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20D and dust spots

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Anonymous
December 31, 2004 4:25:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dust seems to be a problem.

I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.

This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot the
sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I guess
changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the clone
stamp any time soon.

What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only have
one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and once
on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short stint
(mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).

If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things going
to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?

I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem with
the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any lenses?

I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
mountings....

Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of an
operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.

cheers

Lester

More about : 20d dust spots

Anonymous
December 31, 2004 4:25:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
news:41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
> Dust seems to be a problem.

Yes, it is. It is a problem common to all dSLRs. The spots mainly show up
against large expanses of sky or some light colored area. They get lost in
background clutter otherwise. It is the main reason I hesitated for so long
before getting a dSLR.

There is no way to keep dust out of the camera. The major source of dust
indoors is people -- everyone lives inside of a dust cloud, shedding an
aerosol of bits of skin and hair and particles of clothing and mites and
stuff out of every conceivable opening everywhere they go. Thankfully, we
don't think about it much, but it affects our photography. No matter what
you do, some of that is going to get into the camera. It is probably cleaner
to change your camera outdoors on a windy day.

Clean your sensor regularly, using a dry bulb to blow particles off the
chip. If something is really stubborn, a cotton swab and denatured alcohol
will work. If it does not come off with that, a trip to the repair shop is
in order.

Some manufacturers have a disclaimer saying that you should never try to
clean the chip. Nikon does this on cameras sold in the US, but then turns
around and sells a do it yourself cleaning kit in Japan. Maybe they think
American fingers are too big (thinking of the film "Crazy People") to do a
good job. Anyway, all the kit contains is a blower bulb, some swabs, and
some denatured alcohol. It tells you to run the very lightly moistened swabs
in swirls over the sensor. Be gentle; it should not take any pressure to
remove even stubborn dust. You are unlikely to scratch the sensor with a
swab, but I suspect you could knock it out of alignment. You don't want to
use enough fluid that it might leave a stain.

Canned air contains freezing cold fluids that can drip onto the sensor, so
most people avoid it. Even if it is certified as fluid free, it is under
enough pressure that when released it can cause moisture to condense out of
the air and form ice on the sensor. Whenever you run air through a narrow
passage to accelerate it the pressure is reduced, meaning it can hold less
water and the temperature is also reduced, which also lowers how much water
the air can contain and which means that any water that condenses out will
be cold. It is the reason that canned air and propane tanks and the like, if
run continuously, will sometimes clog up with ice at the valves.
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 4:25:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Short of removing dust from the face of the planet, dust is just something
we have to live with. As to the dust in your camera, it is likely there
from the factory... Yes, it's rather common.

I've been shooting digital for a few years, and I clean my sensor when
needed. Generally about once a month.

IMO don't bother with sensor swabs, they are just very expensive, and you
may go through an entire package of them in the first couple cleanings until
you get comfortable. I use a custom made thingy that I can not find the
website for right now, but it looks like a rubber maid spachula, which is
also an option. Then eclipse, and the lint free pads. I can get my sensor
clean in generally one pass.

Another product that has been given VERY good reviews, but I have not tried
is below.

http://www.visibledust.com/index.htm

As long as this planet has dust, it will find it's way onto sensors in
camera's with removable lenses. This is a fact, and I've not seen a perfect
solution other than to just not worry about it, and clean the sensor.

If the thought of cleaning a sensor makes you physically ill, you can take
the camera into service, and many do this now while you wait.

Personally, I am more comfortable do it myself as I take very good care of
my equipment, and I'm not so sure the guys they have doing sensor cleaning
are any more trained than myself.

Ron

"Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
news:41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
> Dust seems to be a problem.
>
> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>
> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot
> the sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I
> guess changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using
> the clone stamp any time soon.
>
> What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only have
> one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and
> once on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a
> short stint (mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
>
> If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things
> going to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
>
> I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
> dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem
> with the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any
> lenses?
>
> I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
> wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
> mountings....
>
> Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of an
> operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
>
> cheers
>
> Lester
>
>
>
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Anonymous
December 31, 2004 4:33:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
news:41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
> Dust seems to be a problem.
>
> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>
> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot
the
> sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I
guess
> changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the
clone
> stamp any time soon.

I've had a 10D for nearly 2 years, and it's been in amateur use and has
taken >5000 images. I also mainly use prime lenses. If I stop down to f22,
I too can see dust spots. BUT, why do I mainly use prime lenses ? So that
I can use f2.8, f4 and f5.6 and still get sharp images; and at f1.4 as well.
Stop worrying, and get out taking some photos!
--
M Stewart
Milton Keynes, UK
http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 5:43:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>
> I've had a 10D for nearly 2 years, and it's been in amateur use and has
> taken >5000 images. I also mainly use prime lenses. If I stop down to
> f22,
> I too can see dust spots. BUT, why do I mainly use prime lenses ? So
> that
> I can use f2.8, f4 and f5.6 and still get sharp images; and at f1.4 as
> well.
> Stop worrying, and get out taking some photos!
> --
> M Stewart
> Milton Keynes, UK
> http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
>
>
>

Thanks for the confidence boost, but is the 10D better sealed or are you
lucky?

I guess there is an issue of finding a problem if one looks for it on my
part, the dust motes are barely detectable at f8 and then probably not at
all except on an even tone.

The other reason for avoiding zooms are the weight and size, particularly
for the Canon f2.8L flavours. On my old FD system I did have a 70-210/f4,
but it was so cumbersome I almost never used it.

thanks


Lester
December 31, 2004 6:00:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

C J Campbell wrote:

>
> "Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
>> Dust seems to be a problem.
>
> Yes, it is. It is a problem common to all dSLRs.

This is why the olympus Dslr's have the untrasonic sensor cleaning cycle at
every start up. They are the only people doing this, can't see why others
don't so something like this to avoid this obvious problem?
--

Stacey
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 6:38:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Lester Wareham wrote:
>> I've had a 10D for nearly 2 years, and it's been in amateur use and
>> has taken >5000 images. I also mainly use prime lenses. If I stop
>> down to f22,
>> I too can see dust spots. BUT, why do I mainly use prime lenses ? So
>> that
>> I can use f2.8, f4 and f5.6 and still get sharp images; and at f1.4
>> as well.
>> Stop worrying, and get out taking some photos!
>> --
>> M Stewart
>> Milton Keynes, UK
>> http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
>>
>>
>>
>
> Thanks for the confidence boost, but is the 10D better sealed or are
> you lucky?

I don't think you are getting much dust in with the lens on, although
zoom lenses may have a chance of creating a problem, I have not seen in in
my 20D, as of yet. I admit I am more careful changing lenses than I was
with my non-digital SLRs. Still I have changed lenses in the rain and not
had a problem.

>
> I guess there is an issue of finding a problem if one looks for it
> on my part, the dust motes are barely detectable at f8 and then
> probably not at all except on an even tone.
>
> The other reason for avoiding zooms are the weight and size,
> particularly for the Canon f2.8L flavours. On my old FD system I did
> have a 70-210/f4, but it was so cumbersome I almost never used it.
>
> thanks
>
>
> Lester

--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
December 31, 2004 6:44:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
news:41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
> Dust seems to be a problem.
>
> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>
> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot
the
> sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I
guess
> changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the
clone
> stamp any time soon.
>
> What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only have
> one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and
once
> on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short
stint
> (mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
>
> If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things
going
> to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
>
> I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
> dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem
with
> the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any
lenses?
>
> I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
> wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
> mountings....
>
> Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of an
> operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
>
> cheers
>
> Lester
>

Lester, please see my posts in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems. The thread is
titled "sensor cleaning".

I am also fairly new to the 20D and saw about 10-15 dust spots @ f/22
straight out of the box essentially. Initially I was very upset about this
(being new to DSLR also) and it made me very uncomfortable. I did quite a
bit of research and this is totally not uncommon. I tried the rocket air
bulb blower yesterday and it removed all my dust-spots. I did not resort to
physically touching the sensor. Note that I had my significant other hold a
vacuum in the proximity of the camera while I used the blower (but I am not
sure if this is really necessary).

Here is a link to the rocket blower:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=produ...

Here are some other cleaning methods/links **try at own risk!!**:
http://www.photo.net/equipment/digital/sensorcleaning/
http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/sensor-cleanin...

After reading all the physical cleaning methods, I was very happy that the
blower worked for me. Those C02 blowers look very good too.

Hope this helps
Musty.
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 6:44:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Note that I had my significant other hold a
> vacuum in the proximity of the camera while I used the blower (but I am
> not
> sure if this is really necessary).
>

Using a vacuum near the camera is likley going to stir up more dust than
not. Vacuums in general are NOT recommended for sensor cleaning because
they expell air, and that results in stirring up dust.

The sensor is not some fragile chunk of frozen glass that will shatter with
a touch. Rather what you are cleaning is NOT the sensor at all, but the AA
filter. These are made of a farily hard plastic, and do not scratch that
easily.

There has been a truckload of study, research, and web discussion on sensor
cleaning..... Just do a bit of research, and pick the method you are most
comfortable with. I can tell you from first hand experience over the past
several years, that you WILL need to clean the sensor with more than a
blower at some point UNLESS you just never remove the lens.

Ron
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 7:06:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 13:25:18 -0000, "Lester Wareham"
<nospam@please.co.uk> wrote:

>Dust seems to be a problem.
>
>I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
>migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>
>This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot the
>sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I guess
>changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the clone
>stamp any time soon.
>
>What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only have
>one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and once
>on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short stint
>(mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
>
>If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things going
>to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
>
>I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
>dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem with
>the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any lenses?
>
>I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
>wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
>mountings....
>
>Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of an
>operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
>
>cheers
>
>Lester
>
You think you've got problems :-))
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeb1/
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 8:51:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Anyone know of a UK supplier for "Sensor Swabs" and "Eclipse Optic Cleaner"
for sensor cleaning?

"Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:VteBd.34850$wD4.21528@fe1.texas.rr.com...
>
> "Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
>> Dust seems to be a problem.
>>
>> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
>> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>>
>> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot
> the
>> sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I
> guess
>> changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the
> clone
>> stamp any time soon.
>>
>> What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only
>> have
>> one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and
> once
>> on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short
> stint
>> (mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
>>
>> If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things
> going
>> to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
>>
>> I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
>> dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem
> with
>> the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any
> lenses?
>>
>> I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
>> wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
>> mountings....
>>
>> Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of
>> an
>> operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
>>
>> cheers
>>
>> Lester
>>
>
> Lester, please see my posts in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems. The thread
> is
> titled "sensor cleaning".
>
> I am also fairly new to the 20D and saw about 10-15 dust spots @ f/22
> straight out of the box essentially. Initially I was very upset about this
> (being new to DSLR also) and it made me very uncomfortable. I did quite a
> bit of research and this is totally not uncommon. I tried the rocket air
> bulb blower yesterday and it removed all my dust-spots. I did not resort
> to
> physically touching the sensor. Note that I had my significant other hold
> a
> vacuum in the proximity of the camera while I used the blower (but I am
> not
> sure if this is really necessary).
>
> Here is a link to the rocket blower:
> http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=produ...
>
> Here are some other cleaning methods/links **try at own risk!!**:
> http://www.photo.net/equipment/digital/sensorcleaning/
> http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning
> http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/sensor-cleanin...
>
> After reading all the physical cleaning methods, I was very happy that the
> blower worked for me. Those C02 blowers look very good too.
>
> Hope this helps
> Musty.
>
>
December 31, 2004 9:15:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
news:41d5918e$0$21317$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
> Anyone know of a UK supplier for "Sensor Swabs" and "Eclipse Optic
Cleaner"
> for sensor cleaning?
>

I would really try a bulb blower first. I think a lot of the sites which
strongly advocate using direct contact cleaning methods are trying to sell
it to you. There was a poster in the thread which I mentioned that said he
had been using a bulb blower on DSLR for 3 years with success. It worked for
me on a 20D. Direct cleaning should be a last resort only.

> "Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote in message
> news:VteBd.34850$wD4.21528@fe1.texas.rr.com...
> >
> > "Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
> > news:41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
> >> Dust seems to be a problem.
> >>
> >> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
> >> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
> >>
> >> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and
shoot
> > the
> >> sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I
> > guess
> >> changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the
> > clone
> >> stamp any time soon.
> >>
> >> What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only
> >> have
> >> one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and
> > once
> >> on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short
> > stint
> >> (mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
> >>
> >> If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things
> > going
> >> to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
> >>
> >> I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to
be
> >> dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem
> > with
> >> the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any
> > lenses?
> >>
> >> I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
> >> wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
> >> mountings....
> >>
> >> Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of
> >> an
> >> operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
> >>
> >> cheers
> >>
> >> Lester
> >>
> >
> > Lester, please see my posts in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems. The thread
> > is
> > titled "sensor cleaning".
> >
> > I am also fairly new to the 20D and saw about 10-15 dust spots @ f/22
> > straight out of the box essentially. Initially I was very upset about
this
> > (being new to DSLR also) and it made me very uncomfortable. I did quite
a
> > bit of research and this is totally not uncommon. I tried the rocket air
> > bulb blower yesterday and it removed all my dust-spots. I did not resort
> > to
> > physically touching the sensor. Note that I had my significant other
hold
> > a
> > vacuum in the proximity of the camera while I used the blower (but I am
> > not
> > sure if this is really necessary).
> >
> > Here is a link to the rocket blower:
> >
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=produ...
> >
> > Here are some other cleaning methods/links **try at own risk!!**:
> > http://www.photo.net/equipment/digital/sensorcleaning/
> > http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning
> > http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/sensor-cleanin...
> >
> > After reading all the physical cleaning methods, I was very happy that
the
> > blower worked for me. Those C02 blowers look very good too.
> >
> > Hope this helps
> > Musty.
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 9:43:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:%GgBd.37562$yv2.16322@fe2.texas.rr.com...
>
> "Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:41d5918e$0$21317$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
>> Anyone know of a UK supplier for "Sensor Swabs" and "Eclipse Optic
> Cleaner"
>> for sensor cleaning?
>>
>
> I would really try a bulb blower first. I think a lot of the sites which
> strongly advocate using direct contact cleaning methods are trying to sell
> it to you. There was a poster in the thread which I mentioned that said he
> had been using a bulb blower on DSLR for 3 years with success. It worked
> for
> me on a 20D. Direct cleaning should be a last resort only.
>
>

No I agree, I just want to find sutable materials if it comes to that. It
would have to be very bad though.
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 9:58:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <41d5918e$0$21317$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk>, Lester Wareham
<nospam@please.co.uk> wrote:

> Anyone know of a UK supplier for "Sensor Swabs" and "Eclipse Optic Cleaner"
> for sensor cleaning?
>
Try Crown Digital http://www.crown-digital.co.uk/ishop/883/.

I've just this afternoon done my first sensor clean on my D70 using
Eclipe and Pec-pads bought from them and the SensorSwipe from
Copperhill Images http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning. This
appears to have been completely successful. Pec-pads and the
SensorSwipe are considerably cheaper than the Sensor Swabs (which Crown
also sell); I found I nneded more than one 'go' to get all the dust
off, though this might just be donw to my nervousness. If you do need
more than one then the 12 GBP each cost of Sensor Swabs could get
annoying!

John
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 10:36:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 13:25:18 -0000, "Lester Wareham"
<nospam@please.co.uk> wrote:

>Dust seems to be a problem.
>
>I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
>migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>
>This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot the
>sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I guess
>changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using the clone
>stamp any time soon.

I would try to treat the cause rather than the symptoms, or you may
find "treatments" getting way out of hand.

>What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only have
>one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery and once
>on xmas day.

The speed of the change and the cleanliness of the environment (among
other factors) have a lot do with keeping a camera clean. I have one
lens sitting mount down next to my camera on a clean steady surface. I
then loosen both the lens on the camera and the protective cap on the
other lens. Taking one in each hand I swap as quickly as possible
raising them no higher than absolutely necessary immediately twisting
both "home". It helps to note the little red connection indicators to
prevent unnecessary fumbling. I have changed lenses this way for over
20 years and it keep dirt and dust to a minimum.

> The camera has only been used in doors apart from a short stint
>(mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
>
>If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things going
>to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
>
>I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
>dust proof, but this seems to be an issue.

It is not an issue with my 20D, perhaps the dust gets in between
changes. I would think that any static charge built up on the back of
a lens or image sensor would attract dust like a magnet.

> Is this a particular problem with
>the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any lenses?
>
>I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
>wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
>mountings....
>
>Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of an
>operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
>
>cheers
>
>Lester
>
>
>
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 11:21:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 15:00:33 -0500, Stacey <fotocord@yahoo.com> wrote:

>C J Campbell wrote:
>
>>
>> "Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
>> news:41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
>>> Dust seems to be a problem.
>>
>> Yes, it is. It is a problem common to all dSLRs.
>
>This is why the olympus Dslr's have the untrasonic sensor cleaning cycle at
>every start up. They are the only people doing this, can't see why others
>don't so something like this to avoid this obvious problem?
>--
>
> Stacey
Do you use a camera with that feature? I just read up on it and it
kind of reminds me of using a dustmop in a closed room and then
shaking it out to clean the mop ;o)
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 2:11:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <311220041858476217%jargyle@nospam.invalid>, John Argyle
<jargyle@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <41d5918e$0$21317$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk>, Lester Wareham
> <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote:
>
> > Anyone know of a UK supplier for "Sensor Swabs" and "Eclipse Optic Cleaner"
> > for sensor cleaning?
> >
> Try Crown Digital http://www.crown-digital.co.uk/ishop/883/.
>
> I've just this afternoon done my first sensor clean on my D70 using
> Eclipe and Pec-pads bought from them and the SensorSwipe from
> Copperhill Images http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning. This
> appears to have been completely successful. Pec-pads and the
> SensorSwipe are considerably cheaper than the Sensor Swabs (which Crown
> also sell); I found I nneded more than one 'go' to get all the dust
> off, though this might just be donw to my nervousness. If you do need
> more than one then the 12 GBP each cost of Sensor Swabs could get
> annoying!
>
> John
Sorry, brain not in gear. Should have read 3 GBP each for SensorSwipes.
(36 GBP for a box of 12). Still a bit expensive though if you use
several.
John
January 1, 2005 2:30:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

C J Campbell <christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Yes, it is. It is a problem common to all dSLRs.

My E-1 has a gadget to clean the sensor automatically everytime I switch
the thing on - seems to keep it clean quite nicely. Happy shooting ;-)
January 1, 2005 2:36:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Lester, if you can afford it get the Canon EF 70 to 200 L series F4. Quite
light, beautifully built (never cumbersome) and balances the 20D perfectly.
It is SHARP and very very useful for a wide range of photo situations. One
that surprised me is as a portrait lens at the 70mm end.

regards

Don from Down Under
"Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
news:41d56590$0$21324$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
>
>>
>> I've had a 10D for nearly 2 years, and it's been in amateur use and has
>> taken >5000 images. I also mainly use prime lenses. If I stop down to
>> f22,
>> I too can see dust spots. BUT, why do I mainly use prime lenses ? So
>> that
>> I can use f2.8, f4 and f5.6 and still get sharp images; and at f1.4 as
>> well.
>> Stop worrying, and get out taking some photos!
>> --
>> M Stewart
>> Milton Keynes, UK
>> http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
>>
>>
>>
>
> Thanks for the confidence boost, but is the 10D better sealed or are you
> lucky?
>
> I guess there is an issue of finding a problem if one looks for it on my
> part, the dust motes are barely detectable at f8 and then probably not at
> all except on an even tone.
>
> The other reason for avoiding zooms are the weight and size, particularly
> for the Canon f2.8L flavours. On my old FD system I did have a 70-210/f4,
> but it was so cumbersome I almost never used it.
>
> thanks
>
>
> Lester
>
>
>
January 1, 2005 2:45:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

A review on the product visible dust can be found at Luminous Landscape as
follows:

http://luminous-landscape.com/reviews/visible-dust.shtm...

Have a read and let us know if you go down this track.

regards

Don from Down Under


"RonFrank" <ronfrank@wisperXtelx.net> wrote in message
news:gtGdnUE4fYApA0jcRVn-jA@wispertel.com...
> Short of removing dust from the face of the planet, dust is just something
> we have to live with. As to the dust in your camera, it is likely there
> from the factory... Yes, it's rather common.
>
> I've been shooting digital for a few years, and I clean my sensor when
> needed. Generally about once a month.
>
> IMO don't bother with sensor swabs, they are just very expensive, and you
> may go through an entire package of them in the first couple cleanings
> until you get comfortable. I use a custom made thingy that I can not find
> the website for right now, but it looks like a rubber maid spachula, which
> is also an option. Then eclipse, and the lint free pads. I can get my
> sensor clean in generally one pass.
>
> Another product that has been given VERY good reviews, but I have not
> tried is below.
>
> http://www.visibledust.com/index.htm
>
> As long as this planet has dust, it will find it's way onto sensors in
> camera's with removable lenses. This is a fact, and I've not seen a
> perfect solution other than to just not worry about it, and clean the
> sensor.
>
> If the thought of cleaning a sensor makes you physically ill, you can take
> the camera into service, and many do this now while you wait.
>
> Personally, I am more comfortable do it myself as I take very good care of
> my equipment, and I'm not so sure the guys they have doing sensor cleaning
> are any more trained than myself.
>
> Ron
>
> "Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
>> Dust seems to be a problem.
>>
>> I noticed a piece of fluff on the viewfinder today. Rather than let it
>> migrate to the sensor I *think* I managed to remove it.
>>
>> This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot
>> the sky out of focus. Sure enough there are a couple of faint spots, so I
>> guess changing from film to digital won't mean I will be giving up using
>> the clone stamp any time soon.
>>
>> What I find disturbing is this is a brand new camera for xmas, I only
>> have one EF lens which has been mounted exactly twice, once on delivery
>> and once on xmas day. The camera has only been used in doors apart from a
>> short stint (mostly because I have been fixing my central heating).
>>
>> If this is the amount of dust intrusion at this point what are things
>> going to be like after changing lenses in windy conditions a few times?
>>
>> I know the 20D is not a pro camera so I was not expecting the mount to be
>> dust proof, but this seems to be an issue. Is this a particular problem
>> with the cheap 18-55mm kit lens or can I expect the same problem with any
>> lenses?
>>
>> I was planning to get mostly prime lenses like my old system but now I
>> wonder if I should consider zooms just to reduce the number of lens
>> mountings....
>>
>> Can some of the more experienced DSLR users please indicate how much of
>> an operational issue sensor dust is and what precautions they take.
>>
>> cheers
>>
>> Lester
>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 5:34:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk>,
"Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote:

>This prompted me to try the sensor dust test (stop down to f22 and shoot the
>sky out of focus.

You can shoot any white wall out of focus, too. No need for a sky.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 10:00:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

What a weird suggestion. Are there many places in the world where the sky is
inaccessible, other than, perhaps, the bottom of a mine shaft? <BG>

Rob

---------------------------------

<JPS@no.komm> wrote ...
>
> You can shoot any white wall out of focus, too. No need for a sky.
January 1, 2005 10:26:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ZONED! wrote:


> Do you use a camera with that feature? I just read up on it and it
> kind of reminds me of using a dustmop in a closed room and then
> shaking it out to clean the mop ;o)

Actually it has a piece of something similar to fly paper below the sensor
to trap the dust. I suppose at some point that would become saturated and
need to be replaced but it still seems like someone who is at least trying
to work out a solution rather than pretend it doesn't exist.

--

Stacey
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 5:53:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

With the solutions presented in this thread, it would seem the more
things change, the more they remain the same. I'm thinking it's just
an old problem that won't go away as you'll see in this link:

http://www.popphoto.com/article.asp?print_page=y&sectio...

Same stuff, different day? My point is that one of the guys here said
he didn't buy a DSLR because of this problem. Why, if he already had
an SLR? Now you don't have to worry about fogged or scratched film..
or my favorite, shooting with no film. I remember risking my life for
some shots of bear cubs and momma bear, only to find out later that the
sprockets hadn't quite caught the film in my haste to change film just
as I spotted them. I got suspicious when the counter got to 45 on a 36
exposure roll. Course, I guess a defective CF card could cause the
same problems... Oh God, something else to worry about!
January 2, 2005 9:37:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 13:25:18 -0000
In message <41d55339$0$21322$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk>
Posted from Zen Internet
"Lester Wareham" <nospam@please.co.uk> wrote:

> Dust seems to be a problem.
> <snip>

The emery-board plastic around the lens mount is one
of several "little" things that make me want to throw
the 20D off a cliff. (Other things at the top of the
list are the horrid viewfinder and the fixed-fast frame
rate and the fixed self timer... then there are the
<SNIP> ;-)

As someone else suggested use a bulb blower. But before
you change lenses wipe the buildup of finger and other
dusty dirt-like stuff around the mount, and blow the
mount area clean before changing lenses. Whenever I'm
in a dust free environment (hard to find) I turn the
camera face down and blow out the dust from the mirror
and sensor area.

NEVER use canned air... you may not always remember to
hold the can perfectly vertical. :-()

Jeff
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 11:14:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 19:26:02 -0500, Stacey <fotocord@yahoo.com> wrote:

>ZONED! wrote:
>
>
>> Do you use a camera with that feature? I just read up on it and it
>> kind of reminds me of using a dustmop in a closed room and then
>> shaking it out to clean the mop ;o)
>
>Actually it has a piece of something similar to fly paper below the sensor
>to trap the dust. I suppose at some point that would become saturated and
>need to be replaced but it still seems like someone who is at least trying
>to work out a solution rather than pretend it doesn't exist.
>
>--
>
> Stacey


Oh, that clears up what it does. I did not know of any kind of trap.
Thanks
!