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Dual OS on SSD and HDD

Last response: in Storage
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December 2, 2012 12:32:25 PM

I have two questions, one of them seems possible but the other not so much. This may not be the best section for these, but I wasn't sure honestly because it deals with three things. I figured I'd start here, if it isn't appropriate, I apologize. If anyone knows any other sections in could go to or any other places I could research, please tell me.

The first is: I want to get two SSDs and use each on as a boot drive, one for Linux and one for Windows, while only having one HDD. It's a 2TB HDD so I have the room, but is it possible to split it up somehow? I know if you have two OS on one HDD that you can, I've done that . But is this possible and how would I do it?

The second is: I already have one SSD and I was wondering if, until I can get the second one, I could put one on the HDD and one on the SSD and have the HDD split. One half being for the OS and its files, while the other is the storage for the OS on the SSD. Same question as before, is it possible and how?

Thanks in advance. =)

More about : dual ssd hdd

a b G Storage
December 2, 2012 2:01:44 PM

Sure, it's possible. I recommend you load your Windows on the SSD you have now without the hard drive connected. Make sure it is fully updated and then re-attach the hard drive. Then load Linux on the hard drive. It will give you options on how to partition the hard drive for your purpose, use the recommended partition types for Linux and leave enough room for the Windows (NTFS) partition you can set up later. It will set up grub so you can determine which OS to load on boot.
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December 2, 2012 2:30:49 PM

What if I want to put Linux on the SSD. I bought the SSD thinking I would only use Linux, so it's kind of small. I should have said that originally. But then I realized that I would need Windows for games and also the drivers may not be compatible with Linux. If I Install Windows first and then the drivers, everything should run well and I won't have to go through the trouble of finding drivers or changing file types. If that isn't the case, then I'd just wipe out and clear it and use the SSD for Windows. It will be time consuming but I was thinking I could install Windows on the HDD, then take the HDD out, put the SSD in, install Windows on the SSD, then install Linux from a Live CD, and during the installation replace Windows with Linux so that it clears Windows. That is time consuming but that seems like the easiest way to me. What I don't know how to do is partition the HDD after that. Is there a way to do that? I was just thinking about this, or I would have put it in the original post.
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a b G Storage
December 2, 2012 2:40:41 PM

When installing OS's only have 1 drive connected to the computer. I dont care if it Linux, Windows or anything else just 1 drive connected when you are done just reconnect the other drive/s. When installing any OS you will be prompted as to where to install at that point you can partition the drive the way you like.
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December 2, 2012 4:17:30 PM

Well that's what I was going to do.
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a b G Storage
December 3, 2012 4:31:19 PM

If you want the grub menu for dual boot you'll have to load Windows on the hard drive (without the SSD attached) and then, connect the ssd and with the hard drive still attached, load Linux there. It will do everything needed to give you dual boot. Or, you could do as anonymous1 says install both of them separately and use bios for choosing one to boot.
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December 3, 2012 5:19:54 PM

I was going to choose which one from the BIOS each time, but how do I get Linux which will be saved to the SSD to save files like documents and pictures to the HDD? How do I partition it like that?
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a b G Storage
December 4, 2012 3:26:32 PM

If you want to use BIOS to choose make sure you install each system on a drive with the other drive disconnected.

Linux will recognize NTFS partitions just fine and mount them in the file system. Just use regular copy/cut/paste or options in your programs to put the files on the NTFS partition. If you save audio or video files most likely both systems will be able to use them. You could partition the windows drive into two or more partitions and format to Linux standards but it's not really necessary.
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