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Electric shock from PC chassis

Last response: in Components
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November 29, 2010 7:30:41 AM

Hi guys,
I just built my system a few days ago and today, when I touched my chassis, I could feel electricity being passed to me. It is continous and not just a single shock.
The strength of the current gets stronger as it approaches the top of the PC and is weakest at the bottom.
So I suspected PSU, and after I turned on the PC with the PSU only using the metal clip method, the electricity comes in. The PSU cable provided
Would like to ask if this is normal.

Just to add on that I am more or less sure that this is not static, because it is contionous and also, the relative humudity level here is so damn high that static doesnt build up (tropical weather).

thanks

More about : electric shock chassis

a b ) Power supply
November 29, 2010 7:43:26 AM

I have a TV set top that does the same thing (although with only a 2pin power plug so can't be grounded).
It's bizarre, it means you can't pick it up from one end with hand, unlike the other, because the electricity interferes with the nerve signals and it just feels too heavy.

Check with a different power cable, and as dip said, get your socket tested.
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November 29, 2010 7:43:59 AM

As we talking, I just replaced the power cable. The one coolermaster (PSU) provided is a two pin cable, (i dont know why...)
After switching to the standard 3 pin plug, the shock feeling is gone. I guess the current is directed to the ground.
Anyway, is it normal for PSU to leak like this?
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November 29, 2010 8:05:45 AM

anuclearbomb said:
As we talking, I just replaced the power cable. The one coolermaster (PSU) provided is a two pin cable, (i dont know why...)
After switching to the standard 3 pin plug, the shock feeling is gone. I guess the current is directed to the ground.
Anyway, is it normal for PSU to leak like this?


No, it indicates a problem with the wiring in your building. At least the redundant ground fixed the problem, but the "neutral" wire on an AC line should also have 0V compared to ground so...fix the building wiring?
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November 29, 2010 8:27:10 AM

Crashman said:
No, it indicates a problem with the wiring in your building. At least the redundant ground fixed the problem, but the "neutral" wire on an AC line should also have 0V compared to ground so...fix the building wiring?


Hmm...Thanks, I am relieved as long as the power supply or the PC isnt at fault :D 

O, fixing the building is out of question. 80% of the population in my country lives in apartment buildings (including me), and to play around with wirings in your house, you need a permit to do so. LOL

Er, just to confirm, changing to a 3 pin plug would solve the problem right?
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November 29, 2010 9:02:57 AM

anuclearbomb said:
Hmm...Thanks, I am relieved as long as the power supply or the PC isnt at fault :D 

O, fixing the building is out of question. 80% of the population in my country lives in apartment buildings (including me), and to play around with wirings in your house, you need a permit to do so. LOL

Er, just to confirm, changing to a 3 pin plug would solve the problem right?


Yes, the wire for the third prong is called "earth ground" and in the U.S. commonly goes to a metal pipe that's been buried for several feet of its length.

Of course there is a problem in some countries about electricians wiring the other two connectors in REVERSE...
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November 29, 2010 11:57:06 AM

Had a friend of mine was moving into a brand new (just built) apartment, and as he was hooking up his washer and dryer, he just happened to get out his handy meter only to discover that not only were the AC lines crossed, but the earth ground was also crossed as well. He stopped everything he was doing right then and called the landlord and explained the situation. At first they didn't trust his assessment until he told them:

1) He was an Electrical Engineer
2) The crosswired building would send 240 volts through the first person who inadvertently touched the ground, to include any grounded appliance like a washer or dryer
3) He could sue both the owners of the building and the construction company for reckless endangerment, as the building had obviously not passed inspection, though the paperwork was all in order (he was able to see it still on the front window of the apartment)

Within a half hour, an electrician was out there working on it. A very abashed landlord called him the next day, apologizing to him and very grateful that it had been fixed before anything drastic (and more costly) had happened.

He also got two month free rent. Not a bad deal.

Be aware, if your building is crosswired, it is not just your appliances that are in danger, but you could also be in danger. Even if you aren't electrocuted, it can cause free sparks that could ignite flammable material.
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November 29, 2010 9:53:50 PM

Best answer selected by anuclearbomb.
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