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Updating Firmware on Secondary Seagate Barracuda 1tb 7200.12 HDD (Primary and bo

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December 5, 2012 11:53:49 AM

Hello,

I tried using seagate's firmware update utility but it always results in a "FAIL" at the startup and brings me back to where I started. I suspected this was because I had both and SSD and an HDD connected.

Am I correct in that I should just burn the firmware iso onto a bootable usb drive, disconnect and unpower the ssd, and take it from there?
December 5, 2012 11:56:54 AM

The title got cut. It's supposed to read:
"Updating Firmware on secondary Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 1TB HDD (Primary and bootable is Intel 330 Series 240gb SSD) - Windows 7 Ultimate"
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December 5, 2012 4:50:35 PM

The CD ISO would be the preferable update method. Seagate's Windows EXE version temporarily rewrites the drive's MBR so that the updater can control the procedure outside of a Windows environment. Afterwards the MBR should be restored by the updater, but this doesn't always work correctly.

Normally the updater will compare your drive's existing firmware package version (not the version on the label) against an update matrix in a configuration file. If there is no match, then the update doesn't proceed.

Here is an example:
http://www.users.on.net/~fzabkar/HDD/PH-CC3D.TXT

If the updater rejects your drive, then it is possible to forcibly update your firmware, but you must not apply the wrong firmware to the wrong model, and you must not mix certain firmware series. For example, you must not apply SDxx firmware to a CCxx 7200.11 drive. It is also potentially disastrous to apply retail firmware to an OEM drive.
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August 1, 2013 1:09:27 PM

Dear fzabkar,

I have the same problem.

How do you perform the CD ISO update?

Thanks.



fzabkar said:
The CD ISO would be the preferable update method. Seagate's Windows EXE version temporarily rewrites the drive's MBR so that the updater can control the procedure outside of a Windows environment. Afterwards the MBR should be restored by the updater, but this doesn't always work correctly.

Normally the updater will compare your drive's existing firmware package version (not the version on the label) against an update matrix in a configuration file. If there is no match, then the update doesn't proceed.

Here is an example:
http://www.users.on.net/~fzabkar/HDD/PH-CC3D.TXT

If the updater rejects your drive, then it is possible to forcibly update your firmware, but you must not apply the wrong firmware to the wrong model, and you must not mix certain firmware series. For example, you must not apply SDxx firmware to a CCxx 7200.11 drive. It is also potentially disastrous to apply retail firmware to an OEM drive.

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