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Buy New or Change...

Good day,

My RIG reboots itself and I have tested my HD, RAM, GPU and CPU all of it are fine, the only thing I'm worried about is my PSU.

So I opened my 3yr Old Silverstone St50F 500watts and I saw that it has capacitors bulging and it has leaked a little.

I would like to ask if should I change the capacitors myself or just buy a new 500-600watts PSU.


Current RIG:
Proc: Intel E5300 2.5GHz
GPU: 8800GT Sonic
HD: 1TB Seagate barracuda
RAM: 4x1GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2 800
MB: Asus P5Q
Cooler: Tuniq 120Xtreme


Your replies to my NOOB inquiry will be very much appreciated.


Thank you.
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about change
  1. Have you got a spare psu anywhere? or ask someone you know that has a sufficient power supply for your setup and try it and see if it reboots.

    Orrrr take it to your local shop and get them to test it.

    OR buy a new psu, best not to fork out the cash for one though when that might not even be the problem.
  2. tnx for the reply... I tried using my PSU to another Mainboard i monitored the voltages and the 12V kept on changing from 12.3-12.4v but when i changed the PSU with another the 12V stayed to a reading of 12.4v... is it possible that my PSU is busted...?
  3. Best answer
    If the capacitors on the PSU have leaked or busted open, then it does imply that you have a broken PSU.
    Currents in such situations are bound to fluctuate, it would be well advised to buy a new PSU but keep in mind other upgrades you might get into over the next year, so if you plan on upgrading later on in the year, get a PSU that supports 800W Plus of power.....
    If you are good with electronics and circuitry and a soldering iron, then after you buy a new PSU, you can always replace the burnt up , leaked capacitors with the same specs on the OLD PSU and keep it as a standby....
    :)
  4. Best answer selected by xoier.
  5. alyoshka said:
    If the capacitors on the PSU have leaked or busted open, then it does imply that you have a broken PSU.
    Currents in such situations are bound to fluctuate, it would be well advised to buy a new PSU but keep in mind other upgrades you might get into over the next year, so if you plan on upgrading later on in the year, get a PSU that supports 800W Plus of power.....
    If you are good with electronics and circuitry and a soldering iron, then after you buy a new PSU, you can always replace the burnt up , leaked capacitors with the same specs on the OLD PSU and keep it as a standby....
    :)



    Tnx for the very nice reply... you really gave me an idea in making my OLD psu as backup... Tnx again...
  6. This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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