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Who has the Most Maxed Out system on Tom's?

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a b à CPUs
November 30, 2010 9:42:19 PM

Hello,
I was wondering since when your read the PC mags you hear about crazy systems.
Tom's represents the enthusiast crowd so I was wondering who has the Most Maxed Out system?
Also if you can back it up with CPU-Z,Everest or similar screenshots that would be great (just to weed out the daydreamers!).
I would like to see what is really being used out there.
Also only use your personal computer at home specs not your work supplied computer specs.
Thanks and have fun

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November 30, 2010 10:42:07 PM

my signature rig FTW. :fou: 
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a c 102 à CPUs
November 30, 2010 10:58:03 PM

king smp said:
Hello,
I was wondering since when your read the PC mags you hear about crazy systems.
Tom's represents the enthusiast crowd so I was wondering who has the Most Maxed Out system?
Also if you can back it up with CPU-Z,Everest or similar screenshots that would be great (just to weed out the daydreamers!).
I would like to see what is really being used out there.
Also only use your personal computer at home specs not your work supplied computer specs.
Thanks and have fun


I have a dual Opteron 6128 system (16 cores total) with 16 GB of RAM, two 40 GB OCZ Vertex2 SSDs, and four 2 TB Samsung F4EGs as my home workstation. That's just a bit more grunt in multithreaded applications than your typical Core i5 or i7 machine ;) 
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November 30, 2010 11:12:47 PM

well.... my dad has this crazy Cell broadband setup thing lol 8 racks or something :D 
Damn and all i got was 1 PS3....
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a b à CPUs
November 30, 2010 11:18:33 PM

^1 Malmental LMAO I have a Commodore 128 that will kick your ass!
^1 MU-Engineer What are you doing at home with that thing?! Calculating Space shuttle orbit trajectories?! "Would you like to play Thermonuclear War?"-War Games circa 1984
Well so far MU-Engineer is winning...
Anybody want to take a shot at the title?
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a b à CPUs
November 30, 2010 11:22:24 PM

MU_Engineer said:
I have a dual Opteron 6128 system (16 cores total) with 16 GB of RAM, two 40 GB OCZ Vertex2 SSDs, and four 2 TB Samsung F4EGs as my home workstation. That's just a bit more grunt in multithreaded applications than your typical Core i5 or i7 machine ;) 

What OS are you using?
Is there a Windows that recoginizes that many cores?
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a b à CPUs
December 1, 2010 12:33:38 AM

king smp said:
What OS are you using?
Is there a Windows that recoginizes that many cores?

Any 32-bit edition of Windows 7 can utilise 32 cores, and 64-bit ones can use 256 cores. Given that no edition supports more than 2 physical CPUs and Home Premium and lower only support one, you'd be hard-pressed to hit those limits anyway. Server 2008 R2 supports anywhere from 4-64 physical CPUs.
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a b à CPUs
December 1, 2010 1:17:33 AM

Thank you for a great answer.
That really clarified that for me.
I wish that was the original thread question so I can select you as best answer.
I still might...
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a c 102 à CPUs
December 1, 2010 1:33:37 AM

king smp said:
^1 Malmental LMAO I have a Commodore 128 that will kick your ass!
^1 MU-Engineer What are you doing at home with that thing?! Calculating Space shuttle orbit trajectories?! "Would you like to play Thermonuclear War?"-War Games circa 1984
Well so far MU-Engineer is winning...
Anybody want to take a shot at the title?


The heavy tasks I use my machine for are encoding video, backup image compression/decompression, and compiling my software packages from source. All of those are at least moderately multithreaded and quite a bit of it will peg all 16 cores when it's running. I also use my computer for more mundane tasks as well, right now that is mostly remote access type of stuff over a Citrix session.

king smp said:
What OS are you using?


Gentoo Linux amd64. In case you're wondering, it supports up to 256 cores in as many as 256 CPUs out of the box and up to 4096 cores in as many as 4096 CPUs with a patch.

Is there a Windows that recoginizes that many cores?[/quotemsg]

All of them. 32-bit versions of Windows 7 can support up to 32 cores and 64-bit versions can support up to 256 cores. However, it takes Windows 7 Enterprise or Ultimate to see a second CPU. Windows Server 2008 Standard would work too, as it can see up to four CPUs and 256 cores.

Quote:
bro.
that system of yours, c'mon tell the truth, what are the WEI scores:
cpu - 3.7
RAM - 5.5
gpu (you probably have a single ATi 2400HD) - 3.9 / 5.6
hdd - 4.7


you know it does.... :kaola: 

jk'n..


The truth is that is has no WEI score since I've never run Windows on the machine. You'd also know that I have a GTS250 as a GPU instead of a Radeon 2400 HD if you looked at my signature. The GTS250 is a lot less powerful than what most of you guys run here, but it was a carry-over from my old system and was (and still is) one of the best bang-for-the-buck cards out there. But I will run any Linux benchmark you want, provided that it's not a crack of some sort.
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a c 102 à CPUs
December 1, 2010 1:37:15 AM

randomizer said:
Given that no edition supports more than 2 physical CPUs and Home Premium and lower only support one, you'd be hard-pressed to hit those limits anyway. Server 2008 R2 supports anywhere from 4-64 physical CPUs.


No, just give it three or four years. AMD is already planning 20-core server CPUs for 2012, code-named "Terramar" and fitting into the successor socket to Socket G34. I'd expect that 32-core CPUs won't be more than a couple of years past that.
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a c 105 à CPUs
December 1, 2010 1:45:58 AM

you all fail

dual core abacus CPU


+

etch a sketch GPU


+

earth watt gerbil power


=

Crysis maxed out!
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a c 83 à CPUs
December 1, 2010 4:35:22 AM

^LMAO

I'm typing on a system with a Phenom X4 9850, 4Gb DDR2 800, 1Tb HDD, Radeon 4670. It sure won't win the title of best system at toms, but it's one of the best I've owned.
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a b à CPUs
December 1, 2010 4:53:44 AM

MU_Engineer said:
No, just give it three or four years.

I was obviously talking about the present and near future. Three or four years is not exactly right around the corner. :) 
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a b à CPUs
December 1, 2010 5:38:25 AM

MU_Engineer said:
I have a dual Opteron 6128 system (16 cores total) with 16 GB of RAM, two 40 GB OCZ Vertex2 SSDs, and four 2 TB Samsung F4EGs as my home workstation. That's just a bit more grunt in multithreaded applications than your typical Core i5 or i7 machine ;) 


I have to say, I'm a bit jealous of your RAM. Just recently, I was running some finite element analysis, and I was having a heck of a time getting it to work without exceeding the available 12GB of RAM. Sometime, I may break down and bump my system up to 24GB, but it's really hard to justify for the cost right now (even though I do run up against my 12GB limit relatively frequently).
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a c 92 à CPUs
December 1, 2010 6:05:41 AM

@ct1615, thats god damn hillarious! Feed that gerbil some coffee for overclocking. I also suggest you SLI the etch a sketch...if your budget can stretch.
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December 1, 2010 7:23:33 AM

iam2thecrowe said:
I also suggest you SLI the etch a sketch...if your budget can stretch.


You've got it all wrong. :non: 

Clearly the red Etch A Sketch is an ATI/AMD card, therefore...


C-C-C-CrossFireX! :p 
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a b à CPUs
December 1, 2010 9:34:52 AM

Nice answer MU.
I figured you would be using a distro of Linux instead of Windows.
Do you run any VMs?
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a c 102 à CPUs
December 1, 2010 10:22:07 AM

randomizer said:
I was obviously talking about the present and near future. Three or four years is not exactly right around the corner. :) 


When roughly half of Windows users are still using an OS released in 2001 and the successor to that 2001 OS didn't come until 2007, three or four years is just right around the corner.
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a c 102 à CPUs
December 1, 2010 10:30:20 AM

king smp said:
Nice answer MU.
I figured you would be using a distro of Linux instead of Windows.
Do you run any VMs?


Yes, I occasionally do.
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a b à CPUs
December 1, 2010 11:32:17 AM

MU_Engineer said:
Yes, I occasionally do.

I figured with 16 cores that system can run about14 vms each with a core and a gig of ram.
Freakin' awesome man.
I sent you a private message regarding SAS 300 sata card. If you get a chance to read it that would be great.
So far your the winner of Tom's unofficial Most Maxed Out system award 2010 or the "M.M.O.s".
Is there any Xeon guys out there who want to represent?
We can't let a Dual Opty guy take the crown!!!
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a c 102 à CPUs
December 1, 2010 1:17:48 PM

Quote:
^
I saw the signature but the GTS250 scores nice in WEI, I'm trying to NOT give your system TOO much credit.. :kaola: 
I wish I had one just like it.. :D 


Maybe you do, maybe you don't.

On the plus side, the board + CPU + 16 GB RAM cost a little under $1300, which is noticeably less than what a six-core Intel i7 build will run you with anywhere near the same specs but it will outperform that six-core i7 build in the vast majority of highly-multithreaded benchmarks, usually by a pretty good margin. You can also stuff up to 256 GB of RAM in the unit too since it supports 16 GB registered DIMMs when they come out. You can use pretty much the same parts that you'd pick for a desktop build too. The board fits into most full-tower cases, you don't need a huge PSU unless your GPUs need one (I use a 650-watt unit) , and CrossFire GPU setups work, although unofficially. It will also use just about any kind of DDR3 memory except for notebook SO-DIMMs- regular desktop unbuffered non-ECC memory, unbuffered ECC workstation memory (which is what I use), or registered ECC server memory. It also will be a very reliable and can be upgraded to Bulldozer-based CPUs next year with only a BIOS update needed. The particular case I used for this unit is great, too. It's an enormous double-wide tower case that fits 12 5.25" bays and two 3.5" bays alongside the motherboard compartment. The case will fit two PSUs underneath the motherboard tray and the tray will fit up to a 16.5" by 13" quad-socket server motherboard that's significantly bigger than my 12"x13" EATX board. It was a real joy to build a machine in due to the size and layout, and I frequently get comments of "cool, you have a fridge right next to your computer desk!"

On the down side, this is not an enthusiast gamer rig. You cannot overclock the CPUs or RAM at all. It also only supports RAM up to DDR3-1333 speeds at the moment, timings are limited to the JEDEC-standard ones found in the DIMMs' SPDs (so DDR3-1333 at 9-9-9-24), and RAM voltage cannot be higher than 1.50 volts. You can run 1.20 V and 1.35 V low-voltage RAM in this system, but then you're limited to DDR3-1066 speeds at the present. You also need to shell out for Windows 7 Ultimate to be able to use both CPUs. You also have to use heatsinks specifically made for Socket G34, which basically gives you two heatsinks to choose from, and they are similar in design and size to the stock AMD heatsink for 125 W and 140 W desktop CPUs. You're not going to be able to put your TRUE or anything of that ilk on a G34 board, although you can use Koolance's expensive CPU-360 water blocks and water cool the system. Also, the Opteron 6128s won't outperform something as inexpensive as an Athlon II X3 in just about every game out there despite the board + CPUs costing a grand more than an Athlon II X3 and a decent AM3 board. Most games can't take good advantage of more than three or four cores. Games do love clock speed on the cores they do use though, and the Opteron 6128s are only clocked at 2.0 GHz. I'm not saying you can't play games on this machine, but that if you're only looking at gaming, this is not the machine to get. While I really like the case, even it is not all that well suited for desktop use. Tower heatsinks using bigger than about a 92 mm fan will hit against the side panel, it doesn't have a mounting bracket for ATX PSUs, and it doesn't even have a power switch, let alone front USB or audio ports. I ended up fabricating the PSU bracket out of some sheet steel and my trusty old Dremel and fabricating the power/reset switch assembly out of hardware store parts and some more sheet steel. I use a 3.5 mm headphone extension cable and USB extension cables to bring those interfaces to the front of the machine when needed. It ended up being great but it's not really ready to go right out of the box.

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a b à CPUs
December 2, 2010 11:27:16 AM

Best answer selected by king smp.
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a b à CPUs
December 2, 2010 11:28:18 AM

I hope you all had fun.
Merry Christmas,Happy New Year and Happy Holidays to everybody.
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a b à CPUs
December 2, 2010 11:35:23 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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