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Upgrade

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November 28, 2010 2:26:34 AM

hello. im upgrading my cpu i currently have a 4800+ Brisbane and want to replace it but i do not know how to i have a f690gvm mobo and on cpu-z it says package socket am2 (940) and i do not know how to use this info lol so please offer suggestions

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a c 131 à CPUs
November 28, 2010 2:59:33 AM

A motherboard model without the brand is rather useless. But my research indicates it could be an OEM (original equipment manufacturer, ie, a company that builds your computer for you) motherboard. I will get to that later.

You are interested in upgrading your CPU but are unsure what CPUs you can get. You are possibly also no knowledgeable about how to upgrade a CPU. There are several things to consider when choosing a CPU.

1. Socket: This is the physical socket that the CPU will fit in. AM2 was introduced a number of years back but AMD has kept all it's latest CPUs physically compatible. Here is a list of compatible CPUs
Athlon 64 (AM2 version not 939 version)
Athlon 7xxx series
Phenom
Athlon II
Phenom II

Even though the latter two are listed as AM3, they are physically compatible with the AM2 socket and will work with it.

2. Wattage: The motherboard must be able to handle the CPUs power. The motherboard will have a rating and it is not recommended to insert a CPU in the motherboard that is beyond that rating. However, if you do not know or cannot find out this rating, I recommend taking the safe route and not getting a CPU with a higher TDP than the TDP of your current CPU. In your case, the 4800+ brisbane is 65W. It is also likely with a motherboard as old as yours and considering that it is an OEM board that it does not support anything higher than 65W. This limits your options to CPUs of a not huge performance increase or of a high price because it is a low-power version. Note that the previous may not be compatible with your motherboard as explained in the following.

3. Bios support: This is the kicker for OEM computers. Even if it would work fine, OEMs never get motherboard updates that introduce new CPU support. Therefore, it may never work. And there is no real way of knowing without testing.
The only "for sure" CPUs compatible with your motherboard would be the ones that were originally listed as options for your computer.

Now that said, there is a much easier and relieving way to solve all these issues: purchase a new motherboard along with your new CPU. Newer AM2+ motherboards are available with wattage support up to 125-140W with completely updated bioses for less than $100. This is a decent mATX board that will fit virtually all computer cases, supports your current components and comes at a low price. The only cravat is that is only has two memory dimm slots.

Now, you must also consider the CPU you want. You want to replace your current CPU but you have not given your pricerange, uses or anything else that is very important for making such a purchase. CPUs range from $50 to $1100 depending on what you can afford and what you need.
Also consider your reasons for upgrading and enlighten us. It is possible your CPU is not the problem.
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November 28, 2010 2:23:28 PM

thunderandawe said:
hello. im upgrading my cpu i currently have a 4800+ Brisbane and want to replace it but i do not know how to i have a f690gvm mobo and on cpu-z it says package socket am2 (940) and i do not know how to use this info lol so please offer suggestions


Hello,

Well if your planning on upgrading your CPU then you should check out this website. http://www.cpu-upgrade.com/, I use it all the time. Just type in the make of your motherboard and it should give you a list of processors you can have.
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November 28, 2010 5:32:47 PM

:o  thats a great mobo that you recommended i think ill buy that and it supports a 125 watt processor :D  i am going to buy this and thank you but ill have to take my old mobo out and have it reinstalled by a expert because i have no idea on how to do that lol im a noob when putting new hardware in.
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November 28, 2010 5:34:49 PM

lol its out of stock :cry:  i am pretty sure ital fit in my case as seeing my old one is an mATX anyway so.
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a c 131 à CPUs
November 28, 2010 6:54:38 PM

thunderandawe said:
yes


enzo matrix said:
Now, you must also consider the CPU you want. You want to replace your current CPU but you have not given your pricerange, uses or anything else that is very important for making such a purchase. CPUs range from $50 to $1100 depending on what you can afford and what you need.
Also consider your reasons for upgrading and enlighten us. It is possible your CPU is not the problem.


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November 28, 2010 7:34:46 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... that's what im thinking of buying but i still don't know if the mobo you gave me was compatible but i know it can support it because its 125 watts which is a lot but hey. and im upgrading because i see on heavily dependent CPU games like empire total war that my graphics card is doing OK but not the cpu
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November 28, 2010 9:33:32 PM

i need to know what psu my comp can be compatible with lol idk what to do :cry: 
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November 28, 2010 11:08:48 PM

using the one i have
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a c 131 à CPUs
November 29, 2010 1:15:37 AM

There shouldn't be an issue upgrading your CPU to either with your current setup if you get a new motherboard, especially if your computer came with a dedicated video card.

What video card do you have now? How do you know it can handle it?

Note that the first CPU you showed does not come with a heatsink and your current one wouldn't be able to handle the heat of the 940. They go for about $15-20 for something that will be good enough for you.
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November 29, 2010 10:37:20 PM

umm we might ha slight problem in my psu development here i opened my computer up i i think my psu in fact atx instead of micro i looked on the sticker and in no where did it say micro ATX so i am sorry rofl
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November 29, 2010 10:52:22 PM

well i am saying that my power supply is atx instead of micro so my mobo must be atx and it looks like the psu that my comp came with is like custom fitted for my case which i didn't request it says on the sticker, this psu is manufactured for acer and idk if that suggesting anything but, so now i think i might need a mobo that is atx and a psu that is atx and i cant belive its eluded me through out this forum but i apologize.
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a c 131 à CPUs
November 30, 2010 12:31:26 AM

thunderandawe said:
well i am saying that my power supply is atx instead of micro so my mobo must be atx and it looks like the psu that my comp came with is like custom fitted for my case which i didn't request it says on the sticker, this psu is manufactured for acer and idk if that suggesting anything but, so now i think i might need a mobo that is atx and a psu that is atx and i cant belive its eluded me through out this forum but i apologize.

Why would the physical dimensions of your power supply have anything to do with the physical dimensions of your motherboard?

ATX has to do with size compatibility, not electrical compatibility. ATX is a standard size and micro ATX is a smaller version. Like I said, it has nothing to do with electrical compatibility.
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November 30, 2010 12:34:32 AM

oh well i didnt know i just thought everything had to be compatible down to the size and dimension's i am now wondering what the maximum size of psu my case can hold
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a c 131 à CPUs
November 30, 2010 12:36:32 AM

thunderandawe said:
oh well i didnt know i just thought everything had to be compatible down to the size and dimension's i am now wondering what the maximum size of psu my case can hold

ATX. Because your current PSU is ATX.
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November 30, 2010 1:05:12 AM

lol .... i know that but i mean like what wattage 450 or 1200 lol i meant how big of a psu i dont think it can go over 450 watts lol
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a c 131 à CPUs
November 30, 2010 10:21:01 AM

thunderandawe said:
lol .... i know that but i mean like what wattage 450 or 1200 lol i meant how big of a psu i dont think it can go over 450 watts lol

Wattage has nothing to do with physical size and fitting in your case.
Wattage has to do with the amount of power your computer needs. The wattage rating on a PSU is the maximum amount of power it can provide. But I can't tell you what wattage is good enough for you without you telling us the rest of your system components, especially if you have a video card.
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November 30, 2010 6:55:36 PM

lol i need a 500 watt psu after all the upgrades im going to get and i have a ati radeon 5670 i gig and a 25 inch moniter so
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a c 131 à CPUs
November 30, 2010 11:10:42 PM

thunderandawe said:
lol i need a 500 watt psu after all the upgrades im going to get and i have a ati radeon 5670 i gig and a 25 inch moniter so

Note that the monitor is powered from a plug in the wall though, not the power supply in your computer.

And after reading what you just said I have reinterpreted what I think you mean by this:
i know that but i mean like what wattage 450 or 1200 lol i meant how big of a psu i dont think it can go over 450 watts

The voltage is standard. Wattage is voltage multiplied by current. The rating is the maximum wattage that can be drawn without blowing up the PSU. So like I said, voltage does not change but the current does. A power supply will only supply as much power as is drawn. For example, you could have a 500 kilowatt power supply but if the components only need 500W, they will only draw 500W. Their need also varies with the load. Gaming my desktop needs more than idling.
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December 1, 2010 12:06:54 AM

so if i got all the facts here i can go get the mobo the processor and the psu and they would fit in my comp ? and ill worry about bios i think i got that handled
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December 11, 2010 2:03:55 PM

Best answer selected by thunderandawe.
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a b à CPUs
December 11, 2010 3:56:01 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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