Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Pentium D upgrade?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
November 7, 2010 1:03:02 PM

So my computer is fairly old, got it back in 2005 with these specs:

Motherboard: Gigabyte 8I945PL-G
CPU: Intel Pentium 4 640 3.20GHz
Memory: 4x512MB
Graphics: GeForce 9500GT (bought last year since the previous one burnt out)

I can't afford a new computer at the moment so I was thinking of upgrading to a Pentium D. Namely this:

http://www.outletpc.com/qf1129.html

But then I see Pentiums under CPU's to avoid on the buyers guide and "don't put any more money into that system".

So will I get any performance improvement with the Pentium D or is it really just a waste of money?

The upgrade is targeted at World of Warcraft: Cataclysm and the fact that I can't play 1080p videos on my computer.

More about : pentium upgrade

November 7, 2010 2:59:37 PM

Thanks for the advice! I hadn't considered replacing my motherboard, it's probably what I'm going to end up doing.
Related resources
a c 131 à CPUs
November 8, 2010 12:22:51 AM

SilverKey said:
Thanks for the advice! I hadn't considered replacing my motherboard, it's probably what I'm going to end up doing.

For sure. That pentium D is worth nowhere near $60.

That is a very nice motherboard for the price that rolli picked out. Here's some performance info on the architectures. The intel CPU I picked out was one of the last and most powerful dual core pentium based CPUs released. The Athlon I picked out is a slightly slower model than the 250:
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/93?vs=114

Note that your motherboard does not support the intel extreme edition CPUs as they were for early socket 775 motherboards that later on usually didn't support core 2 CPUs.

I'd also like to add that if you come across more money, this is a nice CPU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

But probably unnecessary. Especially since (someone correct me if I am wrong) WOW cannot utilize more than 2 cores.

Anyway, it is definitely the CPU holding you back. I used to have a 2.5GHz (overclocked) Athlon 64 single core and that used to hold me back. I could play come 1080p but once it got more intense, it failed me performance wise. Now I have an Athlon IIx4 620 that I got when they first came out.
a b à CPUs
November 8, 2010 4:19:06 AM

Wow doesn't have high requirements. My friend plays on an Atom D410. With that, you can't even launch CnC 3...
November 8, 2010 11:03:47 AM

amdfangirl said:
Wow doesn't have high requirements. My friend plays on an Atom D410. With that, you can't even launch CnC 3...


It doesn't indeed, but at the moment it can feel like I"m watching a slideshow when there's lots going on. I'll be going with one of the Athlons though depending on what I can find in stores. (Not Newegg though since I don't live in the US.)

Quote:
But probably unnecessary. Especially since (someone correct me if I am wrong) WOW cannot utilize more than 2 cores.


I'm not sure about that, but they recommended requirements is dual-core.

One question though, does CPU performance degrade over time or is that just a myth?
a b à CPUs
November 8, 2010 11:23:46 AM

SilverKey said:
One question though, does CPU performance degrade over time or is that just a myth?

That is a myth. CPU performance MAY seem to degrade over time, but this is mostly junk in the trunk of your OS. Clean up your operating system, and you will most likely "recover" that lost performance.

I would second the Athlon II/mainboard solution and reuse your memory. Good luck!
a c 131 à CPUs
November 8, 2010 1:52:50 PM

SilverKey said:
One question though, does CPU performance degrade over time or is that just a myth?


Yep. A myth. The OS degrades over time if not properly maintained. Even if it is, it often still degrades over time becoming sluggish. Takes a lot longer for that to happen if it is maintained.

Though, the CPU can degrade over time if the temperature is kept extremely hot over an amount of time. My friend had a radeon 4850. It still performs the same but the temperature increased over time. And, no, it was not dust or the like. The heat of 90-100*C for an extended period was not good for it.

This myth may also be caused by throttling. Often times people are not aware that their computer collects dust over time. In extreme cases, older computers will have a lot of dust buildup. This is insulation and leads to increased heat. If the CPU gets too hot, it will throttle to protect itself, lowering its own performance.
November 8, 2010 5:30:03 PM

I'll have to keep the heat issue in mind. Thanks for the replies!
a b à CPUs
November 8, 2010 5:47:14 PM

Follow best-practices when you attach your heat sink/fan. Use the thermal interface material sparingly, as it is only intended to fill the microscopic gaps between the heat sink and the heat spreader on your CPU.

Buy a case with good airflow or modify your existing case to force better airflow by adding more fans. Manage your cables to reduce their affect on airflow as well. Make sure that you keep your computer in an open, well-ventilated area. Most folks who have overheating problems keep their computers stuffed in a corner behind a door, and the box keeps cycling the same hot air over and over.

Clean the dust out of your computer at least once every 3 months. I have seen huge dust bunnies come crawling out of some of the most externally-clean systems. Folks just don't consider that the dust does build up inside of a computer when it moves that much air around.

Graphics cards present issues of their own. The best thing you can do is monitor your temperatures and make sure they are in line with common specs. If you see that isn't the case, then you can start taking measures (i.e., reseating the heat sink, replacing the TIM, RMA with the manufacturer, etc.) to resolve the problem.
!