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Migrating RAID from XP 32 to XP 64

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August 31, 2010 2:15:52 PM

Hello,
I am planning on installing XP 64 on a MSI P35 NEO2 FR system. The machine is currently running XP Pro with everything (including XP) on the Volume0 Raid5 array. I am looking to adding a new "C:" drive with XP 64, and then moving the Volume0 in as, a say "d:" Can I do this? The Raid is loaded with tons of photos.

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August 31, 2010 3:02:07 PM

It sounds like you know that upgrading from 32-bit to 64-bit is destructive. Creating a new C: drive is a good plan for the OS.

Assuming you're using motherboard RAID and not a RAID controller, you should be ok simply adding the disk in, as long as you select the correct drive when you install the OS. I assume, though, that the new C: drive is a different size from the RAID container, so it shouldn't be too much trouble.

I'd still take backups just in case, but I'm paranoid about that sort of thing.

Any particular reason you're going with XP 64 rather than Win 7 64?
August 31, 2010 3:17:33 PM

coldsleep said:
It sounds like you know that upgrading from 32-bit to 64-bit is destructive. Creating a new C: drive is a good plan for the OS.

Assuming you're using motherboard RAID and not a RAID controller, you should be ok simply adding the disk in, as long as you select the correct drive when you install the OS. I assume, though, that the new C: drive is a different size from the RAID container, so it shouldn't be too much trouble.

I'd still take backups just in case, but I'm paranoid about that sort of thing.

Any particular reason you're going with XP 64 rather than Win 7 64?


I "hate", yep "hate" the Win 7 interface. Tried it on another system for a month and deleted it.
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August 31, 2010 3:31:01 PM

Uncle_Jim said:
I "hate", yep "hate" the Win 7 interface. Tried it on another system for a month and deleted it.


You can convert it to a "classic" look if you want.

I'm primarily asking because from what I recall, XP 64 was pretty buggy, not to mention that it is going to be end-of-life much sooner than Win 7. If you still want to go with XP, that's cool, just offering options.
August 31, 2010 4:44:33 PM

coldsleep said:
You can convert it to a "classic" look if you want.

I'm primarily asking because from what I recall, XP 64 was pretty buggy, not to mention that it is going to be end-of-life much sooner than Win 7. If you still want to go with XP, that's cool, just offering options.


The 'classic' look just didn't look 'classic' enough to me. I guess I'm showing my old age here, but my first PC was a handwired PC that I had 1024 bits of memory and a 4040 processor, I wrote my own machine language operating system. I've been through CPM, DOS, UNIX, OS/2, Windows (never did BOB or Millineum!) and would really rather go to LINUX, if Adobe ever moved some of their industry standard Apps to it. I'm running XP 64 on a twin machine but with a RAID array, and it runs like a Rolex.
August 31, 2010 6:40:40 PM

Uncle_Jim said:
The 'classic' look just didn't look 'classic' enough to me. I guess I'm showing my old age here, but my first PC was a handwired PC that I had 1024 bits of memory and a 4040 processor, I wrote my own machine language operating system. I've been through CPM, DOS, UNIX, OS/2, Windows (never did BOB or Millineum!) and would really rather go to LINUX, if Adobe ever moved some of their industry standard Apps to it. I'm running XP 64 on a twin machine but with a RAID array, and it runs like a Rolex.


Fair enough. My first computer was a 286 clone, and I'm a UNIX/Linux systems admin, so I get where you're coming from. :)  (This is also probably where my backup paranoia comes from.)

As far as I know, you should be good with installing an OS to a new drive and then importing the RAID array. Unless the RAID container is a true software RAID in Windows, it should be entirely managed by the motherboard or the RAID card. If it's a Windows software RAID, then it's unlikely to survive the upgrade.

If you set the new drive as your first boot device (once the install is complete), I don't anticipate that you'll run into any problems.
August 31, 2010 11:50:25 PM

The other system doesn't have a RAID array. But as I reply on this one, XP 64 SP2 is downloading. The only hiccup was the goofy INTEL ICH9R driver that only loads via a floppy disk. So after I ran about a block down the road, I bought (gag) a 3.5" floppy and loaded up the RAID driver at the F6 point, and am just updating, loading apps, and listening to David Gilmore strumming "Comfortably Numb".

Interestingly enough, the INTEL RAID drivers are really weird, because they don't have a floppy disk controller on their motherboards, go figure.
August 31, 2010 11:58:23 PM

IMO XP 64 is something to avoid. There is very limited drive support for almost everything compared with Vista/7 64 or XP 32.
September 1, 2010 11:57:32 AM

In this case, I wasn't looking for an alternative. As you read above, the decision was already made. Sometimes the latest and greatest doesn't really provide a measurable advantage. I = E * (E-1). I is the number of interactions ( bells, whistles, gadgetry, and points of failure). E is the number of elements involved ( lines of code, function, hardware, applications, support structure, etc., etc.)
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