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Mixing two different g.skill ram sticks - same specs

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  • Memory
  • G.SKILL
  • RAM
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July 14, 2011 11:34:48 PM

Hello All,

I currently have 4GB (2x2GB) of g.skill RAM in my system, model F2-6400CL5D-4GBNT. I was about to buy another set, but Newegg (actually everyone) has stopped carrying them.

My question is, would it be ok to purchase and install the newer (and I think nicer) g.skill model F2-6400CL5D-4GBPQ set instead? It is also a 2x2GB set, and the voltage, timings, speed, latency, (and brand obviously) are all identical. The only visible difference is the built in heatsink, and the new set voltage is 1.8-1.9v, whereas my current set is 1.8v.

Here's the links to the newegg pages for both sets:

My current ram:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The new set I'm looking at:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


What do you think? Am I good to go ahead with this set? Thanks!

More about : mixing skill ram sticks specs

July 14, 2011 11:39:59 PM

Sorry, forgot to include my specs:

Asus M4a785 Mobo
Phenom II 955 black 3.2
4GB G.Skill NT series DDR2 pc2-6400
Apevia 700W PSU
XFX Radeon HD 6790 GPU
WD Caviar Black 500 GB
WD Caviar Blue 320GB
Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
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a b } Memory
July 15, 2011 1:20:49 AM

your RAM same spec , no problem ! but don't overclock it you MIX RAM, remember you had Ram value and New RAM is Ocable.
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July 15, 2011 4:35:10 AM

henydiah said:
your RAM same spec , no problem ! but don't overclock it you MIX RAM, remember you had Ram value and New RAM is Ocable.



Cool thanks. I think I'll go with that set of RAM since I'm not planning on overclocking it.

I did however want to do a mild overclock on my CPU, just to 3.4-3.6ghz, I wouldn't have to mess with OC'ing my RAM right?
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a b } Memory
July 15, 2011 4:38:18 AM

yes right ... you have 955Be , OC use multiplier , always keep temperature !
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a c 114 } Memory
July 15, 2011 4:50:36 AM

Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards can be very sensitive to this.
It is better to get what you need in one kit.

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July 15, 2011 7:00:12 AM

geofelt said:
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards can be very sensitive to this.
It is better to get what you need in one kit.



Ok, so that leads me to another question: I can still buy a set of 2x1GB sticks of the NT series RAM from Amazon or Newegg. Since that is the exact same type of RAM thats in my computer now, would that be a better way to go? Then my total RAM would be 6GB: 2x2GB and 2X1GB, all NT series.

I was worried about doing that though because I wasn't sure if having a pair of 2GB sticks and a pair of 1GB sticks would disable dual channel mode and actually hurt my performance

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a c 114 } Memory
July 15, 2011 3:45:47 PM

jaykoit said:
Ok, so that leads me to another question: I can still buy a set of 2x1GB sticks of the NT series RAM from Amazon or Newegg. Since that is the exact same type of RAM thats in my computer now, would that be a better way to go? Then my total RAM would be 6GB: 2x2GB and 2X1GB, all NT series.

I was worried about doing that though because I wasn't sure if having a pair of 2GB sticks and a pair of 1GB sticks would disable dual channel mode and actually hurt my performance

1) The exact same ram may not be exactly the same. Raam manufacturere can and do regularly change the make up of components to get the same specs.

2) That said, more modern intel motherboards seem to be a bit more tolerant of different ram. You are likely to be ok, but that is no guarantee.

3) To get dual channel mode, you only need to have equal amounts of ram across the channels. In this case 3gb on each channel is ok.

4) You want documented ram compatibility. If you should ever have a problem, you want supported ram.
Otherwise, you risk a finger pointing battle between the ram and motherboard support sites, claiming "not my problem".
One place to check is your motherboards web site.
Look for the ram QVL list. It lists all of the ram kits that have been tested with that particular motherboard.
Sometimes the QVL list is not updates after the motherboard is released.
For more current info, go to a ram vendor's web site and access their ram selection configurator.
Enter your motherboard, and you will get a list of compatible ram kits.
While today's motherboards are more tolerant of different ram, it makes sense to buy ram that is known to work and is supported.

5) The odds are good, that any added ram that you add will work OK so long as the voltage, type, and speeds match.
But if you want a guarantee, get a supported 2 x 4gb 8gb kit. Then either add your 2 x 2gb kit and cee if it works, giving you 12gb. If it does not, then sell it.
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July 15, 2011 8:33:01 PM

geofelt said:
1) The exact same ram may not be exactly the same. Raam manufacturere can and do regularly change the make up of components to get the same specs.

2) That said, more modern intel motherboards seem to be a bit more tolerant of different ram. You are likely to be ok, but that is no guarantee.

3) To get dual channel mode, you only need to have equal amounts of ram across the channels. In this case 3gb on each channel is ok.

4) You want documented ram compatibility. If you should ever have a problem, you want supported ram.
Otherwise, you risk a finger pointing battle between the ram and motherboard support sites, claiming "not my problem".
One place to check is your motherboards web site.
Look for the ram QVL list. It lists all of the ram kits that have been tested with that particular motherboard.
Sometimes the QVL list is not updates after the motherboard is released.
For more current info, go to a ram vendor's web site and access their ram selection configurator.
Enter your motherboard, and you will get a list of compatible ram kits.
While today's motherboards are more tolerant of different ram, it makes sense to buy ram that is known to work and is supported.

5) The odds are good, that any added ram that you add will work OK so long as the voltage, type, and speeds match.
But if you want a guarantee, get a supported 2 x 4gb 8gb kit. Then either add your 2 x 2gb kit and cee if it works, giving you 12gb. If it does not, then sell it.



Cool, thanks for all the info. I think that answers all my questions, but just to clarify: so you're saying if I get another pair of the 2X1GB sticks, I'd want to pair a 2GB stick with a 1GB stick for each channel? Just making sure that's how they should be installed to correctly run dual channel mode. Thanks!
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a c 114 } Memory
July 15, 2011 8:43:51 PM

jaykoit said:
Cool, thanks for all the info. I think that answers all my questions, but just to clarify: so you're saying if I get another pair of the 2X1GB sticks, I'd want to pair a 2GB stick with a 1GB stick for each channel? Just making sure that's how they should be installed to correctly run dual channel mode. Thanks!


Exactly.
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July 15, 2011 9:01:14 PM

Best answer selected by jaykoit.
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July 15, 2011 9:02:38 PM

geofelt said:
Exactly.



Thanks geofelt, that officially answers all my questions
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