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Advice on an AMD 64-bit laptop with Nvidia graphics

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 11, 2004 7:36:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I am thinking of getting an AMD-64 bit laptop with Nvidia graphics and
was wondering if anyone has any words of advice before I do so. I found
a system at a reasonable price at the store linked. I am aware that
windows xp will be coming out with a 64 bit version soon, and that AMD
64 is backwards compatible with 32 bit software. I have read that AMD64
mobile processor runs very cool and quiet and better than Intel's
processors. Any helpful comments will be appreciated.


Link to the system:
http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?ref=fr...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 11, 2004 8:16:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

salwithed@yahoo.com writes:
> I am thinking of getting an AMD-64 bit laptop with Nvidia graphics and
> was wondering if anyone has any words of advice before I do so. I found
> a system at a reasonable price at the store linked. I am aware that
> windows xp will be coming out with a 64 bit version soon, and that AMD
> 64 is backwards compatible with 32 bit software. I have read that AMD64
> mobile processor runs very cool and quiet and better than Intel's
> processors. Any helpful comments will be appreciated.

I think those amd64 machines all will run much hotter than a Pentium-M.
The amd64 will be much faster too, of course.

Processors don't make noise, it's the cooling fans that make noise.
Some fans are quieter than others with the same airflow. Thinkpad
fans that I've had so far have all been pretty quiet. I almost bought
a Dell Inspiron 5000 a few years ago, but I tried one out and decided
that its noisy fan would drive me nuts. So I bought a Thinkpad A20p.

Anyway, if you're concerned about fan noise, you have to listen to the
actual fan. It's independent of the processor type.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 12, 2004 1:22:31 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

salwithed@yahoo.com wrote:

> I am thinking of getting an AMD-64 bit laptop with Nvidia graphics and
> was wondering if anyone has any words of advice before I do so. I found
> a system at a reasonable price at the store linked. I am aware that
> windows xp will be coming out with a 64 bit version soon, and that AMD
> 64 is backwards compatible with 32 bit software. I have read that AMD64
> mobile processor runs very cool and quiet and better than Intel's
> processors. Any helpful comments will be appreciated.
>
>
> Link to the system:
>
http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?ref=fr...

You can download 64-bit Windows from the Microsoft site now--it's a 1 year
time-bombed beta but it's free.

The AMD64 mobile is quite fast but is also more power hungry than a
Centrino. Whether the machine is quiet depends on how you have the power
set--running from battery the machine I have seldom throttles up high
enough to need to turn on the fans, but running on AC it does kick them in
periodically.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 12, 2004 8:11:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

<salwithed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1102811812.879763.146150@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>I am thinking of getting an AMD-64 bit laptop with Nvidia graphics and was
>wondering if anyone has any words of advice before I do so.

Hi,

Recently I compared HP Pavilion zd7000 and HP zv5255us. The first is with
P4M HT 3.2GHz, the second with AMD64. AMD is much more quiet and I'm sure
more powerful. But really silent laptop is in Centrino technology. If you
need a faster machine look for those with Dothan CPUs - 2.0 is a really good
choice although a little bit expensive these days. Thanks to Centrino it can
be very quiet and works for hours with battery.

Jacek
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 12, 2004 8:11:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

jh wrote:

> <salwithed@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1102811812.879763.146150@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>>I am thinking of getting an AMD-64 bit laptop with Nvidia graphics and
>>was wondering if anyone has any words of advice before I do so.
>
> Hi,
>
> Recently I compared HP Pavilion zd7000 and HP zv5255us. The first is with
> P4M HT 3.2GHz, the second with AMD64. AMD is much more quiet and I'm sure
> more powerful.

Certainly more powerful. But all laptops are silent unless there is a fan
turning or a DVD or CD spinning or the hard disk has something wrong with
it. My AMD64 makes no noise that I can hear unless it decides to turn on
the fans, at which point it makes about as much noise as an "average"
desktop machine.

> But really silent laptop is in Centrino technology.

The P4M _is_ "Centrino technology". The reason it's not sold as a
"Centrino", typically, is that the manufacturer of the machine has chosen
to use some other brand of wifi chip than Intel (Intel was late out the
door with support for the 54 Mb/sec technologies and backed the wrong horse
besides). To use the "Centrino" label a specific set of components in
addition to the processor have to be used.

> If you
> need a faster machine look for those with Dothan CPUs - 2.0 is a really
> good choice although a little bit expensive these days. Thanks to Centrino
> it can be very quiet and works for hours with battery.
>
> Jacek

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 14, 2004 3:29:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

One thing that you need to realize is the following...

The current Pentium 4 Chips using Hyperthreading (HT) are solely
creating a logical processor division, so that the operating system
thinks that it has 2 processors.

What this means is that for any one task, you can only devote 1/2 of
the processor's full potential, unless the application was written to
take into account Symmetric Multiprocessing (SMP) or other Thread based
process divisions.

The AMD Processors do not have logical processor division. This means
that they AMD Processors can perform tasks faster than the Pentium 4
Processors if the application was not written for SMP and utliizes the
full processor (Most games, CD to MP3 Converters, Video
Conversion/Transcoding Applicatiosn)

What this also means is that since the Pentium 4 chips do not utilize
their full potential in many cases, they run cooler.

This is ONLY because they are not utilizing full power.

If you were to disable Hyperthreading in the BIOS, you will see a
substantial performance when using many applications that were not
designed for Multiple Processors. This also means that the CPU will run
hotter on average as it has the full potential avaliable for any task.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 14, 2004 3:29:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

One thing that you need to realize is the following...

The current Pentium 4 Chips using Hyperthreading (HT) are solely
creating a logical processor division, so that the operating system
thinks that it has 2 processors.

What this means is that for any one task, you can only devote 1/2 of
the processor's full potential, unless the application was written to
take into account Symmetric Multiprocessing (SMP) or other Thread based
process divisions.

The AMD Processors do not have logical processor division. This means
that they AMD Processors can perform tasks faster than the Pentium 4
Processors if the application was not written for SMP and utliizes the
full processor (Most games, CD to MP3 Converters, Video
Conversion/Transcoding Applicatiosn)

What this also means is that since the Pentium 4 chips do not utilize
their full potential in many cases, they run cooler.

This is ONLY because they are not utilizing full power.

If you were to disable Hyperthreading in the BIOS, you will see a
substantial performance when using many applications that were not
designed for Multiple Processors. This also means that the CPU will run
hotter on average as it has the full potential avaliable for any task.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 14, 2004 1:55:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

projectle wrote:

> One thing that you need to realize is the following...
>
> The current Pentium 4 Chips using Hyperthreading (HT) are solely
> creating a logical processor division, so that the operating system
> thinks that it has 2 processors.
>
> What this means is that for any one task, you can only devote 1/2 of
> the processor's full potential, unless the application was written to
> take into account Symmetric Multiprocessing (SMP) or other Thread based
> process divisions.

What ever gave you that idea. Hyperthreading is a way to keep the
relatively long pipeline on the P4 full. The two logical processors
contend for resources--if only one is running a process it has access to
the full resources of the chip.

Do you have any test results to present which demonstrate that the
performance of a hyperthreaded P4 doubles when hyperthreading is turned
off? Or increases at all?

> The AMD Processors do not have logical processor division. This means
> that they AMD Processors can perform tasks faster than the Pentium 4
> Processors if the application was not written for SMP and utliizes the
> full processor (Most games, CD to MP3 Converters, Video
> Conversion/Transcoding Applicatiosn)

Do you have evidence to present that indicates that a P4 with hyperthreading
turned on performs better with tasks written to support SMP than does the
equivalent Athlon?

> What this also means is that since the Pentium 4 chips do not utilize
> their full potential in many cases, they run cooler.
>
> This is ONLY because they are not utilizing full power.

Pentium 4, yes, Pentium M use a somewhat different architecture in addition
to throttling. AMD chips use throttling too.

> If you were to disable Hyperthreading in the BIOS, you will see a
> substantial performance when using many applications that were not
> designed for Multiple Processors.

And your evidence for this is?

> This also means that the CPU will run
> hotter on average as it has the full potential avaliable for any task.

And your evidence for this is?

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
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