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[Prebuilt] How much is it worth?

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September 12, 2010 5:35:36 AM

A friend is selling his computer and asked me if I wanted to buy It. This is the message he sent me with all the components listed.

Motherboard: Gigabyte S-series G31M-ES2l (I also have an ASUS P5Q available - this could be useful but would take a few weeks to get replaced under warranty. You could make this computer AMAZING if you used this motherboard, bought another 4870, which goes for around 200 bucks these days I think, and crossfired them).
Graphics: (GeCube) ATi Radeon HD 4870 512mb GDDR5
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo E8500 3.16GHz
HD: 465GB 7200rpm (not sure what brand, cbf pulling my computer out lol - those specs should be all you need)
PSU: 750W power supply (same again with the brand)
RAM: Corsair 2GB 2x 1GB DDR2 1066MHz (doesn't sound like a lot, but if you know your computers, you don't need more)
Case: Antec 900 <http://www.digitgeek.com/antec-900/&gt;


He Is asking $600 Australian for it and $630 with the P5Q.

Do you think he is asking the right price and is it an overall good computer?

More about : prebuilt worth

September 12, 2010 5:56:19 AM

It's an ok setup. I certainly don't think it's worth $600. I know computer components can be more expensive in Australia, but in the US (and on ebay in general) that would be worth around $400 (just adding up what each component goes for).

You can check yourself. Just go to ebay, search for each component, and select used and completed listings on the left (you may need to set up an ebay account, but you don't need to give them any personal information).

I checked on the Australian ebay. Those components would sell for around $450 Australian depending upon how well used they are and what brand the power supply is. I definitely wouldn't pay more than $450 for them, though. For $600 you should be able to put together a better system with new components.
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September 12, 2010 6:22:03 AM

If you purchase all the components new from new egg, US$ 640, so you should get some discount for it being used. $630 sounds high, because you won't have the warranty, capacitors age on the power supply and all this is older technology. How old is the machine?

$630 AUD is about $580 US, but that does not mean much, because there is no telling the prices of comuter components locally. Is there an Aussy site equivilant to Newegg you could use to compare?

If you go with this purchase, then definitely upgrade to the Asus mobo, because 2GB of memory may be all you need at the moment, but when you want to upgrade, the ASUS board has two extra slots, so you can add to the existing rather than replace it.
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September 12, 2010 6:34:25 AM

One note if you try to price the components locally. The E8500 is overvalued, because it is valued as an upgrade component for older systems (Old LGA 775 Desktops). Its performance is worse all around than that of an Athlon X4 620 or Core i3-530.
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September 13, 2010 6:18:59 AM

I'm not sure how old it is but i know he build it. I don't want a top of the line computer, I just want something that will be able to play smaller games like Alien Swarm on steam and Gunz online. Do you think this will be sufficient? and if i were to upgrade the CPU what should i look at?
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September 13, 2010 10:15:53 PM

Sorry, Kazel, we have been confuisng you somewhat. I just checked an Australian site for parts and it appears to be much much more expenisve than in the US. I tried to price the computer you are looking at and it was over $900 before the motherboard. 2GB of memory looks like the norm for lower end, prebuilt machines. It is just a different market in Australia.

Yes, I am beginning to think this is a fair deal. It should play your light games fine. Just make sure Windows OS is included. Also, I would get the ASUS motherboard to be able to add 2 x 1GB RAM at a later date. Putting another 4870 graphics card in crossfire is another good future update.
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September 13, 2010 11:11:35 PM

eloric said:
Sorry, Kazel, we have been confuisng you somewhat. I just checked an Australian site for parts and it appears to be much much more expenisve than in the US. I tried to price the computer you are looking at and it was over $900 before the motherboard. 2GB of memory looks like the norm for lower end, prebuilt machines. It is just a different market in Australia.

Yes, I am beginning to think this is a fair deal. It should play your light games fine. Just make sure Windows OS is included. Also, I would get the ASUS motherboard to be able to add 2 x 1GB RAM at a later date. Putting another 4870 graphics card in crossfire is another good future update.


Look at Australian ebay, though. $450 is about right for those components, used.

On Mwave.com.au you can put together a comparable system for around ~$600 (with a better Athlon X4 640 & Radeon HD 5770). If you want the Antec 900, $650 maybe. The prebuilt systems may be a much worse value, but the components aren't that much more expensive.
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September 16, 2010 8:32:49 AM

Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh So confused :( 
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September 16, 2010 7:13:44 PM

Hi Kazel,

Did you look on Australian ebay or in the sites wielander is suggesting? He is saying that I am wrong, and you can do better than what your friend is asking.

So, if you were to go to those sites and do a little research, you could take those results to your firend and make a counteroffer for a lower price.

That might work.

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September 16, 2010 10:46:50 PM

eloric said:
Hi Kazel,

Did you look on Australian ebay or in the sites wielander is suggesting? He is saying that I am wrong, and you can do better than what your friend is asking.

So, if you were to go to those sites and do a little research, you could take those results to your firend and make a counteroffer for a lower price.

That might work.


I'm sorry; I wasn't trying to say that you were wrong eloric.

I'll try to explain it for Kazel:

1. Some computer components depreciate (decrease in value) considerably one they become "used." A used hard drive for instance is worth much less than a new one because hard drives have a limited lifespan and degrade in performance as they age. Your friend's computer would likely sell for around $450 if it was sold at auction on ebay because it is used.

2. A new prebuilt computer comparable in performance to your friend's one would cost quite a bit more than $600. Computer companies charge a considerable amount to assemble, test, and warranty a new computer.

3. You could build a new higher performance computer than your friend's for around $600 (More powerful Athlon X4 630, comparable but newer and better featured Radeon HD 5770, 400W 80+ power supply, 2GB DDR3 1333, 500GB hard drive, Antec 300 case, AM3 mATX motherboard). You can always save quite a bit of money by building a computer yourself instead of buying a prebuilt one.

4. Your friend's computer uses an older, last generation motherboard, processor, and memory. Even very low level new processors are faster than the E8500. You wouldn't be able to use a current generation processor in this computer without at least a new motherboard.

5. You could upgrade the processor without changing the motherboard, but it wouldn't be worth it. Core 2 Quad processors are a very bad value now; they cost about twice as much as current generation processors of the same performance.

6. For the price of a decent Core 2 Quad processor (Q9505 - ~$280) you could get a higher performance new AMD Phenom processor (Phenom II 945 - ~$200) and a compatible motherboard (~$60). For the cost of your friend's computer and that Core 2 Quad (~$880) you could get a much much more powerful computer if you built it yourself (Higher performance Phenom II 945, 4GB DDR3 1333, 500GB HDD, Silverstone 500W 80+ power supply, Gigabyte AM3 mATX motherboard, much more powerful Radeon HD 5850, Antec 300 case).

7. I don't like the idea of buying a computer from a friend. Even if you know your friend has taken really good care of it and isn't trying to cheat you or anything, it's risky. If anything goes wrong (a part fails, the disk becomes corrupted), do you blame your friend or just swallow your loss.
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September 17, 2010 5:55:07 AM

Thank you both so much for your help!

I have decided not to buy the computer from my friend, i agree with the points Wielander made.

I am going to look into building a PC, it sounds like a better way to go and it is brand new so no wear and tear.

Should i just buy the P5Q off him or should i get a AMD motherboard like you said?
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September 17, 2010 6:33:35 AM

Kazel said:
Thank you both so much for your help!

I have decided not to buy the computer from my friend, i agree with the points Wielander made.

I am going to look into building a PC, it sounds like a better way to go and it is brand new so no wear and tear.

Should i just buy the P5Q off him or should i get a AMD motherboard like you said?


I wouldn't buy the P5Q because it is another LGA775 motherboard. You would have to use the overpriced Core 2 Duo or Quad processors with it.

Right now AMD builds are the best value for gaming. You can get a cheap mATX AM3 motherboard for less than $80.

http://www.mwave.com.au/category.asp?ST=Basic&CartID=mA...

ASRock Motherboard w/USB 3.0
http://www.mwave.com.au/productdetail.asp?CartID=mAU@FF...


If you want a larger motherboard like that P5Q so that you can add a second graphics card later (buy an AMD chipset motherboard for crossfiring ATI graphics cards or a nForce chipset for running Nvidia Graphics cards in SLI), it will cost you around $150.

ASRock Motherboard w/Dual PCI-E x16 slots & USB 3.0
http://www.mwave.com.au/productdetail.asp?CartID=mAU@FF...
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September 19, 2010 12:59:55 AM

Kazel said:
Ok this is what I put together. what do you think?

http://www.mwave.com.au/shoppingcart.asp?CartID=mAU@78N...

\hope the link works

Yeah, that link isn't going to work. The list of items stored in your shopping cart is only saved for the shopping session on your computer; it won't show up on mine.
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September 19, 2010 1:02:21 AM

Best answer selected by Kazel.
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September 19, 2010 1:04:23 AM

Sorry.

Motherboard: ASRock 880GMH-LE

CPU: AMD Athlon II X4 Quad Core 640

HDD: Western Digital Caviar Green WD5000AADS

RAM: PQI 2GB (1x 2GB) Single Channel Memory - PC3 10666 (1333Mhz) DDR3 - 240-pin

video card: PowerColor Radeon HD 5550

DVD drive: Samsung SH-S222A

Power Supply: Aywun MEGA POWER 450W ATX Power Supply, 80PLUS

CPU fan: Aywun RADI A1-V6-LP (Version 2)

Case: Antec Three Hundred


Total cost AU$599.35
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September 19, 2010 2:52:52 AM

Kazel said:
RAM: PQI 2GB (1x 2GB) Single Channel Memory - PC3 10666 (1333Mhz) DDR3 - 240-pin

Consider dual channel memory. Memory performs better if it is run in parallel.

http://www.mwave.com.au/productdetail.asp?CartID=mAU@KN...

Kazel said:
video card: PowerColor Radeon HD 5550

You will want a better graphics card for a gaming system, at least a Radeon HD5770.

http://www.mwave.com.au/productdetail.asp?CartID=mAU@KN...

Kazel said:
DVD drive: Samsung SH-S222A

This is an IDE drive. You want a SATA one. There are a couple for $24, but there is limited stock:

http://www.mwave.com.au/productdetail.asp?CartID=mAU@KN...

http://www.mwave.com.au/productdetail.asp?CartID=mAU@KN...

Kazel said:
CPU fan: Aywun RADI A1-V6-LP (Version 2)

The processor comes with a CPU fan; you don't need to buy an aftermarket one unless you want to overclock. If you really do want to overclock, I would go with a well reviewed heatpipe tower cooler with a 120mm fan that is guaranteed to perform better than the stock cooler. Something like this:

http://www.mwave.com.au/productdetail.asp?CartID=mAU@KN...
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September 19, 2010 4:47:04 AM

Ok this is what i have changed. I don't want to overclock yet so i will stick to the supplied one for now, I also want to add a ASUS PCI-G31 IEEE 802.11b/g PCI Wireless Adapter.

Do you think 2 x 1gb of ram is enough or should i upgrade to 2 x 2gb sticks?

and is the processor sufficient?



Motherboard: ASRock 880GMH-LE

CPU: AMD Athlon II X4 Quad Core 640

HDD: Western Digital Caviar Green WD5000AADS

RAM: Kingston ValueRAM 2GB Memory 2x 1GB

video card: Sapphire Radeon HD 5770 Video Card, 1024MB

DVD drive: Samsung SH-S223C

Power Supply: Aywun MEGA POWER 450W ATX Power Supply, 80PLUS

WiFi: ASUS PCI-G31 IEEE 802.11b/g PCI Wireless Adapter

Case: Antec Three Hundred
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September 19, 2010 9:48:40 AM

Ram is a lot cheaper in the states (a 4GB kit costs only about $20-30 more), and that's why we always put 4GB in builds. I think you could definitely get by with 2GB of ram; most programs don't use very much ram (general computing, productivity, gaming). You can always add a couple more sticks later if you ever find that you need it (DDR3 is going to continue to get cheaper over time).

That processor is quite capable. In gaming it will outperform the Radeon HD 5770; it would match up pretty well with a pair of them, actually.
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September 20, 2010 6:38:14 AM

Thanks for your help, i'm a massive noob when it comes to all this computer stuff but i am learning alot.

is there a difference between the makes of grafics cards, e.g Sapphire Radeon HD 5770 and HIS Radeon HD 5770
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September 20, 2010 8:11:35 AM

Kazel said:
Thanks for your help, i'm a massive noob when it comes to all this computer stuff but i am learning alot.

is there a difference between the makes of grafics cards, e.g Sapphire Radeon HD 5770 and HIS Radeon HD 5770


I'm happy to help. :D 

Some graphics card brands are more highly regarded than others. Sapphire, for example, has been the premier partner of ATI for many years and makes very reliable cards. Gigabyte, MSI, and XFX also make very high quality boards. HIS has been around for few years, but their cards aren't as popular; I generally trust them, though. Powercolor, Diamond, and Visiontek are some of the lower end brands that I'm wary of.

It doesn't make much of a difference if you are just buying a card built on the reference design. ATI makes reference, example cards that its partners build off of. The first graphics cards of a new series that come out are usually just like the reference design (same PCB layout and cooler). This is a reference HD 5770:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/2856/2

Later on custom cards are released with unique coolers, custom board layouts, and other features. It's best to review these cards based on actual reviews. You can try just searching on Google. You can also use newegg.com to look at reviews from actual consumers. Even though you can't buy from them, they have a massive collection of user reviews.
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September 22, 2010 11:08:48 AM

ok thanks, i will probably go with ether Gigabyte or Power color because my local computer shop doesn't stock Sapphire and i prefer to go with them because they are on average $10 cheaper on all items.


Another question, with ram can you put 1 1gb stick and another 2gb stick? :) 
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September 22, 2010 7:28:24 PM

Kazel said:
ok thanks, i will probably go with ether Gigabyte or Power color because my local computer shop doesn't stock Sapphire and i prefer to go with them because they are on average $10 cheaper on all items.


Another question, with ram can you put 1 1gb stick and another 2gb stick? :) 

You really want to use matched memory sticks if you can (same brand, model, speed, and size). It should work, but it isn't a sure thing.
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September 23, 2010 5:59:43 AM

Ok thanks thats all the questions i have left, thanks for all the help and advice you gave me.

this is the finished product based on price and what is avalable.



Motherboard: ASRock 880GMH-LE

CPU: AMD Athlon II X4 Quad Core 640

HDD: WSeagate Barracuda 7200.12 - Hard drive - 500 GB

RAM: Kingston ValueRAM 2GB Memory 2x 1GB

video card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 5770 Video Card, 1024MB 128-bit GDDR2

DVD drive: Samsung SH-S223C

Power Supply: Cooler Master eXtreme Power Plus 500W Power Supply

Case: Antec Three Hundred
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