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Intel doesnt bring Core Locking Trouble !

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Anonymous
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November 25, 2010 8:40:12 AM

Hi guys i heard that AMD Cpus Lock 2 Cores if ur CPU is Quad Core ! but Intel doesnt do such thing , so i wanted to know is it always better to Get INTEL to 4Cores get used ? Because Sometimes cores never get unlocked so we will be limited forever with AMD CPU .


What do u think !

More about : intel doesnt bring core locking trouble

November 25, 2010 10:19:46 AM

uh, thats the most ridiculous thing ive heard in quite some time. Intel's high end CPU's hold the performance crown, but you certainly pay for it. bottom line: if you buy an AMD quad core, you get 4 properly functioning cores. theres no way AMD could stay afloat otherwise.
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November 25, 2010 10:48:46 AM

Quote:
Hi guys i heard that AMD Cpus Lock 2 Cores if ur CPU is Quad Core ! but Intel doesnt do such thing , so i wanted to know is it always better to Get INTEL to 4Cores get used ? Because Sometimes cores never get unlocked so we will be limited forever with AMD CPU .


What do u think !


Both manufacturers sell some CPUs that have more cores in the physical silicon than are turned on and active. They've been doing so ever since there were dies with more than one core aboard. However, the manufacturer always sells the CPU as being a lower-core model, such as AMD selling the Phenom II X2 as a dual-core unit despite the physical die having four cores. So you're only buying and paying for a dual-core, not a quad-core. Usually the disabled cores were permanently disabled and there was no way to turn them back on, but only AMD has allowed people very recently to try to turn them back on, so the issue of "locked cores" has gotten much more popular than it was previously. The processor being run as sold with the disabled cores remaining off has passed all of the reliability and functionality tests on the remaining cores and will be equal to a processor whose die never had any of the extra, disabled cores aboard. The fact that many of the current server-class CPUs have cores disabled means that the vendors absolutely feel that the units run just fine with some cores disabled.

If you still want to avoid buying a CPU with disabled cores, then you want to avoid the following Intel chips as well:

- Core Solo (dual-core with one core shut off)
- Celeron 400 and later series single-cores (dual-core with one core shut off)
- Dual-core Xeon E5500 series units (quad-core with two cores shut off)
- All of the quad-core Xeon 5600 series units (six-core with two cores shut off)
- Quad-core Xeon 7400 series units (six-core with two cores shut off)
- Quad-core and six-core Xeon 6500 series units (eight-core with two or four cores shut off)
- Quad-core and six-core Xeon 7500 series units (eight-core with two or four cores shut off)
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Anonymous
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November 25, 2010 12:55:20 PM

OK so Simple no need to Bring Long Parghraps just say yes or No & sure !

Answer these Questions with Yes or No ( true False )

1.If i get i5 760 all cores are Unlocked for 100% ! no need to unlock them & they will Perform 100% will with 4 Cores !
2.if i get amd cpu i should unlock cores but if i get Intel i wont !
3.Core Lock take 2 Cores no matter if ur Cpu is 6 cores or 4Cores !
4.it only happens in AMD Six Cores !
5.it happens in INTEL too !
5.Unlocking 100% deepends on the Mobo that we get !
7.will Phenom 965 BE , BE Locked from begining & i should unlock it ?
8.it happens from first or in some Cases ?
9.In fact 2 cores of INTEL & AMD CPUS are Locked & only AMD can Unlock it & intel doesnt have that Ability ?


Remember only YES or no , if u want add something just add a Short Words .
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November 25, 2010 1:29:34 PM

MU_Engineer said:
Both manufacturers sell some CPUs that have more cores in the physical silicon than are turned on and active. They've been doing so ever since there were dies with more than one core aboard. However, the manufacturer always sells the CPU as being a lower-core model, such as AMD selling the Phenom II X2 as a dual-core unit despite the physical die having four cores. So you're only buying and paying for a dual-core, not a quad-core. Usually the disabled cores were permanently disabled and there was no way to turn them back on, but only AMD has allowed people very recently to try to turn them back on, so the issue of "locked cores" has gotten much more popular than it was previously. The processor being run as sold with the disabled cores remaining off has passed all of the reliability and functionality tests on the remaining cores and will be equal to a processor whose die never had any of the extra, disabled cores aboard. The fact that many of the current server-class CPUs have cores disabled means that the vendors absolutely feel that the units run just fine with some cores disabled.

If you still want to avoid buying a CPU with disabled cores, then you want to avoid the following Intel chips as well:

- Core Solo (dual-core with one core shut off)
- Celeron 400 and later series single-cores (dual-core with one core shut off)
- Dual-core Xeon E5500 series units (quad-core with two cores shut off)
- All of the quad-core Xeon 5600 series units (six-core with two cores shut off)
- Quad-core Xeon 7400 series units (six-core with two cores shut off)
- Quad-core and six-core Xeon 6500 series units (eight-core with two or four cores shut off)
- Quad-core and six-core Xeon 7500 series units (eight-core with two or four cores shut off)


+1

Quote:
OK so Simple no need to Bring Long Parghraps just say yes or No & sure !

Answer these Questions with Yes or No ( true False )

1.If i get i5 760 all cores are Unlocked for 100% ! no need to unlock them & they will Perform 100% will with 4 Cores !
2.if i get amd cpu i should unlock cores but if i get Intel i wont !
3.Core Lock take 2 Cores no matter if ur Cpu is 6 cores or 4Cores !
4.it only happens in AMD Six Cores !
5.it happens in INTEL too !
5.Unlocking 100% deepends on the Mobo that we get !
7.will Phenom 965 BE , BE Locked from begining & i should unlock it ?
8.it happens from first or in some Cases ?
9.In fact 2 cores of INTEL & AMD CPUS are Locked & only AMD can Unlock it & intel doesnt have that Ability ?


Remember only YES or no , if u want add something just add a Short Words .


1. Yes, the only thing that the Core i5 is a core i7 (quad core) with HT turn off.

2. Err... yes... Thats if you get an AMD cpu that has useable cores and/or has locked cores.

3. No, There are people with Phenom II x2 that unlock to the 3 cores cpu that didn't take it to 4 cores because the 4th core is not functional.

4. no. There are only few cpus that are 6 cores with 4 cores (the phenom II x 4 960T for example). All of them last i checked, are either not out or were given to OEM's (like dell or HP).

5. yes and no. Yes intel has disabled cores (as MU pointed out) and no as no motherboard maker has attempted to unlock these cpu's. (most desktop cpu's from intel have there are native core count. So it's not a well targeted market for unlocking cpu's.)

6. Acctually it's more or less 25% motherboard and 75% CPU. Most motherboard makers have gotten the "unlocking core" stuff down like art. It's more or less the cpu you have to worry about if it unlocks or not.

7. 965 BE is a full quad core that cant be unlocked further. In fact there nothing to unlock as it even has an unlocked multi for overclocking purposes .

8. can you rephase that question? I dont seam to understand what you're trying to ask.

9. Correct, only AMD motherboard have the ablitity to unlock cpu's while intel doesn't.


Sorry if some of these go beyond the "just add a Short Words" but sometime a few words dont mean anything unless you write a sentence or two.

Hope this helps.
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November 25, 2010 1:32:03 PM

Also Intel mobos don't bring Overclocking Trouble. Intel is awesome.
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Anonymous
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November 25, 2010 1:52:21 PM

Ok if i get Intel & 2 Cores out of 4 Cores Would be locked Then i WIll never have Chance to Unlock it But if i GET Phenom then i CAN ?

A Few more Questions :

1.Your Saying That Phenom 965 BE will never Lock any Cores ? never !?!?!
2.What about Intel i5 760 ? will i get One or more cores Locked ? or none of its core will be Locked ?
3.IF yes for Question 2 u say YES it will lock ! then What I can DO to Unlock it ? buying Good Mobo ?
4.I didnt know that Intel Lock Cores too ! just like AMD , is i5 & i7 Lock Cores too or Only Old models of Intel does ?
5.Which Models of Intel Lock the Cores ? & which one of them 100% dont Lock ?? please cheak if i5 760 is In Danger of Get Locked even if that Danger is 1% !
6.Please cheak Phenom 965 BE too !

Oh man i am so Crazy ! I Realy worry about Important Thing that will Effect on Every thing .

If i discover that Each of these CPUs will Lock the Cores then i will go for Other One !
i5 760 , phenom 965 BE
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Anonymous
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November 25, 2010 1:57:39 PM

No pro Bro , I liked what u wrote there , i mean Warmon 6 !
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Anonymous
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November 25, 2010 2:11:39 PM

1.So if i be A Person that wanna get A Quad Core CPU & dont want to have troubles Unlocking each cores , then i should go for i5 760 , shouldnt i ?
Point : i5 760 is SO Strong CPU No matter if it has HT or not ! i only worry about Core Lock & Unlocking trouble that ur saying that i5 760 WILL BE FULLY UNLOCKED at BIGENING , no ?

2.But if i get Phenom then i have to Unlock them Via Mobo , no way to see them Fully Unlocked, no ?

Just to make My self happy again & remove all DOUBTS :
3. i will get i5 760 all Cores Unlocked with no Unlocking Trouble & i will be Able to use Extra Speed of that CPU ( i will be able to use whole 4 Cores with no Limitations ) .

4.I think New Intel CPus are Solved ones whereas New AMD cpus have same Core Unlocking Problem ! so i think Intel is Winner in this Thign ! no ?

Please answer these & lets Close this Thread ! thanks a lot , sorry if i Talked so much & Wasted ur time ! so sorry Brtothers !
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Anonymous
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November 25, 2010 3:57:17 PM

Oh wait a Sec , thanks for the Answer but in some part u said that Phenom Cores get unlocked Via Mobo ( it means that the PHenom 965 BE that i plan to go may get Locked ) & in other part u said Intel i5 760 & Phenom 965 BE have nothing to get Locked ( it means that if i get them they will NEVER get Locked )

Ok Please say which u Said is Right ?
Or let me ask u More Simpler ( that u dont have to recheak ur Answer )

Listen Carefully , please YES or NO & words that u always add ( that make good sense )
. thanks a lot bro , till now u have helped me a lot just a little answers & Finsih !

1.WIll phenom II 4x 965 BE be 100% unlocked when i buy it or it Maybe ( in the Danger ) need an unlocker from Mobo .
2.you made Me Sure about i5 760 that will never BE Locked ( Mean :there is 0% chance to get locked ) is that Correct ? or i may See Locking Trouble on i5 760 too ?


Oh man come on help me out ! i realy dont wanna have that Trouble ! I may buy i5 or phenom , i can buy both , If i see that AMD will have that trouble then i will go for Intel that doesnt have , & if i see that both have that problem Then i will go for AMD that can be Fixable .
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Anonymous
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November 25, 2010 6:23:17 PM

oh sorry by sying Unlocked from begining i meant that they WILL not need any unlocking action . i think ( i guess ) u may got me wrong , u touhgt i told u that : ( i know they will be locked but will they get Unlocked ) where as i mean ( will they be unlocked before i install them on windows . Oh man sorry my second Question Brought to Things , u cant say yes or No , SO PLEASE LETS ASK MORE SIMPLER BY limiting u to say just one words or More .


1.How is the Condition when i Install Phenom 965 BE on my Mobo ?( simply : when i unbox it & Install it on Mobo )

A) Locked B)Fully Unlocked ( fixed Condition for Same Products ) C)locked with Chance of 100% unlock D) maybe Unlocked & Maybe not !

2.How ABOUT INTEL i5 760 ?

A) Same as Question 1 B) Same C) same D)

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Anonymous
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November 25, 2010 6:26:05 PM

Sorry , i get things too late & TOO hard ! but i am not that Stupid , Simple Answers usUally Doing better for Me ! I discovered that my Last Question Way will Finaly let me know how is COndition with this Big Trouble ! Please ANSWER my Last question , thanks a lot !
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Anonymous
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November 25, 2010 6:29:26 PM

Dipankar2007 , Honestly , are u Friend of me or ur Against me ? I dont try to HIDE ! & anyway why did u said those Things , by that ur saying that i realy like when i see u get Banned ?

Do u wanna Stop Friending with me ? if yes then Good bye , if no , u better help me instead of Get me in more Troubles . I realy need this site , i realy get every thing i want ! & i dont think that Others will stop me to Know What i want !
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
November 25, 2010 6:40:20 PM

Ok , if u Look Carefully to the Thread u will see that its fully New Thing , have i asked about Core Locking or Unlocking trouble Before ? see u think that my Questions are Endless ( its true ) but if u see better u will Understant that i want to Discover whole details about something , After that if i hadnt got baned I Would ask whole questions in one thread ! Oh man , i havnt tought that Friend ship Go to hell this soon ! OK its ur Call ! wanna stay a friend & do like a Friend or Not .


Butaway if u want help me Please answer my Question , 2 questions with A B C D options , its simple Questions , just mark answer by saying Question 2 : B ( for example )
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November 25, 2010 7:17:14 PM

I do know that amd has more defective core during wafer production process but i never heard of intel implementing this sort of system..
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Anonymous
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November 26, 2010 6:36:40 AM

Thanks a Lot bro ! Now my mind is clean of any doubts ! now i am free to choose between them , . We have Fixed things like when we have 32 bit windows then we can only use maximum 3.5 Ram & if we have 64Bit then we can use how ever we want , ITS FIXED THING ( means : u cant find person who has ran 8GB of ram on 32Bit )

I fully Accept u , i wish the things that u say would be a FIXED thing not a thing that Usually happens ! I wish i be SO Lucky & get Whole Cores Unlocked as u said !

It seem i choosed Very good Options of Both AMD & Intel !
Thanks a Lot brothers !
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2010 6:40:32 AM

Wait a sec , i saw this in Other THREAD ! i Copy , Paste its words to here , take a look :
(( The Phenom II x4 965BE has only four cores at most. Thuban four cores, a product not yet on the market, will have two cores disabled and could potentially be unlocked, given the right mainboard and firmware)). ( from Houndsteeth's Thread )

As u can see they are not Unlocked from First ! now Please tell me , whats going on ?
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November 26, 2010 7:14:54 AM

I dont know why you are so worried about this???
If you buy an x4 it means you get 4 cores, if you buy an x3 it means you get 3 cores with the POSSIBILITY of unlocking the 4th.
It DOESNT mean that AMD will sell you and x4 and only give you 2 cores that are operational and make you unlock the other 2.
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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
November 26, 2010 8:53:31 AM

So if it is like what ur saying , so why many have Unlocking 4rth core Issue ? specialy with AMD Cpus ? i know i will get 4 Cores but , i already know that i may get 2 cores locked , i want to get CPu that i wont have Unlocking trouble ( will get 4 cores ready from First ) . i found i5 760 that is pure Quad core , now i wanna have AMD Option too ( that be Pure Quad Core , not a Locked Cores )


SImply : i dont wanna have to Unlock a Cores , if cores get locked I will use REAL Dual Core . Oh irealy worry about Phenom 965 BE Cores . i wish i can get IT CORES FULLY UNLOCKED ! will i ?

Correct this .

1.Isnt i5 760 Pure Unlocked Quad Core , which has 4 Stable , unlocked & ready Cores ?
( this is what many says , so i just expect YES )

2.I already heard that AMD Cpus have Unlocking Trouble , i wanna know if Phenom 965 BE , goes to AMD CPus List that need to Be unlocked .

SO SIMPLE : is there Core Locking POSSIBILITY for Phenom965 BE ? even 1% ? or its Fixed thing that none of the Phenom 965 BE s get Locked ( are Unlocked )

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Anonymous
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November 26, 2010 8:57:47 AM

Please say Fixed thing , if yes , then u should know that the YES that u say is for ALL same Prodcut .

For example : if u say yes , phenom 965 BE is Unlocked from first & u realy dont have to Unlock it via mobo . then your saying this for all Phenom 965 BE .
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November 26, 2010 10:14:22 AM

All the 4 cores work on the Phenom II X4 965 BE.All of them period.

If one core was not up to specifications when manufactured it could not be a X4 processor (It would end up binned as an X3 (triple core).
If two cores of the four were not up to specifications when manufactured it would end up as a X2 (or dual core CPU).
The manufacturer of the CPU tests these and if not up to par or testing standards
they disable 1 or more CPU cores.

On a triple core Phenom II (Phenom II X3) one core is disabled as it is not up to tested specs when manufactured.A user can possibly enable the disabled (not up to spec) core and it might still work.

On a dual core Phenom II (Phenom II X2) two cores are disabled as another 2 cores are not up to tested specifications when manufactured.
A user might possibly enable one or both of the disabled cores.

Enabling a disabled core is not recommended by AMD however if it works the user would be getting a CPU with more performance for less cost (that's the only motive for users doing this)

Thuban is AMD's 6 core version of the Phenom II (or Phenom II X6).
It has 6 working cores and has been available for quite some time now.
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Anonymous
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November 26, 2010 10:33:36 AM

SO , it stills risky , to buy Phenom 965 BE because . they may Lock 1 or More cores as they Test it ! I think i better get i5 760 , i am sure Producers will never lock i5 760 Cores ! Maybe i am wrong about i5 760 . you correct me !

ANyway is it Worth to buy Phenom 965 BE . i guess you understood that i realy dont want have any unlocking problem even one !So suggest me , is it worth to Buy Phenom 965BE ? i 100% get Unlocked cores . or there have been persons that had Issue with this CPU ??
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November 26, 2010 10:48:35 AM

Yes its worth it to buy a Phenom II X4 965 BE.The i5 760 is also a great CPU too (more powerful than the Phenom II X4 965 BE but more expensive as well).

No cores are locked at all on the Phenom II X4 965 BE CPU.
No bad issues have been discovered about it.


However a user could disable a CPU core in BIOS if they did not know what they were doing.On starting a new custom computer built system or a OEM name brand one the default BIOS settings would not disable a core.A user again not knowing what they were doing could enter BIOS and tamper with the settings to disable one or more cores.That's why some PC owners set up a password so only they normally can enter BIOS to change the settings.
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November 26, 2010 10:55:51 AM

Quote:
SO , it stills risky , to buy Phenom 965 BE because . they may Lock 1 or More cores as they Test it ! I think i better get i5 760 , i am sure Producers will never lock i5 760 Cores ! Maybe i am wrong about i5 760 . you correct me !

ANyway is it Worth to buy Phenom 965 BE . i guess you understood that i realy dont want have any unlocking problem even one !So suggest me , is it worth to Buy Phenom 965BE ? i 100% get Unlocked cores . or there have been persons that had Issue with this CPU ??


I am going to type this very slowly, so read carefully... Phenom II X4 965 = 4 cores. END. OF. BLOODY. STORY.
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Anonymous
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November 26, 2010 11:03:02 AM

oh ok , but what aout that person . it maybe its mobo issue , so please tell me which of these mobo wont lock up the Cores ?
1.ASUS Crosshair IV Formula - 890FX
2.amd 890 fx

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Anonymous
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November 26, 2010 12:39:42 PM

Quote:
................................
http://www.esreality.com/files/inlineimages/2010/78195-triple%20face%20palm.jpg

If it has core unlock feature, it'll have core locking feature, it's just if u want to lock it up.......................

All 890fx are the same from a chipset perspective................



Why some one Should Lock its Cores ? who realy like limitations ? :heink: 
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November 26, 2010 12:46:01 PM

Quote:
Please say Fixed thing , if yes , then u should know that the YES that u say is for ALL same Prodcut .

For example : if u say yes , phenom 965 BE is Unlocked from first & u realy dont have to Unlock it via mobo . then your saying this for all Phenom 965 BE .


Let me explain this for you. CPU manufacturers want to be able to sell a range of different CPUs with different clock speeds and different numbers of cores. However, it's awfully expensive to make a unique silicon die for each and every model line, plus you would need to have a separate manufacturing line to make each die as well. It also makes the company much less responsive to changes in consumer demand- for example, if consumers want more 3-core CPUs and fewer 2- and 4-core ones. So makers will have a few silicon dies they will selectively disable parts on such that they can sell the different parts they want to without having a big expense of separate dies and manufacturing lines for each product line. This lets them quickly adjust what parts they have to sell and doesn't mess with their production lines as much as having separate silicon dies for every product line.

There are three main reasons why a company will disable cores or other features present in the silicon die:

1. Thermal output of the CPU. The maximum performance of modern CPUs are limited in performance by their thermal output, since dissipating heat and providing power to a CPU that consumes more than 125-140 watts is something that most office users and manufacturers don't want to deal with. Fewer cores = less heat at the same clock speeds, so if you want a higher-clocked CPU, you're going to have to reduce the core count to keep the CPU's heat production in check. This is the main reason why AMD shuts off cores in most of their CPUs and why you don't see as high of clock speeds on Phenom II X6s as you do on X4s, for example. Shutting off cores to save on heat production generally means that the cores that are shut off are completely functional. This is why people can generally "unlock" a dual-core or triple-core Phenom II or a triple-core Athlon II to a quad-core unit- they're just turning on the turned-off cores. You just have to deal with greater-than-stock electrical demands and thermal output, which is no problem to an enthusiast or overclocker with a suitable motherboard and cooling. But for your average big-box computer maker, being able to have a guarantee on how much heat the CPU throws off for a certain combination of clock speed and core count means they can better fine-tune the power supply, motherboard, and cooling requirements of their units.

2. Marketing reasons. If manufacturers feel that they can charge a premium for certain features, they will disable them in low-end CPUs. This lets them "persuade" buyers to spend more on a CPU with the desired features but also allow the manufacturer to sell CPUs at a low price point as well. Intel is particularly notorious for this as they routinely disable features like HyperThreading, Turbo Boost, ECC memory support, and hardware virtualization on lower-end CPUs to persuade people to spend more on higher-end CPUs. AMD occasionally does this as well, mainly in disabling some of the SIMD hardware on lower-end Athlon II notebook CPUs (the whole "64-bit FPU vs. 128 bit FPU" bit.)

3. To allow the company to sell what would otherwise have been a defective die. Every semiconductor fabricator has some defects in some of their parts; that's just how the manufacturing process works. If you have a quad-core die and only sell quad-core parts, then any defects that result in a core not working properly result in that die needing to be thrown out. If you also sell triple-core parts made using that die, you can just shut off the defective die and end up with a perfectly-functional, salable triple-core product. Trying to unlock a chip that had a core disabled for this reason will not work, and this is why not all dual-core or triple-core Phenom IIs or triple-core Athlon IIs will successfully unlock to quad-core parts. However, they are perfectly fine as the dual-core or triple-core parts they were sold as. Intel doesn't sell that many units with disabled cores to home users as most are Celerons and Xeons, but they do sell CPUs with some cache disabled due to defects. That was very apparent with the Core 2 generation of CPUs, since most of the die was cache on the high-end parts and thus the most likely part to be defective. You had parts with 6 MB, 4 MB, 3 MB, and 2 MB cache sizes on 45 nm, despite there only being 6 MB and 3 MB dies.

jj463rd said:
All the 4 cores work on the Phenom II X4 965 BE.All of them period.

If one core was not up to specifications when manufactured it could not be a X4 processor (It would end up binned as an X3 (triple core).
If two cores of the four were not up to specifications when manufactured it would end up as a X2 (or dual core CPU).
The manufacturer of the CPU tests these and if not up to par or testing standards
they disable 1 or more CPU cores.

On a triple core Phenom II (Phenom II X3) one core is disabled as it is not up to tested specs when manufactured.A user can possibly enable the disabled (not up to spec) core and it might still work.

On a dual core Phenom II (Phenom II X2) two cores are disabled as another 2 cores are not up to tested specifications when manufactured.
A user might possibly enable one or both of the disabled cores.

Enabling a disabled core is not recommended by AMD however if it works the user would be getting a CPU with more performance for less cost (that's the only motive for users doing this)


The reasons AMD would disable a core are outlined above. I'd be very willing to bet that most of the units with disabled cores have them disabled because of either market demand* or because the CPU ran fine as a quad-core but overshot the thermal specs. Both will result in a CPU with four perfectly functional cores. The former CPU will run exactly as a proper X4, but the latter will run hotter.

*If AMD (and Intel) wants to preserve the higher selling prices of their higher-end CPUs, they will sometimes decide to intentionally turn off parts of perfectly-functional higher-end parts to create lower-end parts if they have a lot of demand for lower-end parts. This is a marketing/COO decision to make, not an engineering one.

Quote:
SO , it stills risky , to buy Phenom 965 BE because . they may Lock 1 or More cores as they Test it ! I think i better get i5 760 , i am sure Producers will never lock i5 760 Cores ! Maybe i am wrong about i5 760 . you correct me !


The Phenom II X4 965 BE is not locked. You will always have all of the cores you paid for running properly, unless you go into the motherboard's BIOS and tell it to ignore some of the cores. In that case, all you have to do to get the cores turned on again is to change that BIOS setting to see all of the cores and you will be 100% guaranteed that the cores will all turn on and run properly.

The i5 760 is actually a partially-locked CPU. The Lynnfield die has the ability to do HyperThreading but Intel intentionally disabled it to persuade people to buy one of the more-expensive i7 800-series CPUs instead of the i5 760 if they want HyperThreading. You will never be able to turn HyperThreading on in the i5 760.

Quote:
ANyway is it Worth to buy Phenom 965 BE . i guess you understood that i realy dont want have any unlocking problem even one !So suggest me , is it worth to Buy Phenom 965BE ? i 100% get Unlocked cores . or there have been persons that had Issue with this CPU ??

If you don't want to have to do any unlocking of a CPU to be assured you're getting a quad-core CPU, go buy a quad-core CPU. The Phenom II X4 965BE fits that bill perfectly, as does the entire Athlon II X4 and Phenom II X4 line. As for whether to get the 965BE over any other Phenom II X4, that depends on what you're going to be doing with it. The Best Gaming CPUs for the Money guide is a good place to start.
[/quotemsg]
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November 26, 2010 1:19:39 PM

OP will not understand what or who the OP is.
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Anonymous
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November 26, 2010 1:59:26 PM

Op=ME & after that , jj463rd & Dipankar2007 , you make no sense so please dont answer any more if you cant answer right thing . MU_Engineer thanks a lot ! you wasted your time For me . i will select you as a best answer .

Now i am 100% sure that i will get 4 Cores from 965 BE

about i5 760 : i dont need Hyper Threading since it is Very Great CPU ! but you mentioned something :The i5 760 is actually a partially-locked CPU

It means that it Only Limited from Hyperthreading or you meant that it has Locked Cores ( limited from Cores )?


Answer this & i will select you as a BEST ANSWER . you made almost 98 % of things CLEAR for me !
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Anonymous
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November 26, 2010 2:34:06 PM

Please anser this , its too Important . & lets Close this thread oK ?

about i5 760 : i dont need Hyper Threading since it is Very Great CPU ! but you mentioned something :The i5 760 is actually a partially-locked CPU

It means that it Only Limited from Hyperthreading or you meant that it has Locked Cores ( limited from Cores
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a b à CPUs
November 26, 2010 2:51:27 PM

MU_Engineer said:
Let me explain this for you. CPU manufacturers want to be able to sell a range of different CPUs with different clock speeds and different numbers of cores. However, it's awfully expensive to make a unique silicon die for each and every model line, plus you would need to have a separate manufacturing line to make each die as well. It also makes the company much less responsive to changes in consumer demand- for example, if consumers want more 3-core CPUs and fewer 2- and 4-core ones. So makers will have a few silicon dies they will selectively disable parts on such that they can sell the different parts they want to without having a big expense of separate dies and manufacturing lines for each product line. This lets them quickly adjust what parts they have to sell and doesn't mess with their production lines as much as having separate silicon dies for every product line.

There are three main reasons why a company will disable cores or other features present in the silicon die:

1. Thermal output of the CPU. The maximum performance of modern CPUs are limited in performance by their thermal output, since dissipating heat and providing power to a CPU that consumes more than 125-140 watts is something that most office users and manufacturers don't want to deal with. Fewer cores = less heat at the same clock speeds, so if you want a higher-clocked CPU, you're going to have to reduce the core count to keep the CPU's heat production in check. This is the main reason why AMD shuts off cores in most of their CPUs and why you don't see as high of clock speeds on Phenom II X6s as you do on X4s, for example. Shutting off cores to save on heat production generally means that the cores that are shut off are completely functional. This is why people can generally "unlock" a dual-core or triple-core Phenom II or a triple-core Athlon II to a quad-core unit- they're just turning on the turned-off cores. You just have to deal with greater-than-stock electrical demands and thermal output, which is no problem to an enthusiast or overclocker with a suitable motherboard and cooling. But for your average big-box computer maker, being able to have a guarantee on how much heat the CPU throws off for a certain combination of clock speed and core count means they can better fine-tune the power supply, motherboard, and cooling requirements of their units.

2. Marketing reasons. If manufacturers feel that they can charge a premium for certain features, they will disable them in low-end CPUs. This lets them "persuade" buyers to spend more on a CPU with the desired features but also allow the manufacturer to sell CPUs at a low price point as well. Intel is particularly notorious for this as they routinely disable features like HyperThreading, Turbo Boost, ECC memory support, and hardware virtualization on lower-end CPUs to persuade people to spend more on higher-end CPUs. AMD occasionally does this as well, mainly in disabling some of the SIMD hardware on lower-end Athlon II notebook CPUs (the whole "64-bit FPU vs. 128 bit FPU" bit.)

3. To allow the company to sell what would otherwise have been a defective die. Every semiconductor fabricator has some defects in some of their parts; that's just how the manufacturing process works. If you have a quad-core die and only sell quad-core parts, then any defects that result in a core not working properly result in that die needing to be thrown out. If you also sell triple-core parts made using that die, you can just shut off the defective die and end up with a perfectly-functional, salable triple-core product. Trying to unlock a chip that had a core disabled for this reason will not work, and this is why not all dual-core or triple-core Phenom IIs or triple-core Athlon IIs will successfully unlock to quad-core parts. However, they are perfectly fine as the dual-core or triple-core parts they were sold as. Intel doesn't sell that many units with disabled cores to home users as most are Celerons and Xeons, but they do sell CPUs with some cache disabled due to defects. That was very apparent with the Core 2 generation of CPUs, since most of the die was cache on the high-end parts and thus the most likely part to be defective. You had parts with 6 MB, 4 MB, 3 MB, and 2 MB cache sizes on 45 nm, despite there only being 6 MB and 3 MB dies.



The reasons AMD would disable a core are outlined above. I'd be very willing to bet that most of the units with disabled cores have them disabled because of either market demand* or because the CPU ran fine as a quad-core but overshot the thermal specs. Both will result in a CPU with four perfectly functional cores. The former CPU will run exactly as a proper X4, but the latter will run hotter.

*If AMD (and Intel) wants to preserve the higher selling prices of their higher-end CPUs, they will sometimes decide to intentionally turn off parts of perfectly-functional higher-end parts to create lower-end parts if they have a lot of demand for lower-end parts. This is a marketing/COO decision to make, not an engineering one.



The Phenom II X4 965 BE is not locked. You will always have all of the cores you paid for running properly, unless you go into the motherboard's BIOS and tell it to ignore some of the cores. In that case, all you have to do to get the cores turned on again is to change that BIOS setting to see all of the cores and you will be 100% guaranteed that the cores will all turn on and run properly.

The i5 760 is actually a partially-locked CPU. The Lynnfield die has the ability to do HyperThreading but Intel intentionally disabled it to persuade people to buy one of the more-expensive i7 800-series CPUs instead of the i5 760 if they want HyperThreading. You will never be able to turn HyperThreading on in the i5 760.

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ANyway is it Worth to buy Phenom 965 BE . i guess you understood that i realy dont want have any unlocking problem even one !So suggest me , is it worth to Buy Phenom 965BE ? i 100% get Unlocked cores . or there have been persons that had Issue with this CPU ??
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If you don't want to have to do any unlocking of a CPU to be assured you're getting a quad-core CPU, go buy a quad-core CPU. The Phenom II X4 965BE fits that bill perfectly, as does the entire Athlon II X4 and Phenom II X4 line. As for whether to get the 965BE over any other Phenom II X4, that depends on what you're going to be doing with it. The Best Gaming CPUs for the Money guide is a good place to start.


I would pay you to be my teacher :) 
Your post made this hellish thread worth reading!
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a c 102 à CPUs
November 26, 2010 3:22:10 PM

Quote:
Please anser this , its too Important . & lets Close this thread oK ?

about i5 760 : i dont need Hyper Threading since it is Very Great CPU ! but you mentioned something :The i5 760 is actually a partially-locked CPU

It means that it Only Limited from Hyperthreading or you meant that it has Locked Cores ( limited from Cores


It is only limited from using HyperThreading. There are no disabled cores on the i5 760.
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