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I7-930 build - Compatibility check + thoughts

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September 6, 2010 12:02:36 AM

APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: this week – unless I should wait for some reason
BUDGET RANGE: <$800 After Rebates without CPU (I own it already)
SYSTEM USAGE: gaming- starcraft II, surfing the internet, multi-tasking between MS Apps, Visual Studio, etc.
PARTS NOT REQUIRED: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers, OS, CPU
PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS: newegg
COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: USA
PARTS PREFERENCES: see below
OVERCLOCKING: Probably not
SLI OR CROSSFIRE: Maybe later on
MONITOR RESOLUTION: 1680x1050, 1920x1200 if I can get use to it

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

Purchased an i7-930 CPU, looking to keep the budget low if possible with combo deals. I’ve found a pretty solid build listed below, would like to know if all parts are;

1. Compatible
2. Best selection for price
3. Suited for my needs

Processor: i7 930 - $200
Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-X58A-UD3R $180 with code
RAM: G.SKILL PI Series 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 $149
Graphics Card: GIGABYTE GV-N460OC-768I GeForce GTX 460 (Fermi) 768MB 192-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card $180
Case: Rosewill DESTROYER w/three fans
+
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" $80
Power Supply: COOLER MASTER Silent Pro M600 RS-600-AMBA-D3 600W ATX12V V2.3 SLI Certified CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active ... $70
DVD Burner: Sony Optiarc CD/DVD Burner Black SATA Model AD-7261S-0B LightScribe $20
Total: $890 shipped

Summary:

I was going to build an AMD X4/X6 system, then started leaning towards the i5-750, but ended up picking up the i7-930 from a relative who works for Intel. I did not anticipate the extra costs for RAM and the Mobo… That said, I was looking at roughly a $700/$800 AMD/i5 build, but only an extra $150 for my i7 build above. Figured I’d go for the latest technology (within reason) to help with the lifecycle.

Good move, bad move? Thoughts?

Also, can I get away with that video card? I really don’t want to spend $50 more for the 1GB version, what will I be missing out on?
September 6, 2010 12:05:24 AM

Bad move in general in that an AMD build would've allowed you to get a better GPU, while an i5-760 outperforms that i7 in gaming for less without the associated mobo+ram costs.

I would definitely grab 30$ to move up a 1GB 460.
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September 6, 2010 12:35:29 AM

sp12 said:
Bad move in general in that an AMD build would've allowed you to get a better GPU, while an i5-760 outperforms that i7 in gaming for less without the associated mobo+ram costs.

I would definitely grab 30$ to move up a 1GB 460.

Gaming is a minimal need for me, actually just the one game, SCII which is why I asked if I can skimp a bit on the GPU.

The architecture of the Intel chip seems to be a better bet over the AMD's according to some.

So your saying that a $700 - $800 AMD build trumps the i7930 build I have going for an extra $150?

Also, doesnt the mobo and extra ram needed for the i7 selection out perform/future proof a bit over the 1156/4gb route?

I suppose I could sell the chip if there's a better build with better bang for buck but I got the vibe that the 930 chip was the chip to get if I could swing the extra associated costs.
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September 6, 2010 12:41:46 AM

1GB is a better buy. The 768 becomes Vram limited fast. Intel architecture is definitely faster, but an X6+SSD would probably have been much more noticeable for multitasking.

If it's not for gaming, then anything made in the last 2 years would probably be fine.

It trumps it in price/performance, but probably will lose (depending on the app) in price/performance. Realistically you could've gotten away with a tricore athlon and have been just as fine.

Mobo does not outperform, and the ram may or may not be relevant, that's for you to decide. It's not more future proof in that RAM is a drop in upgrade, you just add more.
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September 6, 2010 4:41:20 AM

bump
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September 6, 2010 3:17:42 PM

sp12 said:
1GB is a better buy. The 768 becomes Vram limited fast. Intel architecture is definitely faster, but an X6+SSD would probably have been much more noticeable for multitasking.

If it's not for gaming, then anything made in the last 2 years would probably be fine.

It trumps it in price/performance, but probably will lose (depending on the app) in price/performance. Realistically you could've gotten away with a tricore athlon and have been just as fine.

Mobo does not outperform, and the ram may or may not be relevant, that's for you to decide. It's not more future proof in that RAM is a drop in upgrade, you just add more.

Thanks for the tip on the 1GB card, can one get away with a 5770? What performance gains will I see with the 460?

Its not made specifically for gaming, as I said I will use this for everyday computing, MS Apps heavy in excel, Access, Visual Studio / Vb.net, C#, etc. General internet surfing, video streaming, etc. I have one game I wish to get back into as I played the first version a ton when I was in my early 20's, and that is Starcraft II. I have it sitting on my desk and I drool everyday wishing I could fire it up.

I opted for the i7 build because as I said, I can build the above for about $890. The AMD x4 955 build that I initially was spec'ing was at $750 ish. Had a few discussions on here about the i5 750 but many individuals suggested that if I could afford it, the i7930 was the way to go. So for an extra $150 or so, I was able to move into that platform with the higher end mobo, 6gb's of ram, and chip. I mean performance of the mobo in the sense that it comes with sata III and USB 3.0, and its one of the latest technologies so that down the road 2-3 years my computer will still be decent. (Hopefully) Logic here is to buy a pc every 3 years with as close to the latest technology as possible.

I don't see how this logic is flawed or that my move was "bad" due to the fact that it was such a small price difference for a better machine in general. The X6 + SSD is enticing, but that wasn't in the running. It was an X4 955 and i5 750 for around $750, or this build for around $900ish, all with the same specs other than the chip, ram and mobo. This seemed like the route to go.
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September 6, 2010 3:28:34 PM

How does this card stack up to the 460 1gb card gigabyte also makes for my build?

This sells for $170 right now after rebate: GIGABYTE GV-R583UD-1GD Radeon HD 5830 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card
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September 6, 2010 3:44:21 PM

Timop said:
The 5830 to get now is this for $150: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Whats your spec list now? Its getting a little fuzzy with the spec changes here and there.

Same as initial post above still. There's been a few debates with my choice of build for requirements (listed above), I could always sell the 930 to a friend but I thought I've done quite well with selections for $890. I was only able to spec out a i5-750 build or an x4 955 for $150 less with similar parts so I figured the i7930 was the better option. no?

Processor: i7 930 - $200
Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-X58A-UD3R $180 with code
RAM: G.SKILL PI Series 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 $149
Graphics Card: GIGABYTE GV-N460OC-768I GeForce GTX 460 (Fermi) 768MB 192-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card $180
Case: Rosewill DESTROYER w/three fans
+
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" $80
Power Supply: COOLER MASTER Silent Pro M600 RS-600-AMBA-D3 600W ATX12V V2.3 SLI Certified CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active ... $70
DVD Burner: Sony Optiarc CD/DVD Burner Black SATA Model AD-7261S-0B LightScribe $20
Total: $890 shipped
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September 6, 2010 4:01:45 PM

$150 is a substantial savings, especially considering how the 750 isn't any much slower than the 930.

The 930 build is still nice though, However, Id switch to a better case and this PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... , you get 200W more power and more efficiency for $5 less.
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September 6, 2010 4:22:42 PM

Timop said:
$150 is a substantial savings, especially considering how the 750 isn't any much slower than the 930.

The 930 build is still nice though, However, Id switch to a better case and this PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... , you get 200W more power and more efficiency for $5 less.


My thought process was that the i7 chip came with hyperthreading, the mobo required offered a better future proofing capability, and the extra ram. $150 came from the mobo and ram upgrade, the chip was purchased for less than the i5 750 at the time.

I selected corsair as some on here say PSU brands can be unreliable and that corsair and coolmaster were decent brands. How does the xfx standup to those brands for reliability?

If I were to select a different case, what would you suggest given my build? Also, is the 5830 gpu sufficient or does the 460 blow it out of the water? Someone on here stated that Radeon was more compatible with AMD and Nvidia/geforce was more compatible with intel.

Its all hearsay so its all so hard to figure out whos right, whats bs, and whats a need vs. bells and whistles...ugh.
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September 6, 2010 4:27:06 PM

XFX is actually a bit nicer than Corsair overall. They both use Seasonic/PCP as their OEM. XFX only has a 5 year warranty though.

460 beats the 5830, but as such the 5830s had a ton of price drops since the 460 launched. It's not a bad card for ~150$.

In my opinion the i5 would've been better, but it's not like your purchased 'bad' components, they'll run fine.
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September 6, 2010 4:33:57 PM

josh2010 said:
My thought process was that the i7 chip came with hyperthreading, the mobo required offered a better future proofing capability, and the extra ram. $150 came from the mobo and ram upgrade, the chip was purchased for less than the i5 750 at the time.

I selected corsair as some on here say PSU brands can be unreliable and that corsair and coolmaster were decent brands. How does the xfx standup to those brands for reliability?

If I were to select a different case, what would you suggest given my build? Also, is the 5830 gpu sufficient or does the 460 blow it out of the water? Someone on here stated that Radeon was more compatible with AMD and Nvidia/geforce was more compatible with intel.

Its all hearsay so its all so hard to figure out whos right, whats bs, and whats a need vs. bells and whistles...ugh.

I'm sorry, but Coolermaster PSUs are a hit or miss, no where near the quality of Corsair.
The XFX is a Seasonic build, which is one of the best in the industry.

HT isn't going to benefit you much, maybe the RAM but only limited to very memory sensitive programs. How did you save $150 on RAM/Mobo though did you pick out a H55 board? Looking at the prices over, I think you are getting a good deal on the 930 build.

The 5830 is maybe 5 percent worse than the 460 768 MB. The things about compatibility is pure BS. The only thing is, Nvidia chipsets can only SLI, AMD chipsets can only CFX, and Newer Intel Chipsets can do both.

On the case, Id say something along the lines of a 690 or 922, maybe a Lancool even. A rosewill case is just a bit too cheap for a i7 build, not saying it wont work fine.
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September 6, 2010 4:43:03 PM

Timop said:
I'm sorry, but Coolermaster PSUs are a hit or miss, no where near Corsair.
The XFX is a Seasonic build, which is one of the best in the industry.

HT isn't going to benefit you much, maybe the RAM but only limited to very memory sensitive programs. How did you save $150 on RAM/Mobo though did you pick out a H55 board? Looking at the prices over, I think you are getitng a good deal on the 930 build.

The 5830 is maybe 5 percent worse than the 460 1GB. The things about compatibility is pure BS. The only thing is, Nvidia chipsets can only SLI, AMD chipsets can only CFX, and Newer Intel Chipsets can do both.


My build sits at $850 shipped as listed below. I was stating that because of my Intel hookup on the chip, I only had to pay $150 more to migrate to a 1366 board with 6gb of ram (3 slots x 2gb sticks). At the time I wasn't aware that I couldn't go with a 1156 board and 4gb of ram, so I ordered the i7 chip thinking that if I could get it for less than what the i5 is on newegg, I scored. Didn't anticipate the extra costs with the 1366 mobo and ram because i was unaware that i had to go with the more expensive parts at the time of the order.

So that said, I paid about $100 more (plus $50 floated to my relative for scoring me the chip as a kind gesture) to go with the i7 build I have been spec'ing over an i5 build with the same specs (diff. mobo and ram) from newegg. This is why I picked up the i7930 chip.

Its frustrating to hear that I would have been just as content with an i5 build...

So that said, how is it that an i5 build would be identical to the i7 build when the i7 chip is more and the mobo seems to be better with the added RAM? Can you guys help me understand this?

Processor: i7 930 - $200
Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-X58A-UD3R $180 with code
RAM: G.SKILL PI Series 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 $149
Graphics Card: 5830 suggested at $150
Case: Rosewill DESTROYER w/three fans
+
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" $80
Power Supply: XFX P1-650X-CAH9 650W ATX12V v2.2 / ESP12V v2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Power ... $70
DVD Burner: Sony Optiarc CD/DVD Burner Black SATA Model AD-7261S-0B LightScribe $20
Total: $848 shipped (Actually: $798 + $50 for relative hookup dinner)
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September 6, 2010 4:49:47 PM

place holder.
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Best solution

September 6, 2010 5:24:51 PM

josh2010 said:
My build sits at $850 shipped as listed below. I was stating that because of my Intel hookup on the chip, I only had to pay $150 more to migrate to a 1366 board with 6gb of ram (3 slots x 2gb sticks). At the time I wasn't aware that I couldn't go with a 1156 board and 4gb of ram, so I ordered the i7 chip thinking that if I could get it for less than what the i5 is on newegg, I scored. Didn't anticipate the extra costs with the 1366 mobo and ram because i was unaware that i had to go with the more expensive parts at the time of the order.

So that said, I paid about $100 more (plus $50 floated to my friend for scoring me the chip as a kind gesture) to go with the i7 build I have been spec'ing over an i5 build with the same specs (diff. mobo and ram) from newegg. This is why I picked up the i7930 chip.

Its frustrating to hear that I would have been just as content with an i5 build...

So that said, how is it that an i5 build would be identical to the i7 build when the i7 chip is more and the mobo seems to be better with the added RAM? Can you guys help me understand this?

Processor: i7 930 - $200
Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-X58A-UD3R $180 with code
RAM: G.SKILL PI Series 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 $149
Graphics Card: 5830 suggested at $150
Case: Rosewill DESTROYER w/three fans
+
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" $80
Power Supply: XFX P1-650X-CAH9 650W ATX12V v2.2 / ESP12V v2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Power ... $70
DVD Burner: Sony Optiarc CD/DVD Burner Black SATA Model AD-7261S-0B LightScribe $20
Total: $848 shipped


To get started, the i5 and i7 have identical CPU cores, the only difference is the Memory controller, how HT is disabled on the i5 and the X58 chipset.

On the memory controller, with dual channel you get 2*64=128bit memory bandwidth, as with triple channel you get 3*64=192bit, using the same speed of RAM, you will have a theoretical 33% jump in bandwidth. However, it is shown the difference between using DDR3 1600 and DDR3 1333 (20% difference) on gaming is barely noticeable so for you the better IMC is just a feature.

Then it comes to HT, contrary to some rumours, HT is not another core. It just separates a task into 2 threads and technically process it more efficiently. But only a select programs support it, and it is known to hurt performance in games when turned on, http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/cpu/display/core-i7-97... .

Finally the X58 chipset, with i5s, the whole NB is on the CPU its self, so due to space constraints, it is limited to a single X16 PCIe link, while with X58 its on the Mobo allowing for 2. However, the bandwidth deficiency only affect high-end GPUs like the GTX480, and only about 4% or so in SLI. There are no differences with single card. So unless you plan to eventually upgrade into 2 GTX480s, youll be fine.

The i7 does have extra features to justify for its higher asking price, but for you, none of them will benefit much unfortunately.
If your really want to save money, you can use 4GB on the i7 to bring down the cost a little, But Id rather get the full 6.

On the case, the V6 is nice. Forgot to say this earlier, upgrade that HDD, the AAKS is old and slow compared to 7200.12s and F3s.
This combo + fans is not a bad option either: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

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September 7, 2010 2:03:08 AM

Best answer selected by josh2010.
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September 7, 2010 2:05:51 AM

Thanks for everyones help, purchased the following and can't wait to put it together!
Processor: i7 930
Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-X58A-UD3R
RAM: Corsair XMS3 6GB
Graphics Card: 5830 suggested at
Case: Thermaltake V6
Hard Drive: Samsung F3 1TB
Power Supply: XFX P1-650X-CAH9 650W ATX12V v2.2 / ESP12V v2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Power
DVD Burner: Sony Optiarc CD/DVD Burner Black SATA Model AD-7261S-0B LightScribe
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