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Setting up a web server

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  • Routers
  • Port Forwarding
  • Web Server
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
April 19, 2010 9:55:31 AM

I am looking to setup a new web server (not in my home using port forwarding) in my office where I have to host a mission critical php/mysql application(just a database workflow driven application). I have to publish a URL for the customers over internet to login. At a peak time, a maximum of 50 to 100 concurrent connections are possible. I have a 2MB full duplex leased line with a static IP from service provider.

Is there any one who can provide a guide or a detailed summary or any input on setting up a new server starting from hardware to the final implementation of the web server. I know security is a big concern and I have a good budget to buy firewalls and IPS module.

I am open to suggestion of what OS and server should be used.

Any help is appreciated.

More about : setting web server

Best solution

April 20, 2010 6:00:14 PM

You want to use either FreeBSD or Linux. IIS is going to cost a lot more, for both software licensing and hardware, and will NOT perform as good using PHP and MySQL (those are what I'd recommend anyway). Each has been ported to Windows, but were made for Unix, and are much more secure on it.

As far as configuration goes, you really need a consultant. No matter what you choose there are going to be hiccups that are going to take time to resolve, and good luck finding someone to do it for free.


EDIT: added hardware specs for web server

For FreeBSD or Linux these are the hardware specs I'd use. Keep in mind I wouldn't install an X server either; a command line install only:
CPU: newer dual core Celeron (you do not need a super computer..... I worked at an ISP hosting about 3 dozen domains on an old celeron)
CPU Cooling: a good heatsink for maximum reliability
Storage: about 500GB 7200RPM w/ 32MB of cache this way logs will never fill up the HD and crash the server; with 32MB cache and 7200RPM we have plenty of performance) and I'd even put in a fault tollerent RAID array to minimize downtime in the event of a crash.
RAM: 4GB RAM (1 - 2 would work so we want to double for reliabilities sake)
Video card: anything with reliable linux support that runs cool.
Nic: no wireless you want a good 3com NIC, don't skimp here and don't use wireless; reliability is key and and no network connection equates to downtime.
Cooling: a few quality 120mm case fans, heat is an enemy that ca cause downtime.

OF course if your budget is higher you could get a better CPU and more RAM, but I considered cost as a factor. And actually a quad-core 64-bit AMD Phenom X4 at 3.0Ghz would be a better CPU, too.
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April 21, 2010 4:13:35 AM

thanks rdc363 .. it was helpful and a bit of a shock that a dual core celeron can serve 3 dozen domains :s

I am trying to find some one to do it for free, but I can not .. and installation charges from consultatns are almost the same as hardware cost.

A basic diagram of the network setup and some instructions on the security concerns will be enough helpful for a start. Further it can be enhanced over the period of time.

I will get the domain and DNS service from the service provider along with a static IP and a leased line.

Any help is appreciated.
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April 21, 2010 5:23:51 AM

hazee said:
thanks rdc363 .. it was helpful and a bit of a shock that a dual core celeron can serve 3 dozen domains :s


w/o any backend processing, GUI interface, or SSL Apache is fairly efficient. http://www.everymanhosting.com/hosting/ It looks like they've upgraded to multiple Core 2 Quads's now.
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April 21, 2010 10:18:21 AM

rdc363 said:
You want to use either FreeBSD or Linux. IIS is going to cost a lot more, for both software licensing and hardware, and will NOT perform as good using PHP and MySQL (those are what I'd recommend anyway). Each has been ported to Windows, but were made for Unix, and are much more secure on it.


What do you think about Ubunto server edition?

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April 21, 2010 3:34:45 PM

Security should be your #1 concern. Any hacker who can find a web server facing the internet will use a wide variety of tools and exploits to steal your data. How much would it cost you if the database was hacked and the information stolen? What if the hacker threatened to go to all of your customers, that they got from the database, and tell them you were hacked, unless you send them $5000?

You may also want to consider a hosted solution, if they provide security / monitoring of your site.
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April 22, 2010 3:21:47 AM

hazee said:
What do you think about Ubunto server edition?

Never used it, for servers I use either Debian or FreeBSD. Debian is fairly simple to install and configure.
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July 13, 2010 9:02:29 AM

Best answer selected by buwish.
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