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Best motherboard for my new i5 2500k

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July 8, 2011 9:58:13 AM

I am building a new computer and i just got a new i5 2500k today.My question what are the best new motherboards out today that support the i5 2500k.I have built my last 2 computers plus a few for friends.But its been awhile and havent been keeping up with whats hot & whats not.I have always used assus boards for my comps but so many out there now a days.I did read some info off a few site and forums but most people seem to like msi over assus.Anyways everytime I post a question on this site seems like I always get a good intelligent answer or opion.O'ya I almost forgot--I plan on using my comp for mostly watching video some editing alot of music alot of youtube some games but mostly dont play games on comp9got ps3).mostly music,editing,videos,pictures,downloading programs and whatnot.Thanks S.... :sol: 

More about : motherboard 2500k

July 8, 2011 5:02:00 PM

In my mind Asus makes the best boards for socket 1155. But before deciding what motherboard is best you need to think about what best means.

Which form factor do you want? (ATX, mATX, ITX, etx...)

Do you need Sata 6.0Gbps? USB 3.0? How many of each?

Do you going to run dual (or tri or quad) graphics cards (ever)?

Are you going to have a graphics card at all?

Are you going to be overclocking?

Are you going to be doing a lot of video encoding?

Do you need legacy connections (PS/2, IDE, etc...)

What other ports do you want/need (eSATA, Firewire, etc...) and how many of each do you need?

Do you need space for a sound card or Raid Controller or anything?

EDIT: And (duh) what's your budget?

Almost every mobo benchmarks within a few % of each other. The key differentiators are ports, pci-e slots, and to a lesser extent power regulation (for overclocking) and looks.

It's pretty hard to pick a motherboard for you without knowing more.
July 8, 2011 8:14:44 PM

Im actually not commenting on the main post but actually subasteve, im in the same predicament and maybe you could assist me.

My case can support any form factor
I need atleast 2 sata 6.0 for my hdd, and i have 2usb3.0, 4 usb2.0, and one firewire on the front panel of my case
I dont plan on using more than one video card
I will be using a high end graphics card
I want to overclock
Im unsure about video encoding or legacy connectionsn
Im open to any number of other ports
No need for sound card or raid controller
Trying to stay under $150
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July 9, 2011 8:24:37 AM

1996649,2,720176 said:
In my mind Asus makes the best boards for socket 1155. But before deciding what motherboard is best you need to think about what best means.

Which form factor do you want? (ATX, mATX, ITX, etx...)

Do you need Sata 6.0Gbps? USB 3.0? How many of each?

Do you going to run dual (or tri or quad) graphics cards (ever)?

Are you going to have a graphics card at all?

Are you going to be overclocking?

Are you going to be doing a lot of video encoding?

Do you need legacy connections (PS/2, IDE, etc...)

What other ports do you want/need (eSATA, Firewire, etc...) and how many of each do you need?

Do you need space for a sound card or Raid Controller or anything?

EDIT: And (duh) what's your budget?

Almost every mobo benchmarks within a few % of each other. The key differentiators are ports, pci-e slots, and to a lesser extent power regulation (for overclocking) and looks.

Thanks for reply I dident really think of about that (opps).Well ATX factor for sure and never ran dual video cards before,my current board asus P5W DH deluxe has option for dual cards and I never went that rout.I always thought that it was mostly for extreme gamers(witch I am not).So I guess only 1 video card PCI-E ofcourse.And I want to install a good sound card so I can utilize my 7.1 speaker system. I already (I have a sound blaster audigy 2 Z5 in my comp now)Probably get a new card because mine dosent work so well with windows 7.I have a serial hard drive already I can use for now but was thinking about getting solid state drive in the future.Raid option would be nice.USB-Firewire Ports I want.Overclocking I am not sure,my board now has a few options for overclocking but i never used.I was always told that not to overclock because it can *** my board up if I do it wrong.But always wanted to.So not sure if i need that option(what do think should I overclock or not).Raid option always a good to have.My budget-well I aint rich but I can spend 200 to 300 on a board.Less is always better but I dont want juke.Meaning if a 300 board is way better then 200 the i might get it.Thats why I wanted to ask someone that nows about boards,I dont want to spend 200 and find out later 250 or 280 would have got way better board.Or spend 300 and find out 200 board was just as good.I think i payed 260.00 for my board now (that was about 5-6 years ago).Anyways I appreciate your help hope all this makes sence & excuse my spelling dont have time to proof read got to go to help a friend in trouble.Thanks again..Sean
July 9, 2011 11:26:22 AM

If you plan on Crossfiring/SLI, choose an
ASUS p8p67 Deluxe.

It has the best CF/SLI results in term of FPS, while it is the mobo that consumes the least watt. IIRC, it is very cool aswell compared to the competition.
It's overclockability is very easy, and it can get great stable results.

That is what I am going for, anyways. Your priorities may vary.
July 9, 2011 3:17:36 PM

It seems like both of you (warpig23 and Aerandir) have the same requirements so the following advice goes for both of you (assuming you are both using an i5-2500k):

The cheapest board that I would recommend is the ASUS P8P67 LE (REV 3.0) at $130. It's a pretty solid board and it meets all of your requirements. (@Aerandir This board doesn't have an onboard USB 3.0 header. It only has two ports on the rear. I'm not sure which method your case's front ports use to connect.) It only has one full speed PCI-e slot so you'll never be able to use dual GPUs but if your usage model is always use a single high end GPU then it shouldn't be an issue. It also has UFEI which is a graphical BIOS interface which makes overclocking with a K-series chip fairly simple. You basically 1. Go into the UFEI, 2. Tick up the CPU multiplier, 3. Stress test, 4. Repeat until max stable overclock is reached.

If you wanted some more bells and whistles (Dual GPU capable, onboard USB 3.0 headers, 2 more SATA 6.0 ports) I would go with the ASRock P67 EXTREME4 (B3) at $160. Here's a Review.

If you wanted the the newest chipset (Z68), plus all the features of the previous board, I would go with the ASRock Z68 Extreme4 at $190. The biggest draw of Z68 is access to Quicksync which makes video encoding significantly faster.

After that you get way less bang for your buck. The ASUS Maximus IV Extreme-Z Z68 at $360 and the ASUS MAXIMUS IV EXTREME (REV 3.0) P67 at $350 are at the top of the heap. The ASUS SABERTOOTH P67 (REV 3.0) P67 at $205 is probably my favorite looking board.

Cheers
July 9, 2011 3:45:59 PM

i was researching mobos last night and it looks like the p8p67 pro evo and deluxe versions do come with a usb 3 ports on the internal i/o but thats stretching the affordability since the pro is $190 and the evo and deluxe are more than that. i do have to agree that the sabertooth is very appealing and if i could cut corners in any part of my build i would go for that one. Thanks for the input though, i never would of thought of ASRock boards as reliable since i havent heard of the brand until lately, but thats just me.
July 9, 2011 3:58:19 PM

ASRock is a spinoff of ASUS. They are fairly new but they've started to gain acceptance as a good alternative to more expensive brands. Their boards are generally well reviewed and fully featured. If money wasn't a factor I would probably take ASUS over ASRock every time but unfortunately when you wanna save money on a build....
July 9, 2011 4:03:23 PM

subasteve5800 said:
ASRock is a spinoff of ASUS. They are fairly new but they've started to gain acceptance as a good alternative to more expensive brands. Their boards are generally well reviewed and fully featured. If money wasn't a factor I would probably take ASUS over ASRock every time but unfortunately when you wanna save money on a build....


I agree, however, im looking for reliability and something that will not fail on me after a year or two, so if i need to spend an extra $50 for one that wont do that, i would be willing to. So far looking at any mobo thats under $150, theres positive reviews, but it also has its share of negative reviews with freeze ups and failures which definitely make me wary about them, no matter the brand.
July 9, 2011 11:36:27 PM

Hi, I'm also looking to learn more about motherboard features.

"Which form factor do you want? (ATX, mATX, ITX, etx...)
--->this has to do with size correct?

Do you need Sata 6.0Gbps? USB 3.0? How many of each?
--> sata 6.0 gbps is for hard drive speeds? what is standard? How many usb3.0 do you think is necessary/recommended?

Do you going to run dual (or tri or quad) graphics cards (ever)?
--> i want to run dual graphics cards, specifically crossfire, what features on the motherboard indicate that i am able? if i wanted to tr/quad (which i would never) what should i be looking for then?

Are you going to have a graphics card at all?
-->yes i will have my own graphics card so i don't need integrated graphics

Are you going to be overclocking?
---> absolutely, i5-2500k, what features are overclock friendly? how do you know which motherboards help in oc'ing?

Are you going to be doing a lot of video encoding?
--> not really, but what motherboard features aid in video encoding?

Do you need legacy connections (PS/2, IDE, etc...)
---> i hope not :p 

What other ports do you want/need (eSATA, Firewire, etc...) and how many of each do you need?
--> what uses eSATA and what uses firewire? i don't know much about peripherals but would like to know what uses eSATA/firewire. How many of each do you recommend?

Do you need space for a sound card or Raid Controller or anything? "
--> sound/raid controllers can be done through pci express slots no?
July 10, 2011 7:49:08 PM

@Patti88

Responses in order:

1. Yes, the form factor has to do with both the size of the motherboard and the placement of the mounting holes. You need to make sure your case is compatible with whichever motherboard type you choose.

2. SATA ports are used for connecting hard drives and optical drives. This is kind of confusing because there are two standards our now. There is SATA II which runs at 3.0 Gbps and there is SATA III that runs at 6.0 Gbps. Mainstream motherboards will have 2 SATA III ports and 4-6 SATA II ports. That's really all you need unless you run a ton of hard drives in a RAID. In which case a dedicated RAID card might be a better solution.

USB 3.0 is the newer, faster version of USB. There aren't a lot of devices out there that use this right now. Most boards will have two rear ports, higher end boards will also have an onboard header for two more, the top end boards can have 8 or more.

3. When you are looking to do SLI or Crossfire you need to find a motherboard that has at least two PCI-e 16x slots that can run at 8x/8x. Anything below that speed and the cards get bottlenecked. On LGA 1155 (the socket the 2500k fits) the PCI-e only has 16x lanes to the CPU so to run a tri or quad card setup you need a NF200 chip. This doubles the number of lanes so that each GPU can have at least 8 dedicated lanes. The NF200 also introduces some latency and bottlenecking. Tom's did an atricle about it a few months ago. To run tri or quad "naturally" you'd have to use a LGA 1366 (i7-9xx series socket) because they naturally have 32 lanes to the CPU.

3. The integrated GPU on the i5-2500k has one advantage over a dedicated GPU. When encoding video the iGPU can use something called Quicksync which greatly speeds encoding. Motherboards with a Z68 will give you access to the iGPU as well as support a dedicated GPU

4. To overclock a i5-2500k you need a motherboard with a P67 or Z68 chipset. K-series chips have unlocked multipliers which makes overclocking fairly simple. All you need to do is increase the CPU multiplier in the BIOS to the desired level. Motherboards with better power regulation will, in theory, allow for better overclocking but in reality almost any board will give you a moderate overclock (4.0-4.4Ghz) relatively easily and more agressive overclocks (4.5Ghz+) are probably unnecessary for an average user. Other than that, some motherboards (ASUS in particular) have more polished BIOS which makes settings easier to find.

5. As I mentioned above, a Z68 motherboard will gave you access to Quicksync which speeds video encoding.

6. Some gamers like PS/2 keyboards because the can register more simultaneous keystrokes.

7. eSATA is basically an external SATA port. They are generally used by some external hard drives. Firewire is an alternative to USB. Not a lot of things use it anymore. You generally find them on digital cameras and stuff like that.

8. That is correct. But remember two of your PCI-e slots are already going to be filled by graphics cards. You need to ensure that your board has an open 4x or 1x (depending on what you need) slot that isn't blocked by the GPU.

I think that's everything. Let me know if I missed something.

Cheers.
July 11, 2011 4:33:47 AM

Ty for all the information, it is greatly appreciated and not wasted :D 
!