What PSU do you recommend for i5 760

I just pick up i5 760 at Microcenter this evening. I'll be running 24/7 crunching Folding@Home and others. What would you recommend that I should buy.

Corsair HX 750
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139010

Corsair AX750
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139016
14 answers Last reply
More about what recommend
  1. Either is likely fine. Really need to know your other components, especially GPU. And future upgrade plans, if any.
  2. You gotta give your full system specs. It's not just the CPU that consumes power.
  3. A good 550 such as a Corsair 550VX will power just about any "normal" consumer system with any CPU and single GPU video card.
  4. Are you kidding? Whats the TDP of the 760? 95W? If you grabbed a mobo with onboard GPU you could use a 250W PSU. Why are you looking at 750s? Actually, if this is a pure folding/crunching machine this is a good idea. Mate it with a P55 board that has an IGP and buy a quality/high efficient PSU. 350W would be more then enough. That way this 24/7 machine doesn't chew up to much electricity.
  5. The components with i5 760.

    Asus P7P55D-E Pro
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131621

    G.Skill Ripjaws 4GB DDR3 1600 CAS Latency 7
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231303

    Sapphire 5870 - Yes, I am going to Crossfire
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102883

    Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822152185

    Sony Optiarc DVD Burner
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827118039

    Scythe SCMG-2100 CPU Cooler
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835185142

    I have a question that is not related to this. But how do I put the hyperlink with the component names instead of using website address but it goes through that website for the component.
  6. Look for a PSU that has 45-50A on the 12V rail. (12V * 50A = 600W on the 12V rail) A seasonic or Corsair 650W will be the minimum you'll want.
  7. If you're looking to SLI your 5870's, I would go with 750, or 850 if you can afford it. The XFX 750/850 are exceptional power supplies that go for much cheaper than the Corsair equivalent (both XFX's are modular). The 750w one is almost 70 dollars cheaper.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207003

    The review that changed my mind about XFX vs. Corsair:

    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story&reid=184
  8. This is exactly why I had asked you to list your specs. You were being advised to get a 250/350/450/550 watt PSU for what turns out to be a 5870 CrossFire system. Oh! Well.

    Point 1. 750 Watts is enough. You don't need 850. Especially a Corsair. I haven't checked, but both should have enough amperage on their +12V Rails (60-65, I'd assume) to run a system with the aforementioned configuration.

    Point 2. For a 24/7 system, it makes a lot of sense to go with a gold rated PSU, rather than a silver/bronze. Especially at just 30 bucks extra. Better efficiency certainly won't hurt. The AX does it then, IMO.
  9. Save yourself some money and go with the HX 750. It got an excellent review on hardwaresecrets: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Corsair-HX750W-Power-Supply-Review/775

    (An excellent site for PSU reviews, by the way.)

    They also state that it could have qualified for gold standard efficiency, but was just over spec so Corsair decided to market it as silver. Further, Hardwaresecrets was able to pull 900 W from the unit but points out that at that level the efficiency is "only" 83%, below 80+ gold standards.

    EDIT: Here is a link to the 80+ site showing that the CMPSU-750HX is indeed Gold certified, with a 90.02% efficiency at typical load: http://www.80plus.org/manu/psu/psu_detail.aspx?id=25&type=2
    More detailed: http://www.80plus.org/manu/psu/psu_reports/CORSAIR_CMPSU-750HX_ECOS%201463_750W_Report.pdf
  10. Luci3nd4r said:
    I have a question that is not related to this. But how do I put the hyperlink with the component names instead of using website address but it goes through that website for the component.


    Basically: [_url=http://www.websiteaddresshere.com]The text you want to display[_/url]

    Just remove the _ that I placed after both of the starting brackets; i.e. replace the two [_ with just [
  11. I appreciate for the help guys. I'm going to get the Corsair AX750.
    Thanks ekoostik for helping the hyperlink.
  12. Few minutes ago, I check at Newegg they now have Asus GTX 460 TOP 1GB. I will be playing SC2, Bad Company 2, Crysis and many others on my wish list. I think this video card would be better to do Folding@Home what you guys think I should go for. Yes, I'm going to SLI.

    Asus GTX 460 DirectCU TOP 1GB $244.99

    Sapphire 5870 $369.99
  13. Well, the 5870 and the 460 are different tiers of cards. The more comparable card to the 5870 from nvidia is the 470. It's pretty easy to say that

    Crossfire 5870 >> SLI 460 >> 5870 >> 460.

    Since the 460 has awesome scaling, sli 460's are the best bang for your buck, but it really depends what kind of performance you really want. See the graph below to see exactly what I mean.

    http://techreport.com/articles.x/19404/11
  14. Tom's just did a review of 460's. You can find the whole article, and specifically the Asus GTX 460 TOP here: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-460-roundup-gf104,2714-2.html

    The 5870 beats the 460. But you pay for that difference. Neo is right, the 470 is a more direct comparison.

    Check out some of the performance numbers in the games you care about and decide how much the difference is worth to you. The numbers for single cards are pretty easy to find. For example, at Tom's: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-460-gf104-fermi,2684-8.html

    For single and CF/SLI setups, check out this AT article: http://www.anandtech.com/show/3809/nvidias-geforce-gtx-460-the-200-king/6
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