increase or decrease the cost of ink?

    Jeff,

    one would first think that the additional colors cannot increase
    total ink cost, but they do, a bit. One reason is that the
    printer can and does print more than one color into one pixel,
    and the extra, light colors make it possible to mix more of
    them.

    Another is that the printer regularly cleans the print head and
    ink transport tubing by squirting some ink from each container
    into its waste sink. More ink containers mean more wasted ink.
    This effect is more pronounced when you print less.

    But altogether these effects are not very big. If you want the
    extra photo inks, go for the better printer. They improve
    lightly colored areas by having to use less dithering.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
  4. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Hans-Georg Michna commented courteously ...
    >
    >>Do the additional colors increase or decrease the cost
    of
    >>ink?
    >
    > Jeff,
    >
    > one would first think that the additional colors cannot
    > increase total ink cost, but they do, a bit. One reason
    is
    > that the printer can and does print more than one color
    > into one pixel

    [snip]

    Definitely, Hans. And, a printer has to convert from RGB
    to CMYK, to which there is no exact conversion, hence
    differences from one printer to another on the same pic
    (diff inks, also).

    All printers dither to fool the eye into thinking there
    are 16.7 million colors when there are really only 4
    (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black, unless the printer
    makes its own black).

    > But altogether these effects are not very big. If you
    want
    > the extra photo inks, go for the better printer. They
    > improve lightly colored areas by having to use less
    > dithering.

    When I have a choice in printers, given other factors such
    as quality, speed, paper size, etc., I go with the
    manufacurer that offers a cartridge for each color. This
    often varies with different models from the same
    manufacturer, as well.

    Over the years, that has proven most economical for me
    because, depending on the darkness/lightness and color
    balance of the printer, I always seem to "eat" either the
    black cartridge or the CMY cartridge prematurely.

    But, I wouldn't let the number of ink cartridges get in
    the way of my purchasing judgement. The other factors
    affecting the purchase of a printer, price included, are a
    lot more important unless you are on a very limited ink
    budget.

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry Rivers

    "Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm!" -
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

    "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately
    explained by stupidity!" - Hanlon's Razor

    Delete the reverse SPAM to reply by E-mail
  5. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 10:16:09 -0600, All Things Mopar
    <usenetMAPS123@comcast.net> wrote:

    >But, I wouldn't let the number of ink cartridges get in
    >the way of my purchasing judgement. The other factors
    >affecting the purchase of a printer, price included, are a
    >lot more important unless you are on a very limited ink
    >budget.

    ATM,

    I agree, with a small qualification. Total price seems to
    consist of a lot more ink money than printer money. And the
    Canon printers with separate ink tanks seem to be the most
    economical ones.

    I recently bought a Canon PIXMA iP3000 and am very happy with
    it. The thing costs barely more than $120 or so. In other words,
    I could throw it away and buy a new one every year or every
    other year.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
  6. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    One other question for anyone who has the 6000... how does the
    direct-from-card printing rate compared to printing from the computer?
    I've played with an HP that had a direct-from-card function, built-in
    LCD and such, and computer prints were a lot cleaner than "internal"
    prints of the same images...
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