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Anonymous
July 8, 2005 2:56:58 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

I log on with Administrator and no password. Is there a way to change the
username. I know I can add a password, which I will do when I get a better
name.
I created a different username/password combination but they don't have
any of the settings carefully created for "Administrator."

More about : logon

July 8, 2005 4:03:39 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

In news:o C6I4i2gFHA.4000@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
cmar <cma16@yahoo.com> had this to say:

My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

> I log on with Administrator and no password. Is there a way to change
> the username. I know I can add a password, which I will do when I get
> a better name.
> I created a different username/password combination but they don't
> have any of the settings carefully created for "Administrator."

Create another account, set it to run as admin (though I should warn you
that a limited account or power user is better security-wise) and then copy
your old admin profile over to the new one.

How to copy data from a corrupted user profile to a new profile:
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=811151

(Note that you're other user isn't really corrupted but the process is much
the same.)

You'll probably want this one too:

How to Take Ownership of a File or Folder in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308421

Galen
--

"But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
without them."

Sherlock Holmes
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 6:46:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

Hi Galen:
Thanks for the very useful reference. It appears that one has to have 3
users to do copy files to a new user profile.
Also, I was unclear what is the relevance of taking ownership of a
folder or file. Why would I want to do this?
Thanks, CMA


"Galen" <galennews@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:u9amII3gFHA.2072@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> In news:o C6I4i2gFHA.4000@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
> cmar <cma16@yahoo.com> had this to say:
>
> My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:
>
>> I log on with Administrator and no password. Is there a way to change
>> the username. I know I can add a password, which I will do when I get
>> a better name.
>> I created a different username/password combination but they don't
>> have any of the settings carefully created for "Administrator."
>
> Create another account, set it to run as admin (though I should warn you
> that a limited account or power user is better security-wise) and then
> copy your old admin profile over to the new one.
>
> How to copy data from a corrupted user profile to a new profile:
> http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=811151
>
> (Note that you're other user isn't really corrupted but the process is
> much the same.)
>
> You'll probably want this one too:
>
> How to Take Ownership of a File or Folder in Windows XP
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308421
>
> Galen
> --
>
> "But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
> without them."
>
> Sherlock Holmes
>
Related resources
July 8, 2005 9:22:11 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

In news:%23%23D8Q1%23gFHA.3544@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
cmar <cma16@yahoo.com> had this to say:

My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

> Hi Galen:
> Thanks for the very useful reference. It appears that one has to
> have 3 users to do copy files to a new user profile.
> Also, I was unclear what is the relevance of taking ownership of a
> folder or file. Why would I want to do this?
> Thanks, CMA

Because when you try to copy the other profile it might tell you that you
don't have permission to do so and so you'll need to take ownership of the
file(s) before you can move them. <g> I just wanted to save you the effort
of asking another question as it was the next logical problem you might
encounter.

Galen
--

"But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
without them."

Sherlock Holmes
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 10:21:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

This method worked quite well with a few exceptions. And since you know so
much, I will try you with these last few details.

In the new profile (to which I copied), Several icons have disappeared
from Desktop: My Computer; Network Neighborhood; My Documents.
Also, the Start Menu is no longer the Classic Start Menu. Can I get that
back.

Thanks,
CMA


"Galen" <galennews@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:o IjEdMAhFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> In news:%23%23D8Q1%23gFHA.3544@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
> cmar <cma16@yahoo.com> had this to say:
>
> My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:
>
>> Hi Galen:
>> Thanks for the very useful reference. It appears that one has to
>> have 3 users to do copy files to a new user profile.
>> Also, I was unclear what is the relevance of taking ownership of a
>> folder or file. Why would I want to do this?
>> Thanks, CMA
>
> Because when you try to copy the other profile it might tell you that you
> don't have permission to do so and so you'll need to take ownership of the
> file(s) before you can move them. <g> I just wanted to save you the effort
> of asking another question as it was the next logical problem you might
> encounter.
>
> Galen
> --
>
> "But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
> without them."
>
> Sherlock Holmes
>
July 8, 2005 10:35:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

In news:ePoEhtAhFHA.3436@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
cmar <cma16@yahoo.com> had this to say:

My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

> This method worked quite well with a few exceptions. And since you
> know so much, I will try you with these last few details.
>
> In the new profile (to which I copied), Several icons have
> disappeared from Desktop: My Computer; Network Neighborhood; My Documents.
> Also, the Start Menu is no longer the Classic Start Menu. Can I get
> that back.

Sure can. Right click the start button, select properties, and then put a
click in the classic start menu option. Click OK. Then, just to be
different, start > run > type "control desktop" without the quotes > hit
enter > click desktop tab > click Customize Desktop > and play around in
there for a bit if you'd like.

Galen
--

"But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
without them."

Sherlock Holmes
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 12:49:30 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

Great work, Galen, everything is perfect. You really know your stuff.

But you said this in a prior post: "I should warn you that a limited account
or power user is better security-wise."
So is there a way to change one of two Administrator accounts to a Power
User Account and use that most of the time, except when some Administrator
task is required?
Or if not, should I create a Power User account and copy the settings of
one of the administrator accounts to it?
Thanks, CMA




"Galen" <galennews@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:u9Hxd1AhFHA.2632@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> In news:ePoEhtAhFHA.3436@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
> cmar <cma16@yahoo.com> had this to say:
>
> My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:
>
>> This method worked quite well with a few exceptions. And since you
>> know so much, I will try you with these last few details.
>>
>> In the new profile (to which I copied), Several icons have
>> disappeared from Desktop: My Computer; Network Neighborhood; My
>> Documents.
>> Also, the Start Menu is no longer the Classic Start Menu. Can I get
>> that back.
>
> Sure can. Right click the start button, select properties, and then put a
> click in the classic start menu option. Click OK. Then, just to be
> different, start > run > type "control desktop" without the quotes > hit
> enter > click desktop tab > click Customize Desktop > and play around in
> there for a bit if you'd like.
>
> Galen
> --
>
> "But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
> without them."
>
> Sherlock Holmes
>
July 10, 2005 2:52:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

In news:o 0VfUAChFHA.2840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
cmar <cma16@yahoo.com> had this to say:

My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

> Great work, Galen, everything is perfect. You really know your stuff.
>
> But you said this in a prior post: "I should warn you that a limited
> account or power user is better security-wise."
> So is there a way to change one of two Administrator accounts to a
> Power User Account and use that most of the time, except when some
> Administrator task is required?
> Or if not, should I create a Power User account and copy the settings
> of one of the administrator accounts to it?
> Thanks, CMA
>

Assuming that you're not using the actual Administrator account (one with
your name or something like that will be best for this) and I believe that's
what you've done. You've set up the account, copied profiles over, made the
desktop be the same, and have permissions setup for ownership if needed.
Next you'll want to run the "control userpasswords2" command from the start
> run box. There you'll see a list of names. Highlight the account you are
using (I'm not sure if you'll have to log out then log in as admin to do
this but I don't THINK you have to) and click properties. Under group
membership tab, tick the Other, in the drop down menu select power user.
(You can always change it back later if there's something you want to
change.) Note that Power Users Group is only available in XP Pro.

Here's a bit about managing groups in XP Pro:

http://www.mcmcse.com/microsoft/guides/manage_groups.sh...

Here's some additional links as well:

http://www.google.com/search?num=100&hl=en&lr=&newwindo...

The reason I suggest Power Users is because I feel Limited Users are often
too restricted for the average person's usage of their PC. The Power User
has many of the same rights as the admin while there's some restrictions
about major system-wide changes. It's a whole safety issue, running as an
admin level means that when you do things like open your web browser that
application has the same rights to the OS as you do (or, more accurately,
you have allowed it to have in your settings.)

Galen
--

"But there are always some lunatics about. It would be a dull world
without them."

Sherlock Holmes
!