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Is a card reader the best way?

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January 1, 2005 4:00:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi,
This is my first time in this NG and I apologize if this is one of those
ancient questions. I am wondering if it is better to use the rather flimsy
USB cable connection to my camera or use a reader which may mean wear and
tear on the electrical contacts for the card. I do have a reader and enjoyed
using it with my Fuji SmartMedia camera. The camera is now in for repairs
due to read errors which are not the fault of the card itself.
There are lots of causes for this error but I am wondering if sliding the
card in and out is a bad thing. Any comments please?

Thanks
Bill

More about : card reader

Anonymous
January 1, 2005 8:42:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

billh wrote:
> Hi,
> This is my first time in this NG and I apologize if this is one of those
> ancient questions. I am wondering if it is better to use the rather flimsy
> USB cable connection to my camera or use a reader which may mean wear and
> tear on the electrical contacts for the card. I do have a reader and enjoyed
> using it with my Fuji SmartMedia camera. The camera is now in for repairs
> due to read errors which are not the fault of the card itself.
> There are lots of causes for this error but I am wondering if sliding the
> card in and out is a bad thing. Any comments please?
>
> Thanks
> Bill
>
>
In the case of SmartMedia (badly named, it is a 'dumb' format), you may
find that keeping the contacts clean is a concern. I haven't had a
problem with CF cards, and rarely with SD cards. I wouldn't worry too
much about it.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 9:45:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I have taken to using a card reader pretty much all the time. I have five
digital cameras that use CF or SD cards. I also have a new PC with a 9-in-1
USB 2.0 card reader built-in instead of a floppy drive. Transfering stills
and video is typically ten times faster, or more, with a USB 2.0 card reader
than from the camera. That's the main reason I do it. I shoot a lot of
stills and digital video, and really like the quick off-loading time with a
card reader.

Bye.

"billh" <NoMail@Post2Newsgroup.Pls> wrote in message
news:SABBd.69959$Tn1.2200465@news20.bellglobal.com...
> Hi,
> This is my first time in this NG and I apologize if this is one of those
> ancient questions. I am wondering if it is better to use the rather flimsy
> USB cable connection to my camera or use a reader which may mean wear and
> tear on the electrical contacts for the card. I do have a reader and
> enjoyed using it with my Fuji SmartMedia camera. The camera is now in for
> repairs due to read errors which are not the fault of the card itself.
> There are lots of causes for this error but I am wondering if sliding the
> card in and out is a bad thing. Any comments please?
>
> Thanks
> Bill
>
Related resources
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 9:45:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"David Sommers" <dsommers@acm.org> wrote in message
news:ScCBd.37932$nP1.9505@twister.socal.rr.com...
>I have taken to using a card reader pretty much all the time. I have five
>digital cameras that use CF or SD cards. I also have a new PC with a 9-in-1
>USB 2.0 card reader built-in instead of a floppy drive. Transfering stills
>and video is typically ten times faster, or more, with a USB 2.0 card
>reader than from the camera. That's the main reason I do it. I shoot a lot
>of stills and digital video, and really like the quick off-loading time
>with a card reader.
>
> Bye.
>
> "billh" <NoMail@Post2Newsgroup.Pls> wrote in message
> news:SABBd.69959$Tn1.2200465@news20.bellglobal.com...
>> Hi,
>> This is my first time in this NG and I apologize if this is one of those
>> ancient questions. I am wondering if it is better to use the rather
>> flimsy USB cable connection to my camera or use a reader which may mean
>> wear and tear on the electrical contacts for the card. I do have a reader
>> and enjoyed using it with my Fuji SmartMedia camera. The camera is now in
>> for repairs due to read errors which are not the fault of the card
>> itself.
>> There are lots of causes for this error but I am wondering if sliding the
>> card in and out is a bad thing. Any comments please?
>>
>> Thanks
>> Bill
I think it's a matter of convenience. As far as wear and tear, in order of
importance it would be, the cf card, usb connector on camera and finally
(and worst of all) the cf connector in the camera. As far as which is liable
to go first I have no idea. I imagine if you are careful, keep things clean
and never force anything there won't be any problems for the life of the
camera or card reader.
Dave Cohen
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 11:03:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

David Sommers <dsommers@acm.org> wrote:

> I have taken to using a card reader pretty much all the time. I have five
> digital cameras that use CF or SD cards. I also have a new PC with a 9-in-1
> USB 2.0 card reader built-in instead of a floppy drive. Transfering stills
> and video is typically ten times faster, or more, with a USB 2.0 card reader
> than from the camera. That's the main reason I do it. I shoot a lot of
> stills and digital video, and really like the quick off-loading time with a
> card reader.

Agreed with that lot. I had to use a card reader with my old Olympus
C960, as it didn't have USB, but it turned out to be the best option by
far.

I now still use a card reader for the SD cards on my Minolta too. Mind
you, the SD cards don't seem to have as much wear on the contacts as the
old SM cards used too, I can't see any marks on the contacts after a
year of use.

--
Andy Hewitt ** FAF#1, (Ex-OSOS#5) - FJ1200 ABS
Honda Civic 16v: Windows free zone (Mac G5 Dual Processor)
http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/thehewitts/index.ht...
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 11:17:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

billh wrote:

> Hi,
> This is my first time in this NG and I apologize if this is one of those
> ancient questions. I am wondering if it is better to use the rather flimsy
> USB cable connection to my camera or use a reader which may mean wear and
> tear on the electrical contacts for the card.

This has been "debated" as recently as yesterday. There are many views
to this apparently simple choice, some reaching religious fervor.

Please let's not start another tiresome long thread here. You'll find
several threads of very recent vintage.

--
John McWilliams
January 2, 2005 1:39:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Use a card reader all the way. The flash card won't get damaged with regular
use and will outlast the use. Most of them have a lifetime warranty on them
anyway (at least the brand names do). I never use my camera for transferring
photos....the camera stays in the bag and only comes out when pictures need
to be taken.

"billh" <NoMail@Post2Newsgroup.Pls> wrote in message
news:SABBd.69959$Tn1.2200465@news20.bellglobal.com...
> Hi,
> This is my first time in this NG and I apologize if this is one of those
> ancient questions. I am wondering if it is better to use the rather flimsy
> USB cable connection to my camera or use a reader which may mean wear and
> tear on the electrical contacts for the card. I do have a reader and
enjoyed
> using it with my Fuji SmartMedia camera. The camera is now in for repairs
> due to read errors which are not the fault of the card itself.
> There are lots of causes for this error but I am wondering if sliding the
> card in and out is a bad thing. Any comments please?
>
> Thanks
> Bill
>
>
January 2, 2005 9:14:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I've found that removing/replacing the card in my camera
to be a rather clumsy operation.

In contrast, connecting the USB cable is a snap.

With a large capacity card,
how often do you have to xfer pics ?







On Sat, 1 Jan 2005 13:00:02 -0500, "billh" <NoMail@Post2Newsgroup.Pls>
wrote:

>Hi,
>This is my first time in this NG and I apologize if this is one of those
>ancient questions. I am wondering if it is better to use the rather flimsy
>USB cable connection to my camera or use a reader which may mean wear and
>tear on the electrical contacts for the card. I do have a reader and enjoyed
>using it with my Fuji SmartMedia camera. The camera is now in for repairs
>due to read errors which are not the fault of the card itself.
>There are lots of causes for this error but I am wondering if sliding the
>card in and out is a bad thing. Any comments please?
>
>Thanks
>Bill
>

<rj>
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 8:14:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<RJ> wrote:
> I've found that removing/replacing the card in my camera
> to be a rather clumsy operation.
>
> In contrast, connecting the USB cable is a snap.
>
> With a large capacity card,
> how often do you have to xfer pics ?
>
Both ways, or even a combo of them, are fine. I transfer pix from a
large capacity card after most shoots, be it a few images, or hundreds.

I usually reformat just prior to the next series.

--
John Mcwilliams
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 7:16:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 1 Jan 2005 20:03:10 +0000, hairy.biker@spamcop.net (Andy
Hewitt) wrote:

>David Sommers <dsommers@acm.org> wrote:
>
>> I have taken to using a card reader pretty much all the time. I have five
>> digital cameras that use CF or SD cards. I also have a new PC with a 9-in-1
>> USB 2.0 card reader built-in instead of a floppy drive. Transfering stills
>> and video is typically ten times faster, or more, with a USB 2.0 card reader
>> than from the camera. That's the main reason I do it. I shoot a lot of
>> stills and digital video, and really like the quick off-loading time with a
>> card reader.
>
>Agreed with that lot. I had to use a card reader with my old Olympus
>C960, as it didn't have USB, but it turned out to be the best option by
>far.
>
>I now still use a card reader for the SD cards on my Minolta too. Mind
>you, the SD cards don't seem to have as much wear on the contacts as the
>old SM cards used too, I can't see any marks on the contacts after a
>year of use.


I started out with a card reader, as I had an old Win95 computer when
I got my first digital camera. (Olympus C-3030) I got a parallel port
card reader to do the job.

As for wear and tear, I used my original smartmedia cards for 3 years
with that card reader and no problems.

I did have trouble once I bought a new computer with corresponding new
card reader (Dazzle), it destroyed several cards.

I finally ended up with a SanDisk reader and no problems.

I wouldn't worry too much, I don't think the wear is that great. My
old SM cards, before being ruined by the Dazzle reader, were in and
out of my SanDisk parallel port reader a LOT!

Cynthia
January 5, 2005 8:30:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I know compact flash cards are made for high use and can withstand alot of
abuse. Their design is made for this...but I am not sure about other media
cards. I would hate to rely on a SD card or SM card. A little too fragile
for me...specially when using my cameras in the field. For information on
compact flash cards and pretty much anything about, try www.compactflash.org


"Cynthia P" <graycyn@netzero.net> wrote in message
news:mjpot0teu6se03fimng346n8v9chgmu81p@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 1 Jan 2005 20:03:10 +0000, hairy.biker@spamcop.net (Andy
> Hewitt) wrote:
>
> >David Sommers <dsommers@acm.org> wrote:
> >
> >> I have taken to using a card reader pretty much all the time. I have
five
> >> digital cameras that use CF or SD cards. I also have a new PC with a
9-in-1
> >> USB 2.0 card reader built-in instead of a floppy drive. Transfering
stills
> >> and video is typically ten times faster, or more, with a USB 2.0 card
reader
> >> than from the camera. That's the main reason I do it. I shoot a lot of
> >> stills and digital video, and really like the quick off-loading time
with a
> >> card reader.
> >
> >Agreed with that lot. I had to use a card reader with my old Olympus
> >C960, as it didn't have USB, but it turned out to be the best option by
> >far.
> >
> >I now still use a card reader for the SD cards on my Minolta too. Mind
> >you, the SD cards don't seem to have as much wear on the contacts as the
> >old SM cards used too, I can't see any marks on the contacts after a
> >year of use.
>
>
> I started out with a card reader, as I had an old Win95 computer when
> I got my first digital camera. (Olympus C-3030) I got a parallel port
> card reader to do the job.
>
> As for wear and tear, I used my original smartmedia cards for 3 years
> with that card reader and no problems.
>
> I did have trouble once I bought a new computer with corresponding new
> card reader (Dazzle), it destroyed several cards.
>
> I finally ended up with a SanDisk reader and no problems.
>
> I wouldn't worry too much, I don't think the wear is that great. My
> old SM cards, before being ruined by the Dazzle reader, were in and
> out of my SanDisk parallel port reader a LOT!
>
> Cynthia
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 4:00:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
computer?

Lori
March 1, 2005 4:00:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <2ef721pl3onsihbgpp5j7qcgfklianvr1k@4ax.com>, afwt_@hotmail.com
says...
> I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
> the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
> camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
> computer?
>
> Lori
>
>
>

If you need to ask about it then you are probably better off using the camera
to clear the card.

YES: you can do it with the computer

YES: if you dont know EXACTLY how or why you might harm the card, you are
better off using the camera.

Now if you wnt to know why, here it is (simplified and in a nutshell)

Some cameras are more "finicky" than others about the condition of the file
structure on the memory card, and might just fail to perform perfectly if the
files aren't EXACTLY the arangement the camera expects.

If you remove the pictures with a computer, it may leave "fragments" of the
files on the chip, and these file fragments might "confuse" or crash the
firmware trying to read it.

I remove files from memory cards with the computer all the time, but I have
made it a point to know what file system each of my cameras use (FAT, FAT 32,
et, al). So if I "screw it up" I can reformat the memory card and go from
there.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 4:04:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Kayla wrote:
> I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
> the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
> camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
> computer?
>
> Lori
>
>
In general, it is better to delete on the camera. However, I have been
doing it on the computer for a couple of years with no problems. It
depends, it would seem, on the particular brand of camera.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 4:54:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 01:00:24 GMT, Kayla <afwt_@hotmail.com> wrote:

>I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
>the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
>camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
>computer?
>
>Lori
>
>
Nope you can delete them through the computer if you wish. I know
someone who does not copy them over but simply loads them off so he
does not have to take the second step to delete in camera (not wise
IMHO due to possibility of transfer errors)
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 6:34:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>If you need to ask about it then you are probably better off using the camera
>to clear the card.

I had used the computer to clear the pictures but then read on this
newsgroup that deleting the pictures should always be done via the
camera.

Thanks for the explanation.

Lori
March 1, 2005 6:34:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <oeo72199o3hnsa04qrpnemqh2gb4av7asf@4ax.com>, afwt_@hotmail.com
says...
>
> >If you need to ask about it then you are probably better off using the camera
> >to clear the card.
>
> I had used the computer to clear the pictures but then read on this
> newsgroup that deleting the pictures should always be done via the
> camera.
>
> Thanks for the explanation.
>
> Lori
>
>
>
>
>
>

Some of us tend to forget that everybody that uses a Digital Camera isnt a
"computer Commando", so I try to answer what might be a "simple" computer
question for me in a way that non-computer people can understand.

I hope I was clear.


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 6:57:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Kayla" <afwt_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:o eo72199o3hnsa04qrpnemqh2gb4av7asf@4ax.com...
>
>>If you need to ask about it then you are probably better off using the
>>camera
>>to clear the card.
>
> I had used the computer to clear the pictures but then read on this
> newsgroup that deleting the pictures should always be done via the
> camera.
>
> Thanks for the explanation.
>
> Lori

Don't pay too much attention to Larry, a proven usenet pedofile
who uses digicams for his perverted sessions.
March 1, 2005 9:22:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <z4WUd.497$w85.358@bignews3.bellsouth.net>, dutchwings@bbnet.com
says...
>
> "Kayla" <afwt_@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:o eo72199o3hnsa04qrpnemqh2gb4av7asf@4ax.com...
> >
> >>If you need to ask about it then you are probably better off using the
> >>camera
> >>to clear the card.
> >
> > I had used the computer to clear the pictures but then read on this
> > newsgroup that deleting the pictures should always be done via the
> > camera.
> >
> > Thanks for the explanation.
> >
> > Lori
>
> Don't pay too much attention to Larry, a proven usenet pedofile
> who uses digicams for his perverted sessions.
>
>
>


I think, since you dont bother to mung your header, you should be carefull
about what you say.

You have been reported to abuse@bellsouth.

You have confused me with someone you know perhaps???


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 11:37:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Kayla wrote:

> I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
> the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
> camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
> computer?
>
> Lori
>
>
I never do it in my camera. Why use camera battery juice? My desktop
plugs into wall, so I am not using battery. It takes a surprising amount
of power to reset a flash card.

In your computer the card looks just like a hard drive. Select any or
all files you want to delete, and select delete or hit delete key.
March 1, 2005 12:38:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

billh wrote:

> Hi,
> This is my first time in this NG and I apologize if this is one of those
> ancient questions. I am wondering if it is better to use the rather flimsy
> USB cable connection to my camera or use a reader which may mean wear and
> tear on the electrical contacts for the card. I do have a reader and enjoyed
> using it with my Fuji SmartMedia camera. The camera is now in for repairs
> due to read errors which are not the fault of the card itself.
> There are lots of causes for this error but I am wondering if sliding the
> card in and out is a bad thing. Any comments please?


Ah, so much advice. My advice is to format (not erase) in the camera. It
is much faster to format and guarantees a clean card. So fast that it's
little battery drain. Erasing is messy, incomplete and slow.
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 1:29:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Don Stauffer in Minneapolis wrote:
> Kayla wrote:
>
>> I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
>> the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
>> camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
>> computer?
>>
>> Lori
>>
>>
> I never do it in my camera. Why use camera battery juice? My desktop
> plugs into wall, so I am not using battery. It takes a surprising amount
> of power to reset a flash card.
>
> In your computer the card looks just like a hard drive. Select any or
> all files you want to delete, and select delete or hit delete key.

Some cameras are very picky about what file structure they find on the
camera. If you delete something other than the picture files, then the
camera may reject the card. If your camera isn't one of these picky
ones, it probably doesn't matter. I have had no problem with two Kodak
cameras, but that is a rather limited sample. One can't go wrong with
formatting in the camera, battery use notwithstanding.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 1:31:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 10:29:15 -0600, Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net>
wrote:

>Don Stauffer in Minneapolis wrote:
>> Kayla wrote:
>>
>>> I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
>>> the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
>>> camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
>>> computer?
>>>
>>> Lori
>>>
>>>
>> I never do it in my camera. Why use camera battery juice? My desktop
>> plugs into wall, so I am not using battery. It takes a surprising amount
>> of power to reset a flash card.
>>
>> In your computer the card looks just like a hard drive. Select any or
>> all files you want to delete, and select delete or hit delete key.
>
>Some cameras are very picky about what file structure they find on the
>camera. If you delete something other than the picture files, then the
>camera may reject the card. If your camera isn't one of these picky
>ones, it probably doesn't matter. I have had no problem with two Kodak
>cameras, but that is a rather limited sample. One can't go wrong with
>formatting in the camera, battery use notwithstanding.

I fail to see why batter use is even an issue. Just pop in a fully
charged battery before you do the format.


*******************************************************

"Les livres font les époques et les nations,
commes les époques et les nations font les livres."

_Mélanges littéraires_
Jean-Jacques Ampère
(1800-1864)
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 7:37:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> I had used the computer to clear the pictures but then read on this
> newsgroup that deleting the pictures should always be done via the
> camera.

And what is an exact reason to avoid card readers? Any particular or just
impresion?

Regards,

K.Polak
Anonymous
March 1, 2005 7:37:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Krystian Polak wrote:
>> I had used the computer to clear the pictures but then read on this
>> newsgroup that deleting the pictures should always be done via the
>> camera.
>
> And what is an exact reason to avoid card readers? Any particular or
> just impresion?

It's not avoiding a card reader as such, but allowing an operating system
other than the camera to format the card. Cameras typically only use
FAT-16. At least one OS will format small cards (e.g. 8MB) to FAT-12 and
large cards to FAT-32, rendering them unusable in the camera. The OS may
also place hidden files or directories on the card, thereby reducing its
capacity.

Thus the best general-purpose advice is: "Always format the card in the
camera".

David
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 2:34:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Don Stauffer in Minneapolis" <stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote in message
news:38jd14F5nfmueU2@individual.net...
>
> I never do it in my camera. Why use camera battery juice? My desktop
> plugs into wall, so I am not using battery. It takes a surprising amount
> of power to reset a flash card.


I can't imagine much power is used in the 1/2 second or so it takes my D70
to format a 512MB CF card.....

Good shooting,
Bob Scott
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 4:14:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <2ef721pl3onsihbgpp5j7qcgfklianvr1k@4ax.com>,
Kayla <afwt_@hotmail.com> wrote:

> I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
> the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
> camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
> computer?
>
Yes. You can delete them in the pooter or with iPhoto but this would be
a BAD move. The pooter won't actually delete all the EXIF info that
comes along with the pic and erasure may just isolate sections of the
media making the capacity smaller. The best thing to do is use the
'Erase all images' function in the camera or simply format the media.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 4:14:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stewy wrote:
> In article <2ef721pl3onsihbgpp5j7qcgfklianvr1k@4ax.com>,
> Kayla <afwt_@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
>>the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
>>camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
>>computer?
>>
>
> Yes. You can delete them in the pooter or with iPhoto but this would be
> a BAD move. The pooter won't actually delete all the EXIF info that
> comes along with the pic and erasure may just isolate sections of the
> media making the capacity smaller. The best thing to do is use the
> 'Erase all images' function in the camera or simply format the media.

Stewy,
I believe that EXIF data is including IN the files. Macs may store
data differently, but I believe all cameras use the PC file format.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 6:08:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <6N0Vd.2662$yJ5.166@fe04.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> Stewy wrote:
> > In article <2ef721pl3onsihbgpp5j7qcgfklianvr1k@4ax.com>,
> > Kayla <afwt_@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >
> >>I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
> >>the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
> >>camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
> >>computer?
> >>
> >
> > Yes. You can delete them in the pooter or with iPhoto but this would be
> > a BAD move. The pooter won't actually delete all the EXIF info that
> > comes along with the pic and erasure may just isolate sections of the
> > media making the capacity smaller. The best thing to do is use the
> > 'Erase all images' function in the camera or simply format the media.
>
> Stewy,
> I believe that EXIF data is including IN the files. Macs may store
> data differently, but I believe all cameras use the PC file format.

SOMETHING gets left behind if you delete on the Mac, I can't think of
anything else that it would be.

If I erase the contents of a usb-drive in the Mac, the same thing
happens - something remains.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 6:08:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stewy wrote:
> In article <6N0Vd.2662$yJ5.166@fe04.lga>,
> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Stewy wrote:
>>
>>>In article <2ef721pl3onsihbgpp5j7qcgfklianvr1k@4ax.com>,
>>> Kayla <afwt_@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
>>>>the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
>>>>camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
>>>>computer?
>>>>
>>>
>>>Yes. You can delete them in the pooter or with iPhoto but this would be
>>>a BAD move. The pooter won't actually delete all the EXIF info that
>>>comes along with the pic and erasure may just isolate sections of the
>>>media making the capacity smaller. The best thing to do is use the
>>>'Erase all images' function in the camera or simply format the media.
>>
>>Stewy,
>> I believe that EXIF data is including IN the files. Macs may store
>>data differently, but I believe all cameras use the PC file format.
>
>
> SOMETHING gets left behind if you delete on the Mac, I can't think of
> anything else that it would be.
>
> If I erase the contents of a usb-drive in the Mac, the same thing
> happens - something remains.

What is this 'something' that remains?


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 6:08:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <g4dVd.2741$WT6.1803@fe04.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>Stewy wrote:
>>
>> SOMETHING gets left behind if you delete on the Mac, I can't think of
>> anything else that it would be.
>>
>> If I erase the contents of a usb-drive in the Mac, the same thing
>> happens - something remains.
>
>What is this 'something' that remains?

He's probably talking about Finder metadata, which gets stored in hidden
files. It's a serious pain with my 10D because the camera won't remove old
directories when it deletes the last image, because they aren't empty.

I do wish there was some way to tell OS X not to leave these little
droppings lying around on removable devices.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 6:08:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Chris Brown wrote:
> In article <g4dVd.2741$WT6.1803@fe04.lga>,
> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>>Stewy wrote:
>>
>>>SOMETHING gets left behind if you delete on the Mac, I can't think of
>>>anything else that it would be.
>>>
>>>If I erase the contents of a usb-drive in the Mac, the same thing
>>>happens - something remains.
>>
>>What is this 'something' that remains?
>
>
> He's probably talking about Finder metadata, which gets stored in hidden
> files. It's a serious pain with my 10D because the camera won't remove old
> directories when it deletes the last image, because they aren't empty.
>
> I do wish there was some way to tell OS X not to leave these little
> droppings lying around on removable devices.

What, the perfect Mac, and it's perfect OS have flaws? Imagine! Seems
that it would clean up its mess after deleting the file. That's as bad
as many PC programs that fail to delete their registry entries when they
are uninstalled. One can look in the registry and see a virtual catalog
catalog of every program ever installed on a PC unless a registry
'cleaner' program has been installed. Looks like Mac OS leaves these
tracks all over the disk..


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 6:08:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <QijVd.2984$%A2.2973@fe04.lga>, Ron Hunter
<rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> What, the perfect Mac, and it's perfect OS have flaws? Imagine! Seems
> that it would clean up its mess after deleting the file. That's as bad
> as many PC programs that fail to delete their registry entries when they
> are uninstalled. One can look in the registry and see a virtual catalog
> catalog of every program ever installed on a PC unless a registry
> 'cleaner' program has been installed. Looks like Mac OS leaves these
> tracks all over the disk..

Looks like you need to learn what you're talking about.

And how difficult is it to just format the damned card in the camera?
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 6:08:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> In article <QijVd.2984$%A2.2973@fe04.lga>, Ron Hunter
> <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>
>>What, the perfect Mac, and it's perfect OS have flaws? Imagine! Seems
>>that it would clean up its mess after deleting the file. That's as bad
>>as many PC programs that fail to delete their registry entries when they
>>are uninstalled. One can look in the registry and see a virtual catalog
>>catalog of every program ever installed on a PC unless a registry
>>'cleaner' program has been installed. Looks like Mac OS leaves these
>>tracks all over the disk..
>
>
> Looks like you need to learn what you're talking about.
>
> And how difficult is it to just format the damned card in the camera?

Not hard, of course, but aren't you avoiding the question?


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 6:09:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <tBUUd.433$Db5.195@fe07.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> Kayla wrote:
> > I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
> > the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
> > camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
> > computer?
> >
> > Lori
> >
> >
> In general, it is better to delete on the camera. However, I have been
> doing it on the computer for a couple of years with no problems. It
> depends, it would seem, on the particular brand of camera.

Or, perhaps if it's Mac or PC.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 6:09:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stewy wrote:
> In article <tBUUd.433$Db5.195@fe07.lga>,
> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Kayla wrote:
>>
>>>I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
>>>the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
>>>camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
>>>computer?
>>>
>>>Lori
>>>
>>>
>>
>>In general, it is better to delete on the camera. However, I have been
>>doing it on the computer for a couple of years with no problems. It
>>depends, it would seem, on the particular brand of camera.
>
>
> Or, perhaps if it's Mac or PC.

I don't think the Mac/PC difference is really an issue in this case.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 6:09:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 15:09:08 +0900, Stewy <anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> wrote:

>> In general, it is better to delete on the camera. However, I have been
>> doing it on the computer for a couple of years with no problems. It
>> depends, it would seem, on the particular brand of camera.

I disagree. In general, it's best (i.e., safest) to make a CD-R of the raw
images as the very first step, to avoid disaster while manipulating images. Then
go ahead and edit, including deleting images, as much as you want on your PC.

The more you do on a memory card -- or in a camera -- the greater the chance of
image loss.

-- Larry
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 8:46:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I copy my pictures from the camera card to the pc via a card reader.

I keep the pictures in several locations on my pc as well as to a cod-raw.
That way I can manipulate the pictures on the pc and still have copies of
the original camera disk. I believe in safety.

I also keep a partition for backup files only and keep a copy of my original
pictures there as well.

Having lost my drive a long time ago I have found you can't have too many
backups.


"Stewy" <anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:anyone4tennis-AD6BE7.15080102032005@newssv.kcn.ne.jp...
> In article <6N0Vd.2662$yJ5.166@fe04.lga>,
> Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
>
>> Stewy wrote:
>> > In article <2ef721pl3onsihbgpp5j7qcgfklianvr1k@4ax.com>,
>> > Kayla <afwt_@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> >
>> >
>> >>I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
>> >>the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
>> >>camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
>> >>computer?
>> >>
>> >
>> > Yes. You can delete them in the pooter or with iPhoto but this would be
>> > a BAD move. The pooter won't actually delete all the EXIF info that
>> > comes along with the pic and erasure may just isolate sections of the
>> > media making the capacity smaller. The best thing to do is use the
>> > 'Erase all images' function in the camera or simply format the media.
>>
>> Stewy,
>> I believe that EXIF data is including IN the files. Macs may store
>> data differently, but I believe all cameras use the PC file format.
>
> SOMETHING gets left behind if you delete on the Mac, I can't think of
> anything else that it would be.
>
> If I erase the contents of a usb-drive in the Mac, the same thing
> happens - something remains.
Anonymous
March 2, 2005 9:25:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <U5pVd.3408$nT7.1412@fe04.lga>, Ron Hunter
<rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> > In article <QijVd.2984$%A2.2973@fe04.lga>, Ron Hunter
> > <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
> >
> >
> >>What, the perfect Mac, and it's perfect OS have flaws? Imagine! Seems
> >>that it would clean up its mess after deleting the file. That's as bad
> >>as many PC programs that fail to delete their registry entries when they
> >>are uninstalled. One can look in the registry and see a virtual catalog
> >>catalog of every program ever installed on a PC unless a registry
> >>'cleaner' program has been installed. Looks like Mac OS leaves these
> >>tracks all over the disk..
> >
> >
> > Looks like you need to learn what you're talking about.
> >
> > And how difficult is it to just format the damned card in the camera?
>
> Not hard, of course, but aren't you avoiding the question?

What's the question? Just put the card in the camera and format it -
like it was designed to be done. What's the point of dinking around
deleting pictures one at at ime?
March 3, 2005 12:56:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 00:30:15 -0600
In message <g4dVd.2741$WT6.1803@fe04.lga>
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> > ...
> > SOMETHING gets left behind if you delete on the Mac,
> > I can't think of anything else that it would be.
> >
> > If I erase the contents of a usb-drive in the Mac,
> > the same thing happens - something remains.
>
> What is this 'something' that remains?

A file named (from memory, exact filenames may be different)
".trashes" that has the same purpose as the "RECYCLED" directory (and
files) under windozer. It can be reduced to a very small file by
emptying the trash before ejecting the device using the Finder on a
MAC.

There are ".ds_store" files that are small with a similar function as
the "desktop.ini -- whateveritis" files that windozer sprinkles around
your disks depending on the phases of the moon. ;) 

In reality, since the drives and cards are all DOS formatted each of
these small files uses a cluster of card/disk space, and could reduce
the total picture count over time as they accumulate if the camera
makes directories every 100 photos.

The advice of "format in the camera" is good advice and is quick (as
others have pointed out). It rewrites the directory structure (which
is also a quick write test of the card in the camera...a good idea in
itself). And, since the camera's menu system is used to format a
card, make a habit of checking the camera settings, especially the
ISO, while you are in a non-photo taking frame of mind.

(The error I make most often is shooting using the wrong
ISO...dang-nabit...it should be always displayed next to the f/stop
and shutter speed. It's not as if we're using film here. ;-)

5-10 seconds of your time is good insurance that the camera is ready
to go in the mode you want to start in. ;) 


Jeff
March 3, 2005 1:00:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 17:46:00 GMT
In message <sZmVd.38647$ya6.11903@trndny01>
"Bullwinkle. J. Moose" <moose.nyc@nospam.verizon.net> wrote:

> ...
> Having lost my drive a long time ago I have found
> you can't have too many backups.

Indeed. It's not a matter of IF a drive will
fail, but WHEN. Backup often to different
devices as well as CD or DVD.

"Old School" advice that's as valid today
as it was in the stone age of mainframes.

Jeff
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 3:20:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bullwinkle. J. Moose wrote:
> I copy my pictures from the camera card to the pc via a card reader.
>
> I keep the pictures in several locations on my pc as well as to a
> cod-raw.

cod-raw - some type of Babel-fish?
March 3, 2005 3:46:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 10:29:15 -0600, Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net>
wrote:

>Don Stauffer in Minneapolis wrote:
>> Kayla wrote:
>>
>>> I use a card reader to view my pictures on the computer but was under
>>> the impression that I must delete the pictures on my card through the
>>> camera. Am I right or can I delete them from the card through my
>>> computer?
>>>
>>> Lori
>>>
>>>
>> I never do it in my camera. Why use camera battery juice? My desktop
>> plugs into wall, so I am not using battery. It takes a surprising amount
>> of power to reset a flash card.
>>
>> In your computer the card looks just like a hard drive. Select any or
>> all files you want to delete, and select delete or hit delete key.
>
>Some cameras are very picky about what file structure they find on the
>camera. If you delete something other than the picture files, then the
>camera may reject the card. If your camera isn't one of these picky
>ones, it probably doesn't matter. I have had no problem with two Kodak
>cameras, but that is a rather limited sample. One can't go wrong with
>formatting in the camera, battery use notwithstanding.

Just curious, do you delete just the files or also the folders the
camera puts on the card?

Dave - DX6490
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 12:12:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dave wrote:
[]
> Just curious, do you delete just the files or also the folders the
> camera puts on the card?
>
> Dave - DX6490

I do neither - just format in the camera.

David
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 12:12:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

David J Taylor wrote:
> Dave wrote:
> []
>
>>Just curious, do you delete just the files or also the folders the
>>camera puts on the card?
>>
>>Dave - DX6490
>
>
> I do neither - just format in the camera.
>
> David
>
>
I delete only the picture files.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 2:35:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <QijVd.2984$%A2.2973@fe04.lga>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:

> Chris Brown wrote:
> > In article <g4dVd.2741$WT6.1803@fe04.lga>,
> > Ron Hunter <rphunter@charter.net> wrote:
> >
> >>Stewy wrote:
> >>
> >>>SOMETHING gets left behind if you delete on the Mac, I can't think of
> >>>anything else that it would be.
> >>>
> >>>If I erase the contents of a usb-drive in the Mac, the same thing
> >>>happens - something remains.
> >>
> >>What is this 'something' that remains?
> >
> >
> > He's probably talking about Finder metadata, which gets stored in hidden
> > files. It's a serious pain with my 10D because the camera won't remove old
> > directories when it deletes the last image, because they aren't empty.
> >
> > I do wish there was some way to tell OS X not to leave these little
> > droppings lying around on removable devices.
>
> What, the perfect Mac, and it's perfect OS have flaws? Imagine! Seems
> that it would clean up its mess after deleting the file. That's as bad
> as many PC programs that fail to delete their registry entries when they
> are uninstalled. One can look in the registry and see a virtual catalog
> catalog of every program ever installed on a PC unless a registry
> 'cleaner' program has been installed. Looks like Mac OS leaves these
> tracks all over the disk..

Like the religious fundamentalists, long-term Mac users are in a state
of denial - No problems happen to Mac, if there is, then YOU'RE doing
something wrong! Virus writers ignore Mac 'cause there are 19 PCs for
every one Mac. Mac OSX (at least to Jaguar 10.2) is klunky - in a
different way to a PC but klunky all the same. Cleaning out Windows
folders after deleting a program is a pain-in-the-***, with the Mac you
just drag the program to the garbage and all the connecting files go
with it, but not if you start using applications to delete files.

Macintosh did realise it's 'Classic' OS was a dead-end street and Unix
was the way forward. It's a pity Microsoft has not tried to clean up
Windows by getting rid of it's DOS based platform and going the Unix way
too, but then, if Windows and OSX becomes compatible someone is going to
lose money.
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 2:35:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <anyone4tennis-AF46C4.11355103032005@newssv.kcn.ne.jp>,
Stewy <anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Like the religious fundamentalists, long-term Mac users are in a state
> of denial - No problems happen to Mac, if there is, then YOU'RE doing
> something wrong! Virus writers ignore Mac 'cause there are 19 PCs for
> every one Mac. Mac OSX (at least to Jaguar 10.2) is klunky - in a
> different way to a PC but klunky all the same. Cleaning out Windows
> folders after deleting a program is a pain-in-the-***, with the Mac you
> just drag the program to the garbage and all the connecting files go
> with it, but not if you start using applications to delete files.

No, virus writers avoid Mac because OS X requires the admin password to
install a program - unlike Windows which blindly installs any old
thing.

> Macintosh did realise it's 'Classic' OS was a dead-end street and Unix
> was the way forward. It's a pity Microsoft has not tried to clean up
> Windows by getting rid of it's DOS based platform and going the Unix way
> too, but then, if Windows and OSX becomes compatible someone is going to
> lose money.

The real question is - will Longhorn be even more putrid looking than
XP?
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 2:35:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stewy wrote:
[]
> Macintosh did realise it's 'Classic' OS was a dead-end street and Unix
> was the way forward. It's a pity Microsoft has not tried to clean up
> Windows by getting rid of it's DOS based platform and going the Unix
> way too, but then, if Windows and OSX becomes compatible someone is
> going to lose money.

Windows NT, 2000, 2003 and XP are no longer based on DOS. The kernel they
use can (?could) host POSIX applications if you need that compatibility,
and the services for UNIX software is available free allowing you to run
UNIX applications under Windows.

David
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 2:35:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Randall Ainsworth wrote:
> In article <anyone4tennis-AF46C4.11355103032005@newssv.kcn.ne.jp>,
> Stewy <anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Like the religious fundamentalists, long-term Mac users are in a state
>>of denial - No problems happen to Mac, if there is, then YOU'RE doing
>>something wrong! Virus writers ignore Mac 'cause there are 19 PCs for
>>every one Mac. Mac OSX (at least to Jaguar 10.2) is klunky - in a
>>different way to a PC but klunky all the same. Cleaning out Windows
>>folders after deleting a program is a pain-in-the-***, with the Mac you
>>just drag the program to the garbage and all the connecting files go
>>with it, but not if you start using applications to delete files.
>
>
> No, virus writers avoid Mac because OS X requires the admin password to
> install a program - unlike Windows which blindly installs any old
> thing.

The trick is to get the user to install the program under some pretext
or other. Mac users are no less gullible than PC users when it comes to
these schemes.
>
>
>>Macintosh did realise it's 'Classic' OS was a dead-end street and Unix
>>was the way forward. It's a pity Microsoft has not tried to clean up
>>Windows by getting rid of it's DOS based platform and going the Unix way
>>too, but then, if Windows and OSX becomes compatible someone is going to
>>lose money.
>
>
> The real question is - will Longhorn be even more putrid looking than
> XP?

I am sure that in YOUR opinion, it will be. However, everyone has
different standards of beauty, and some people even think a painting by
Picasso is art.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 5:25:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Almost all the time, IME, you can easily delete all of the files &
folders on the card using any flash reader just like you can delete pics
on the camera.

Almost all the time, on a blank card, you can recreate the same folder
name the camera uses, drop original copies of the digital images right
back in, and they'll play fine on the digicam.

Same as above works for newer digicams where they show up as removable
external drives when plugged into PC with a USB cable.

Doesn't matter for PCs. On Macs, you do have to be careful - OS X adds
many Mac specific files (which aren't normally visible if you view the
card under a Mac), but will show up on a PC when you view ALL files on
the flash card. These may interfere - simply delete them.

Mitsumi 7-in-1 3.5" Floppy Drive + flash card reader for <$40 at
Compusa, XPCGear and other sites do fabulous for PC desktops. Takes no
more space than the regular floppy drive, but adds full flash card
read/write w/o having to use a USB flash card reader thingy at all.
Highly recommended and works great here.
!