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How to format SSD into a separate partition?

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December 11, 2012 7:13:54 PM

Please excuse my ignorance but I'm still relatively new to the world of using multiple HD's.

I just recently purchased a SSD and moved everything from my first HD to it, alas its almost full so I just purchased a second to help share the load and I was wondering how I'd go about installing it and formatting it to a separate partition, same with my first HD seeing as I'd rather not waste it, it could be used to hold all my videos and pictures.

Oh and I'm using Windows 7 x64 bit.

Again my apologies for bringing up an issue that's probably easily fixed.

Also someone mentioned something about RAID? Not sure what that is truth be told.

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a c 353 G Storage
December 11, 2012 8:35:31 PM

When it comes to set-up partitions on an SSD it is No differet than a HDD.
You say your first one is almost full, you do know that you must leave some of the drive free. Initially it was stated that 10-> 15 % of the drive should be left free. Latest I've seen now recommends that 20->25% of an SSD used be left free.
Ref: http://www.anandtech.com/show/6489/playing-with-op

Not sure3 what you are doing, nor what sizes of SSD you are working with.
You can set the partition size during windows 7 installation. Just select custom install. On page showing HDD you can opt to set the size for the OS. The remainder of the disk you can either partition it, or wait until after Windows is installed and use windows disk manager to partition/format the remaining space.

For Your "Old" SSD just reformat it after windows is installed on New SSD - Don't use multiple partitions on it.

Don't forget:
1) Verify Bios is set to AHCI before installing windows.
2) On have the One SSD connected for the windows install - disconnect ALL other SSDs and HDDs before installing windows on New SSD. If you don't, Boot info gets writen to the 2nd attached drive.

ADDED. Take a Pass on Raid. Raid0 is not worth it for SSDs, and Raid1 only protects against a single Disk failure, With SSD more than likely both will go out.
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December 11, 2012 8:44:28 PM

Hmmm, i'll be sure and make some room on my SSD then so that it's not near capacity.

I am working with two Samsung 840 Pro's 256gb. I don't intend to really move anything around seeing as I have my OS installed on the first 840. Im just looking to install this second SSD for additional storrage (ei: Photoshop, Video editing software and all my Steam games) and then possibly do the same with my older HD for videos and pictures.
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a c 353 G Storage
December 11, 2012 9:16:45 PM

That should be NO problem.
Both my desktops have two SSDs + HDDs, My laptop has two SSDs.
pre-SSD days I always used Two HDDs in Raid0 config, However with SSDs I really do not find much need for Raid0.
Typically Raid0 inproves primarily Sequencial performance which is not a biggy for an OS + Program drive inwhich access time and small 4 K random performance is what is important.
You could do a raid0 (Only recommend if you have an Intel 7 Series chipset), do a partition for the OS + Programs (no real performance gain here). then the second partition for your photo/video files where load times would benifit from the Higher sequensial performance. Is it really worth it, Not sure - I know I do not bother with it.
Reason the qualifier, I don't think AMD supports trim when an SSD is a member drive of a raid setup. Intel does, but currently only on their 7 series (ie Z77). There is a work-around for the 6 series MBs.
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December 11, 2012 9:19:21 PM

Best answer selected by Daratum.
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December 11, 2012 9:37:32 PM

RetiredChief said:
That should be NO problem.
Both my desktops have two SSDs + HDDs, My laptop has two SSDs.
pre-SSD days I always used Two HDDs in Raid0 config, However with SSDs I really do not find much need for Raid0.
Typically Raid0 inproves primarily Sequencial performance which is not a biggy for an OS + Program drive inwhich access time and small 4 K random performance is what is important.
You could do a raid0 (Only recommend if you have an Intel 7 Series chipset), do a partition for the OS + Programs (no real performance gain here). then the second partition for your photo/video files where load times would benifit from the Higher sequensial performance. Is it really worth it, Not sure - I know I do not bother with it.
Reason the qualifier, I don't think AMD supports trim when an SSD is a member drive of a raid setup. Intel does, but currently only on their 7 series (ie Z77). There is a work-around for the 6 series MBs.

How would I go about raid0 and what is it exactly? I have an i7 860 at the moment.


Id follow these directions, no?


1. Open Computer Management by clicking the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking System and Maintenance, clicking Administrative Tools, and then double-clicking Computer Management. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. In the Navigation pane, under Storage, click Disk Management.
3. Right-click an unallocated region on your hard disk, and then click New Simple Volume.
4. In the New Simple Volume Wizard, click Next.
5. Type the size of the volume you want to create in megabytes (MB) or accept the maximum default size, and then click Next.
6. Accept the default drive letter or choose a different drive letter to identify the partition, and then click Next.
7. In the Format Partition dialog box, do one of the following:
- If you don't want to format the volume right now, click Do not format this
volume, and then click Next.
- To format the volume with the default settings, click Next.
8. Review your choices, and then click Finish
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a c 353 G Storage
December 11, 2012 10:04:49 PM

Yes that is how you would partion/formate an unallocated space on a disk.

To create a raid0 volume. You connect the two drives and during the Post there is a hot key that you can press that takes you to the page for setting up a Raid array.
http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/08/raid-levels-tutoria...
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