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Max Memory Sandy Bridge

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November 24, 2010 3:04:30 AM

What is the max amount of Memory that Sandy Bridge supports? I am considering a 970 with a six slot motherboard giving me max 24GB of support down the road. I know 8GB dimms are on the way and I'm wondering if we will get 16GB or 32GB memory support on SB.
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a b } Memory
November 24, 2010 3:11:46 AM

Im not sure if the CPU has a built in restriction, its mostly a restriction imposed by the capabilities of the motherboards. Once 8GB DDR3 sticks become available boards will likely upgrade pretty quickly to 48GB for triple channel and 32GB for dual channel boards, with just a BIOS update.

AFAIK sandy bridge is only dual channel so it will likely only have up to 16GB of memory, but most applications that require massive quantities of memory tend to be run on dual processor work stations which can support up to 48GB of memory through 12 memory slots currently.
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November 24, 2010 3:17:34 AM

From what I can tell it's restricted by the on proc. memory controller or firmware. Intel states "24GB" support for 970's but would love to see this updated.

I do understand that large workloads run on mult-proc machines but I would like a single proc with a few virtual machines doing what I need and would like them to have a hand chuck available. I assume the workloads to continue to grow as they did in the past.
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November 24, 2010 3:40:48 AM

Hi mstang1988, 5.0? :)  Welcome to THW.

I have found this in an article published a few days ago, refering to SandyBridge:

"based on Intel H67 chipset, and supports Core i3 / i5 / i7 microprocessors with TDP up to 95 Watt. There will be four memory slots, and is probably designed for DDR3-1066 and DDR3-1333 with the maximum amount of supported memory being 16 GB. "

Read more: http://www.techeye.net/hardware/biostar-shows-off-sandy...
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November 24, 2010 3:45:05 AM

thechief73 said:
Hi mstang1988, 5.0? :)  Welcome to THW.

I have found this in an article published a few days ago, refering to SandyBridge:

"based on Intel H67 chipset, and supports Core i3 / i5 / i7 microprocessors with TDP up to 95 Watt. There will be four memory slots, and is probably designed for DDR3-1066 and DDR3-1333 with the maximum amount of supported memory being 16 GB. "

Read more: http://www.techeye.net/hardware/biostar-shows-off-sandy...


Thanks! I had a 5.0, now a 03 Termi... Mmmm, boost is fun

Thanks for the quote! I think the i7 970 is going to be the deal for me.
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November 24, 2010 4:13:02 AM

Dual channel seems to be for the LGA1155 only. The later LGA2011 will have quad channel with up to 8 RAM slots. :) 
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November 24, 2010 4:19:36 AM

halfcalf said:
Dual channel seems to be for the LGA1155 only. The later LGA2011 will have quad channel with up to 8 RAM slots. :) 

Yes but 2011 is at least 3Q and we don't know if it will be 8 slots or just 4 with 4 channel support. Would love to see it though! :-)
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November 24, 2010 5:19:45 AM

^You make a very good point there mstang1988, since 2011 wil be quad channel and most people will want to run their memory that way, will the motherboard manufactures only make 4 memory slots available restricting easy upgrades or will they go for 8 slots, which sounds like ALOT but will also let users upgrade as they have been with dual and tripple channel.

I for one cannot wait to see what they chose to do with this one. :) 
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November 24, 2010 1:52:04 PM

thechief73 said:
^You make a very good point there mstang1988, since 2011 wil be quad channel and most people will want to run their memory that way, will the motherboard manufactures only make 4 memory slots available restricting easy upgrades or will they go for 8 slots, which sounds like ALOT but will also let users upgrade as they have been with dual and tripple channel.

I for one cannot wait to see what they chose to do with this one. :) 


I now know what I want for Xmas! 8 RAM SLOTS! Oh... I can only dream... :lol: 
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November 24, 2010 4:50:48 PM

halfcalf said:
I now know what I want for Xmas! 8 RAM SLOTS! Oh... I can only dream... :lol: 
LMAO! [:badge:5] You already have a cow that can use a computer, what more can you ask for? :D 
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November 24, 2010 5:11:22 PM

Yeah, but my cow is an LGA1155 dual channel cow. I want the LGA2011 quad channel so I can have EIGHT TEATS! :bounce: 
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January 3, 2011 10:24:39 PM

hunter315 said:
Once 8GB DDR3 sticks become available boards will likely upgrade pretty quickly to 48GB for triple channel and 32GB for dual channel boards, with just a BIOS update.

The memory controller is now on the processor itself, so the question is: Will Sandy Bridge support 8GB DDR3 sticks?

hunter315 said:
AFAIK sandy bridge is only dual channel so it will likely only have up to 16GB of memory, but most applications that require massive quantities of memory tend to be run on dual processor work stations which can support up to 48GB of memory through 12 memory slots currently.

Dual processor work stations are very expensive. By contrast, you can buy 24GB of DDR3 for $329 at the egg.

Premiere CS5 with CUDA enabled will use all the memory you throw at it. Many users are going with the full 24GB. So if Sandy Bridge is limited to 16GB of RAM, then the triple channel Core-i7 may end up being faster in Premiere CS5 just because it supports more memory.
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January 4, 2011 1:10:51 AM

Quote:
Hahahahahahaha I lauf at you all. Amd have a 256tb memory limit So intel must be there and about or higher.

I'm sure the DRAM controller on the CPU chip has practical limitations.

Quote:
But that's not why I'm laufin this is why

Here are the upper RAM limits for the different editions of Windows 7:
*.Starter: 8GB
*.Home Basic: 8GB
*.Home Premium: 16GB
*.Professional: 192GB
*.Enterprise: 192GB
*.Ultimate: 192GB

This is a good point, and the reason why CS5 forums recommend Win7 Pro.
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January 4, 2011 3:42:24 PM

What I don't understand, is why would they support 4x1333mhz ddr3 instead of 3x1866mhz or 1600mhz for that matter. And why not support 1600 instead of 'just' 1333 for SB?

Also, for Sandy Bridge i5 2500k, is there any benefit going from 1333 ddr3 to 1600? In which situation, and is it relevant?
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January 4, 2011 6:32:00 PM

The saddest part is you don't need that much RAM, even on a 64-bit system. All 32-bit apps (99.9% of games and programs we use) are still bound by the 2GB Address Space limit, even when the OS is X64. So unless you plan to open up 6 instances of Crysis, or have a TON of background tasks that eat up RAM, you won't be using the majority of that RAM. Hence why you don't see significant improvements in benchmarks beyond 6GB...
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a b } Memory
January 4, 2011 9:11:00 PM

gamerk316 said:
The saddest part is you don't need that much RAM, even on a 64-bit system. All 32-bit apps (99.9% of games and programs we use) are still bound by the 2GB Address Space limit, even when the OS is X64. So unless you plan to open up 6 instances of Crysis, or have a TON of background tasks that eat up RAM, you won't be using the majority of that RAM. Hence why you don't see significant improvements in benchmarks beyond 6GB...


No, 32 bit programs can use up to 4GB in a 64 bit OS. I've tried it. Also, there are genuine uses for that much RAM (I know I would love to have more, but 4GB DIMMs are too expensive to justify right now).
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