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First PC Build

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September 8, 2010 5:07:10 PM

Well, this is my first build, and was hoping for some feedback. I am looking for a fast machine, that will run photoshop easily and breeze through games. I also was shooting for expandability and upgradability. Here is what I am thinking of putting together.
Motherboard: ASUS P6X58D Premium
CPU:i7 950 3.06 GHz This one i'm questioning
GPU: Nvidia GTX 480 not SLI (YET)
HD: WD caviar black 1TB
wireless card, dvd burner,
PSU: Corsair modular 750
RAM: COrsair Dominator 1600/ 6gb

I don't plan on OC right away, may never do it if it is fast enough, but would like the option in future if needed. Any ideas? Right now I price out the parts around 2K including a case. Still need to buy Windows 7 though.

Other things I've considered is SSD, or RAID

Thanks!

More about : build

a b B Homebuilt system
September 8, 2010 5:16:39 PM

Alright, well if you want future upgradability, you need an AMD system. Both current intel boards will be replaced next year.

If you want pure gaming, then you need to spend a higher percentage of it spent on graphics stuff. Really depends on what you really want out of it.
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September 8, 2010 6:26:01 PM

If you are referring to the bloomfield processors, I believe this board is compatible. Is there another processor I should know about? Also, I didn't know if I really need the 1600 mhz ram, or if 1300 is significantly slower, etc. As far as more graphics stuff, where you thinking maybe SLI 460s instead?

Thanks for your help btw. I know everybody asks the same questions all the time on these forums.
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September 8, 2010 7:09:13 PM

Hes refering to the sandy bridge processers which will use a different socket so no more new processors for that motherboard. You wont notice a difference between 1600 and 1333.
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 9, 2010 1:26:39 AM

I would stick with what you've picked out; the Sandy Bridge CPUs are LGA 1155, not LGA 1366, so I feel like they're going to replace the LGA 1156 socket (it's really the most popular at the moment). AMD's performance isn't the same as Intel's. While the X6 1090T does well against the i7-920/930, it's the best that AMD has at the moment, will not best an i7-950, and costs the same as the 950.

If you want a fast-responding computer, you should try for a solid state drive. You'll see faster application response (for the main ones installed on the SSD). Games and such will still run quickly on a WD Black though, since it has a large cache, but really any hard drive @ 7200RPM will work fine.

As for RAM, it's your choice to stick to 1600 or 1333; I would shy away from Corsair memory though. It has issues going above 1066 because that's Intel's "limit." You have to set the speed manually in the BIOS, but Corsair RAM has issues doing that. Patriot and Kingston are probably the best, and G.Skill is both above average and cheaper (usually).

If you're looking to upgrade your GPUs in the future and can afford either a GTX 480 or 2 GTX 460, get the 480. Though 2 460s in SLI will beat 1 480, it's pointless if you plan to 2 or 3 way SLI the 480s at some point; 460s only do 2-way. If you can wait a few months, the GTX 490 is supposedly long overdue.
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 9, 2010 1:49:15 AM

They are replacing the 2 current sockets with 2 new sockets and any and all new CPU's will be on those. This includes the 1366 equivalent. So I'm not referring to any specific CPU. Just any and all new ones.

AMD's performance is not exactly the same as intels. This is true. But for gaming centric applications it's better to go for more/better graphics cards and spend less on the rest of the platform. Especially when it's a known fact that as soon as you want anything newer at all, you'll need at least another motherboard again. There is therefore much less of a reason to invest in the much more expensive intel platform. This is what I meant by spending a larger percentage of the budget on graphics.

You probably want a samsung spinpoint f3 for the hard drive.

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a b B Homebuilt system
September 9, 2010 2:52:36 PM

The X68 Chipset isn't going to be out until Q3 2011 (so literally about a year from now), and like the X58 when first released, it will be pricey. Most standard computer users, and even some hardcore gamers, don't upgrade the CPUs often (2-4 years usually).

There's really no point to looking into upgradeability for the chipset/CPU if the OP gets a good motherboard with several expansion slots for 2 or 3 GTX 480s. The whole setup will last him until he needs to upgrade again, at which point he would probably build an entirely new system.

As far as performance, if he 2 or 3-way SLIs the 480s, he'll need a good CPU. SLI's bottleneck is the CPU, and the i7-950 can more than handle it.

Samsung HDDs are also very good from what I hear; I personally stick to WD (really just personal preference).
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September 9, 2010 11:01:56 PM

Thanks for all your input. I am going with the patriot ram and samsung hdd. I looked up the compatibility of the ram for the motherboard so all should be well there. All else i think ill keep the same. It just seems so much better to build than to buy pre built. I decked out a dell the other day to see what I could get on it, and it wasn't SLI or crossfire compatible unless I went alienware. Anyway, Ill be back if I have probs setting it up. :)  If there is any other suggestions please chiime in. I am also getting the coolermaster 1000 cosmos s case.
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September 9, 2010 11:06:10 PM

any suggestions on a wireless card for this setup, and will it fit after that 480 gpu goes in?
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 9, 2010 11:17:03 PM

Yes, but in March 2008 I bought a brand new (it had just come out) 780g AM2+ chipset for $100,(it was the first one and it even supports the six-core if i wanted it) at the time like $30 for 2 gigs DDR2. Then a used dual core 4600+ athlon 64 for $30. At the time I still had a single core system when I did this.

Then in sep 2009 I bought a Phenom II x3 720 black, instantly boosting my system by quite a bit for only $120. (I had also before this gotten 2x2gigs on sale for $30, this was before one of the actual makers of the memory chips themselves literally exploded making the cost go up quite a bit for RAM)

You can't put together a competent system for intel anywhere near that low. You also can't pull things like that CPU drop-in upgrade. That's why it is important. It just seems super-high cost to me to get a$200-300 mobo that will only be in use for a few years.

But ultimately I guess at least it ain't my money.

As far as the case definitely go for one of the HAF cases instead of that. One of my friends has one and it runs hotter than mine because it just doesn't have the airflow mine has.
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 10, 2010 6:18:30 PM

Almost any wireless card will do; your motherboard should have PCI slots for them or you can plug in a PCI Express x1 card into one of the lower bandwidth x16 slots.

Just be aware of the different WiFi protocols: b, g, and n. b/g are in almost everything today, and n is just starting to take off. If you have a Wireless-N router, get a wireless N card. Pretty simple.
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 10, 2010 6:24:10 PM

False_Dmitry_II said:
Yes, but in March 2008 I bought a brand new (it had just come out) 780g AM2+ chipset for $100,(it was the first one and it even supports the six-core if i wanted it) at the time like $30 for 2 gigs DDR2. Then a used dual core 4600+ athlon 64 for $30. At the time I still had a single core system when I did this.

Then in sep 2009 I bought a Phenom II x3 720 black, instantly boosting my system by quite a bit for only $120. (I had also before this gotten 2x2gigs on sale for $30, this was before one of the actual makers of the memory chips themselves literally exploded making the cost go up quite a bit for RAM)

You can't put together a competent system for intel anywhere near that low. You also can't pull things like that CPU drop-in upgrade. That's why it is important. It just seems super-high cost to me to get a$200-300 mobo that will only be in use for a few years.


Intel's CPUs hold up quite well against their next-generation models; the i3's and i5's are still comparable to the Core 2 Duo/Quad series, and the 775 socket has been around for several years. In addition, the only reason you'd need to go to an AM3 board is to boost your RAM performance with DDR3. You never really need to replace a CPU anyway (except when jumping from single/dual core to quad+); very little is actually handled by your CPU. So while Intel is most definitely more expensive, you'll get longer lifespan when it comes to CPUs.
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 10, 2010 6:26:38 PM

False_Dmitry_II said:
Alright, well if you want future upgradability, you need an AMD system. Both current intel boards will be replaced next year.

If you want pure gaming, then you need to spend a higher percentage of it spent on graphics stuff. Really depends on what you really want out of it.


amd is not more future proof, socket am3 will not support the upcoming bulldozers only socket am3+ will however the am3+ boards will be backwards compatible so it will also support the phenomII cpus, so i would stick with the i7 950
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 10, 2010 6:33:03 PM

that 750 corsair wont handle sli 480's
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 10, 2010 7:28:15 PM

boiler1990 said:
You never really need to replace a CPU anyway



What? Yes you do, at some point you will have upgraded the video cards to where your CPU is hindering performance.
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 11, 2010 3:15:32 PM

Hence the parenthetical after that : "except when jumping from single/dual core to quad+."

With the i7-950, he won't need to upgrade for a long time.
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 11, 2010 3:24:15 PM

i agree, the i7 950 should last him a while, his original build was good, all i would change in the original build is the hdd to a samsung spinpoint f3, its cheaper and slightly slower but its the best hdd price vs performance, he can stick with the caviar black if hes getting it for a good price, and i would change the psu to prepare for sli a good 850 watt or a 1000 watt(rather go for a 1000 watt just to be on the safe side) will be good enough to sli 2 480s, thats all i would change, by the way what case are you getting?
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 11, 2010 3:30:45 PM

and why are you arguing amd is definitely not the way to go on this budget, it is NOT more future proof as you wont be able to upgrade the cpu to a bulldozer or so on and the i7 950 outperforms every amd cpu that is out on the market at the moment....
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 12, 2010 1:08:45 AM

No, most games still like fast dual cores. We aren't to the core-count-is-best yet, software isn't there.

Before dual cpus you would need to replace for a faster single core. My 4600+ x2 was hidering even my HD 4850. If I were to have "upgraded" to a phenom one quad core it would have been slower per core and hurting performance more. This would have hurt more.

The entire statement, including the parenthetical after that, is patently insane.

I was just saying what an AMD system could do for much cheaper, even if it isn't any more future proof (no such thing, but there is trying for a bit longer before obsoleteness takes hold). This is my budget != this is what I must spend, it's what I can. That and informing of intels plans. It's obviously his choice I'm just telling him other possible options.
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September 13, 2010 4:47:40 AM

I am getting the haf x case. I already ordered the parts, including the 750w psu. I don't know when or if ill be going sli in the future, but i'm wondering if I made a bit of a mistake by not going higher. I did go for the spinpoint f3 as the reviews made mention that it was extremely quiet, etc. I can always add a black caviar later if I want. I will probably stick with what I have, and use the 750 on a second machine and get a higher psu later if I go sli. I also went with patriot ram as suggested.
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September 13, 2010 4:51:16 AM

Simple question. When I am working on my motherboard, what should i set it on, or does it matter? Can I set it on the table, should I set it on a static free mat, any suggestions? I will be grounded.
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 13, 2010 2:15:11 PM

Eh, as long as the table isn't made of shaggy carpets you should pretty much be fine. Personally I've not actually seen an antistatic wrist strap before, and I've messed with/ built alot of comps.
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a b B Homebuilt system
September 14, 2010 12:23:08 AM

dadoffive said:
Simple question. When I am working on my motherboard, what should i set it on, or does it matter? Can I set it on the table, should I set it on a static free mat, any suggestions? I will be grounded.


All that really matters is that you ground yourself (discharge any static) on the case or something metal that is NOT your motherboard ;)  I've messed with my computer on a carpet floor, but I always make sure to touch the steel plating of my case if I'm shuffling around a lot.
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