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Digital Rebel & Sunpak Flash Issues

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Anonymous
January 3, 2005 7:07:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I just got a Canon Digital Rebel. Previously I had a Canon EOS Elan
film SLR, and the flash I've used with it is a Sunpak Power Zoom 4000AF
which has always worked fine with my Elan, and worked fine just this
minute when I tried it.

However, when I attach it to my Digital Rebel, it doesn't seem to work -
the flash seems to identify the lens focal length (it changes as I
change the zoom on the lens), but when I look to take my picture, the
Rebel beeps and blinks the lightning-bolt icon as if to say "I need a
flash!" but is not otherwise recognizing the external flash or using it
- it just takes the photo (or wants to) as if the flash wasn't even there.

Is the Rebel simply not compatible with certain types of external flash
units? Can someone fill me in on what might be going on?

Thanks!
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 7:07:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Chris Kotchey" <ckotchey@stny.rr.com> wrote in message
news:vy3Cd.104975$Uf.101508@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
>I just got a Canon Digital Rebel. Previously I had a Canon EOS Elan film
>SLR, and the flash I've used with it is a Sunpak Power Zoom 4000AF which
>has always worked fine with my Elan, and worked fine just this minute when
>I tried it.
>
> However, when I attach it to my Digital Rebel, it doesn't seem to work -
> the flash seems to identify the lens focal length (it changes as I change
> the zoom on the lens), but when I look to take my picture, the Rebel beeps
> and blinks the lightning-bolt icon as if to say "I need a flash!" but is
> not otherwise recognizing the external flash or using it - it just takes
> the photo (or wants to) as if the flash wasn't even there.
>
> Is the Rebel simply not compatible with certain types of external flash
> units? Can someone fill me in on what might be going on?
>
> Thanks!

Canon digital cameras, at least the recent ones like the RebelD and 20D, are
not compatible with older flashes, except the EX series of Canon flashes.
In fact, they don't work with a number of currently produced, but older
design, independent flashes, like some of the Sunpaks and Vivitars.
Sounds like this is the case with yours.

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 7:07:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Chris Kotchey wrote:
> I just got a Canon Digital Rebel. Previously I had a Canon EOS Elan
> film SLR, and the flash I've used with it is a Sunpak Power Zoom
4000AF
> which has always worked fine with my Elan, and worked fine just this
> minute when I tried it.
>
> However, when I attach it to my Digital Rebel, it doesn't seem to
work -
> the flash seems to identify the lens focal length (it changes as I
> change the zoom on the lens), but when I look to take my picture, the

> Rebel beeps and blinks the lightning-bolt icon as if to say "I need a

> flash!" but is not otherwise recognizing the external flash or using
it
> - it just takes the photo (or wants to) as if the flash wasn't even
there.
>
> Is the Rebel simply not compatible with certain types of external
flash
> units? Can someone fill me in on what might be going on?

Check the flash's shoe voltage. If its more than 6v then check if the
dRebel works anymore ;-)

- Siddhartha
Related resources
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 11:44:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Chris Kotchey" <ckotchey@stny.rr.com> wrote in message
news:vy3Cd.104975$Uf.101508@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
>I just got a Canon Digital Rebel. Previously I had a Canon EOS Elan film
>SLR, and the flash I've used with it is a Sunpak Power Zoom 4000AF which
>has always worked fine with my Elan, and worked fine just this minute when
>I tried it.
>
> However, when I attach it to my Digital Rebel, it doesn't seem to work -
> the flash seems to identify the lens focal length (it changes as I change
> the zoom on the lens), but when I look to take my picture, the Rebel beeps
> and blinks the lightning-bolt icon as if to say "I need a flash!" but is
> not otherwise recognizing the external flash or using it - it just takes
> the photo (or wants to) as if the flash wasn't even there.
>
> Is the Rebel simply not compatible with certain types of external flash
> units? Can someone fill me in on what might be going on?
>
> Thanks!


Canon Digital cameras require flash that's compatible with E-TTL, which is
their flash exposure system for digital. I believe the Sunpak you have is
only compatible with TTL, which is only for film.

Mark
January 3, 2005 12:18:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <uaidneAGqOXP0UTcRVn-sw@comcast.com>, mbohntrash54@comcast.net
says...
> "Chris Kotchey" <ckotchey@stny.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:vy3Cd.104975$Uf.101508@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
> >I just got a Canon Digital Rebel. Previously I had a Canon EOS Elan film
> >SLR, and the flash I've used with it is a Sunpak Power Zoom 4000AF which
> >has always worked fine with my Elan, and worked fine just this minute when
> >I tried it.
> >
> > However, when I attach it to my Digital Rebel, it doesn't seem to work -
> > the flash seems to identify the lens focal length (it changes as I change
> > the zoom on the lens), but when I look to take my picture, the Rebel beeps
> > and blinks the lightning-bolt icon as if to say "I need a flash!" but is
> > not otherwise recognizing the external flash or using it - it just takes
> > the photo (or wants to) as if the flash wasn't even there.
> >
> > Is the Rebel simply not compatible with certain types of external flash
> > units? Can someone fill me in on what might be going on?
> >
> > Thanks!
>
>
> Canon Digital cameras require flash that's compatible with E-TTL, which is
> their flash exposure system for digital. I believe the Sunpak you have is
> only compatible with TTL, which is only for film.
>
> Mark
>
>
>


If it flashes at the right time, its "compatible".. Just not "Automatic".

If you learn to use the cameras manual settings, you can save LOTs OF MONEY,
on flash units.

If you are shooting fast moving sports type shots, you may need to buy a new
flash, but for "static" or "posed" shots a manual flash should work well,
once you work out the proper settings for the camera..

"Over-exposed": use faster shutter or smaller arpeture (or both).


--
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 3:43:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 04:07:55 +0000, Chris Kotchey wrote:

> I just got a Canon Digital Rebel. Previously I had a Canon EOS Elan
> film SLR, and the flash I've used with it is a Sunpak Power Zoom 4000AF
> which has always worked fine with my Elan, and worked fine just this
> minute when I tried it.
>
> However, when I attach it to my Digital Rebel, it doesn't seem to work -
> the flash seems to identify the lens focal length (it changes as I
> change the zoom on the lens), but when I look to take my picture, the
> Rebel beeps and blinks the lightning-bolt icon as if to say "I need a
> flash!" but is not otherwise recognizing the external flash or using it
> - it just takes the photo (or wants to) as if the flash wasn't even
> there.
>
> Is the Rebel simply not compatible with certain types of external flash
> units? Can someone fill me in on what might be going on?
>
I had the same problem with a Jessop badged flashgun which I used with
Canon EOS300. It works on 300D but as if set in the manual mode, mostly
overexposing evreything. Canon helpdesk told me that none of the
independent falshguns compatible with non-digital Canon cameras are
compatible with its digital models.

Well, I guess, they will tell that to sell me a Canon flashgun :-). But it
is probably true.

--

Gautam Majumdar

Please send e-mails to gmajumdar@freeuk.com
January 5, 2005 1:10:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Larry <lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet> wrote in
news:MPG.1c431e23cdb3929d9898a4@news.comcast.giganews.com:


> If you learn to use the cameras manual settings, you can save LOTs OF
> MONEY, on flash units.
>
> If you are shooting fast moving sports type shots, you may need to buy
> a new flash, but for "static" or "posed" shots a manual flash should
> work well, once you work out the proper settings for the camera..

I never had much luck working out the proper settings for bounce flash in
manual mode...

Do all these new TTL methods have any actual advantages, or is it just a
way to sell more brand name flash units?

Bob

--
Delete the inverse SPAM to reply
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 1:58:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 04 Jan 2005 in rec.photo.digital, bob wrote:

> Do all these new TTL methods have any actual advantages, or is it
> just a way to sell more brand name flash units?

I just got a Nikon D70 and a Nikon SB600 flash. I haven't had a lot of
time to explore all the modes (and I think there's about a dozen of
them), but the TTL-BL (Through The Lens - Balanced Light?) mode is
awesome. It gives perfectly balanced fill flash. For my money, the
dedicated flash is worth it.

--
Joe Makowiec
http://makowiec.org/
Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 11:08:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>I never had much luck working out the proper settings for bounce flash in
>manual mode...

I've had great luck. I set the camera to f/8, set the sunpack flash
to auto mode at f/8, and bounce the flash of the ceiling. The
exposures are perfect.

-Joel

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Anonymous
January 7, 2005 1:01:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Dr. Joel M. Hoffman" <joel@exc.com> wrote in message
news:9VgDd.3929$KR1.501@fe11.lga...
> >I never had much luck working out the proper settings for bounce flash in
> >manual mode...
>
> I've had great luck. I set the camera to f/8, set the sunpack flash
> to auto mode at f/8, and bounce the flash of the ceiling. The
> exposures are perfect.
>
> -Joel

Any chance of a look?

Steven.
January 7, 2005 1:10:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

joel@exc.com (Dr. Joel M. Hoffman) wrote in
news:9VgDd.3929$KR1.501@fe11.lga:

>>I never had much luck working out the proper settings for bounce flash
>>in manual mode...
>
> I've had great luck. I set the camera to f/8, set the sunpack flash
> to auto mode at f/8, and bounce the flash of the ceiling. The
> exposures are perfect.

But auto mode isn't manual mode! In auto mode, there are no setting to work
out...

Bob
Anonymous
January 9, 2005 6:38:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Chris Kotchey <ckotchey@stny.rr.com> writes:

> I just got a Canon Digital Rebel. Previously I had a Canon EOS Elan
> film SLR, and the flash I've used with it is a Sunpak Power Zoom
> 4000AF which has always worked fine with my Elan, and worked fine just
> this minute when I tried it.
>
> However, when I attach it to my Digital Rebel, it doesn't seem to
> work

I'm late to the party here, but what you've learned is that the EZ
flash system used by the Elan is not the same as the EX system used by
the newer Canons.

Imagine how bummed I was when my Canon 540EZ didn't work on my Canon
G2 digicam (and obviously the Digi Rebel too). I grabbed a 550EX and
all was well.

Best Regards,
--
Todd H.
http://www.toddh.net/
Anonymous
January 10, 2005 12:11:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>>>I never had much luck working out the proper settings for bounce flash
>>>in manual mode...
>>
>> I've had great luck. I set the camera to f/8, set the sunpack flash
>> to auto mode at f/8, and bounce the flash of the ceiling. The
>> exposures are perfect.
>
>But auto mode isn't manual mode! In auto mode, there are no setting to work
>out...

I thought you meant manual mode on the camera. I use manual settings
on the camera, and the electric eye on the flash.

-Joel

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Please feed the 35mm lens/digicam databases: http://www.exc.com/photography
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
January 11, 2005 6:41:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Todd H. wrote:
> Chris Kotchey <ckotchey@stny.rr.com> writes:
>
> > I just got a Canon Digital Rebel. Previously I had a Canon EOS
Elan
> > film SLR, and the flash I've used with it is a Sunpak Power Zoom
> > 4000AF which has always worked fine with my Elan, and worked fine
just
> > this minute when I tried it.
> >
> > However, when I attach it to my Digital Rebel, it doesn't seem to
> > work
>
> I'm late to the party here, but what you've learned is that the EZ
> flash system used by the Elan is not the same as the EX system used
by
> the newer Canons.
>
> Imagine how bummed I was when my Canon 540EZ didn't work on my Canon
> G2 digicam (and obviously the Digi Rebel too). I grabbed a 550EX
and
> all was well.
>
> Best Regards,
> --
> Todd H.
> http://www.toddh.net/

I also had an older Canon flash 430 EZ, and was disappointed that I
couldn't use it. I did read an article by Will Crocket, ( a Pro in the
Chicago area, that goes out and does seminars all over the country,)
and he listed the 5 best flashes. His # 5 slot was a Promaster 7500DX,
(which he rated right up there with the Canon EX 550 or 540 and can't
remember which,) which is E-ttl compatable with the Digital Rebel and
sells for about $250. I purchased it thru Precision Camera in Texas.
They were the cheapest. Make sure you order the Canon model not the
Nikon model. It has worked fine for me. I don't use it a lot. I use
a 45 degree diffuser with the flash aimed straight up. I am using the
Hack and can set a + or - power variation. This flash can be used as a
slave also. BTW it also has auto flash zoom built in for zoom lenses -
one heck'va deal for the price!!!
hope this helps.
steinr98
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 11:58:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<steinr98@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1105486880.132188.171660@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
> I also had an older Canon flash 430 EZ, and was disappointed that I
> couldn't use it. I did read an article by Will Crocket, ( a Pro in the
> Chicago area, that goes out and does seminars all over the country,)
> and he listed the 5 best flashes. His # 5 slot was a Promaster 7500DX,
> (which he rated right up there with the Canon EX 550 or 540 and can't
> remember which,) which is E-ttl compatable with the Digital Rebel and
> sells for about $250. I purchased it thru Precision Camera in Texas.
> They were the cheapest. Make sure you order the Canon model not the
> Nikon model. It has worked fine for me. I don't use it a lot. I use
> a 45 degree diffuser with the flash aimed straight up. I am using the
> Hack and can set a + or - power variation. This flash can be used as a
> slave also. BTW it also has auto flash zoom built in for zoom lenses -
> one heck'va deal for the price!!!
> hope this helps.
> steinr98
>

For about the same price, the Sigma EF500 DG Super has a higher guide# (165
vs. 138) and is compatible with E-TTL & E-TTL II (such as on the 20D). I've
been happy with their 1st gen. version (non-DG), on my D30 & 10D.

Mark
January 13, 2005 11:04:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

joel@exc.com (Dr. Joel M. Hoffman) wrote in news:g6hEd.5338$Kh.1613
@fe11.lga:

> I thought you meant manual mode on the camera. I use manual settings
> on the camera, and the electric eye on the flash.
>

Auto mode on the flash works out pretty well, except in the case where the
subject is isolated and represents a *small part* of the frame. Like a
person standing in a field at night. In that kind of situation, auto flash
will always blow out the subject, and one would need to set the aperature
to a larger number than indicated by the auto range.

Bob
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 5:52:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>Auto mode on the flash works out pretty well, except in the case where the
>subject is isolated and represents a *small part* of the frame. Like a
>person standing in a field at night. In that kind of situation, auto flash
>will always blow out the subject, and one would need to set the aperature
>to a larger number than indicated by the auto range.

Or just go to manual mode. But at least with a digital camera, you
can check the exposure to see if you got it right.

-Joel

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