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Fried Motherboard?

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July 8, 2011 6:42:10 PM

Sad story...

Okay, today I finished building my PC and when I went to turn it on, nothing happened and there was a green light on my mobo near the USB 2.0 port. I figured after a little research that is was the PSU. I have 3 fan cases and only 2 cords on my PSU that have the 4-pin connectors to plug into the fan slots on the mobo. At first I had the two biggest fans in the CHA_FAN1 slot which had 4 pins, and a single fan into the CHA_FAN2 slot which had 3-pins. I switched the fan connectors around and then when I turned on my computer again, everything seemed fine for about 5 seconds. Instantly i smelt smoke and I saw a wire in my mobo turn orange and travel down the mobo. I instantly turned off the pc and pulled out the power cord but the damage was done i believe. There are smoke marks on the mobo right next to my ram sticks and what seems to be a groove where it overheated. My question is... is it a dead motherboard now, or is there some way I can fix it... :( 

More about : fried motherboard

a c 108 V Motherboard
July 9, 2011 12:58:33 AM

If it was just the fan header, then chances are your mobo is still ok. To connect your two fans to one header, use this .
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July 9, 2011 2:03:43 AM

So if I had the two fans connected to one PSU cord, but used that adapter to create two 3 pins instead of just one 4 pin, and then used the remaining PSU cord to plug into the CHA_FAN1 which was a 4pin, and placed them in their slots, it would be fine? To be honest now that I think about it, the 4 pin from the fan-PSU-mobo didn't have the wires in the right order. The black wire couldn't match up on GND, and the yellow couldn't match up on 12v.
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July 9, 2011 2:04:32 AM

Also, the mobo could be fine even though there is basically a hole where it burnt, and smoke marks?
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a c 108 V Motherboard
July 11, 2011 7:17:46 PM

you previsously mentioned "groove", but now you're saying "hole". To clear things up, if you have a hole, then the circuits nearby the fan header may also be inoperative. Really, the only way you'll know for sure is if you try to power it up. I would do a breadboard (build outside the case) so that you only have to connect the bare necessities (RAM, CPU/HSF, GPU, & PSU); this would eliminate the need to connect any fans for the time being. If this works, then get yourself a fan splitter cable; they're inexpensive.
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