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Dumb Problem

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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July 11, 2010 6:03:07 PM

My trade is automechanics however since starting at my most recent dealership, I've become the alpha geek since I have a vague idea about computers and the designated server admin is an accountant. Sob story over.

Problem is, in the shop, we have a toughbook with a linksys wired router so we can have access to all the information we need when we're at the cars. We just added another laptop to the shop and they asked me to set it up. sure, what's the wep? no one wrote it down. Oh, okay, well, we'll just reset the wireless point and start over. No one wrote down the ips etc used to set up the router. So I can't even really start over without tearing into the whole network which would be .... dumb.

So i went to the existing laptop, I used NIRsoft's retrieval tool and got a hex key and a garbled ascii code. Question is, how do I input the hex key instead of the garbled ascii (s ™Ç) without resetting the router and causing myself a whole bunch of headaches? Do I need to climb a ladder to the access point with a laptop and a cable?

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Anonymous
July 11, 2010 6:18:02 PM

Yes, get climbing or whatever to the router user setup screens. Download the manual from Linksys and get into the wireless security section. Personally, I would stop using WEP and switch to WPA PSK TKIP as it is safer and easier to use.

If the IP address or default password for accessing the router setup has been changed, use the reset button to restore defaults.
July 11, 2010 6:22:48 PM

cheers, I thought I would need to. Hopefully the lazy people who set this up for us didn't change the password or it's game over. no one wrote a single thing down and now I get to deal with it. Actually, i get to wash my hands of it and tell the dealership to spend money.
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Anonymous
July 11, 2010 6:23:55 PM

If the IP address or default password for accessing the router setup has been changed, use the reset button to restore defaults.

Sorry, game not over yet.
July 11, 2010 6:39:02 PM

wouldn't all the access point information in the wireless be lost as well? they're trying to have me go in a back door so we can put this other laptop online without losing anything or having to bring down the network admins again who've already told us that everything'll need to be reset and btw what's all your information? thanks to incompetance, there's a big price tag.

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Anonymous
July 11, 2010 6:45:49 PM
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It's true you might have to grit your teeth to reset the WAN pages -- these are more of a concern if it's an ADSL internet connection rather than cable -- either way the internet provider helpline or website should be able to talk you through matching the router WAN settings to the provider's preferred settings.

The LAN pages are pretty simple.

Of course this is not all that different from setting up a new router.
July 11, 2010 6:55:52 PM

they're talking about that and a new server, however getting the access points from the ISP seems to have stymied our "admin/accountant" which is why the work has stalled. I used to setup internet connections in the dial up days for an isp and have been playing with my own routers now that wireless has taken over. this is why they're asking me because I seem to be able to udnerstand what they're trying to do. my concern is by taking an essential tool offline which is why I don't believe it would be good to reset, if it can be avoided. especially since I need to have this tool online to be able to do my job which I actually get paid to do.
July 11, 2010 7:52:19 PM

Best answer selected by spurious.
Anonymous
July 11, 2010 8:51:31 PM

You're referring to access points and then routers -- to keep this simple I'd just stick with the router for the moment. It may be good policy to buy the router from the ISP as the WAN settings will be set up to work already. I guess a second choice would be to buy the same unit retail and get advice from the ISP on settings.

I suspect that the issue of it being the workplace setup is intimidating but, aside from the access points issue (on which I'm not clear at this point) this project should be no more difficult than setting up your home network.
July 12, 2010 1:03:35 AM

yeah, basically it is just like adding a second computer to a home network. Problem is, I can't just reset the wireless without knowing the WAN pages inside if they're keyed certain IPs on the overall system. we don't have any info on the overall system because it was never recorded and/or kept. They're looking at upgrading but meanwhile, we have techs who're standing around waiting for the laptop and only one will go online which has us sitting on about a 9k laptop (OBDII interface, snap-on tools stamped on the side. those make it pricey) that can't live up to its potential. trying to fix it, but it may be a no-win situation until they open up the finances.
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