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Extended warranty on laptop--worth it?

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December 25, 2004 11:26:15 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
replaced in 3 years.

Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
bet?

Thanks for any comments.

Fred
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 2:38:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I'd get an extended warranty for sure. A new motherboard or LCD can cost
way more than $250. Just make sure that you get accident coverage (dropped
the computer, spilled coffee on the keyboard, etc.)

When I bought my Toshiba from Best Buy, I asked and found out that they
don't stock laptop parts - ten day turnaround at best on any laptop repair
that requires parts. Toshiba has an authorized repair facility nearby, so I
went with the Toshiba three year warranty, which covers one accident per
year, and cost me $220.



"Fred" <fredhanson@att.net> wrote in message
news:1103991975.640241.92690@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
> offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
> that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
> the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
> replaced in 3 years.
>
> Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
> to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
> is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
> bet?
>
> Thanks for any comments.
>
> Fred
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 7:22:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
>offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
>that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
>the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
>replaced in 3 years.
>
>Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
>to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
>is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
>bet?
>
>Thanks for any comments.
>
>Fred

No. Consumer expert Clark Howard says no way and I agree. Most
problems show up right away. It is known that most of the extended
policies payback pennies on the dollar if at all. Put that outragous
extra charge in a cookie jar. After buying a few items you'll have
enough money to pay for your own repairs in the rare case of a problem
showing up late.

Extended warranty problems:
1. Terrible service if any at all. Better to find your own service
place and have it done right. Having morons repair your hardware is
never a plus.
2. In a few years your hardware will be so outdated that the extra
warranty charge will or almost will buy another new item.
3. Repairing outdated hardware is never a bargin no matter how cheap.
4. Loopholes like with Sony where no matter what goes wrong they claim
you're not covered.
5. Simple economics. These policies often give retailers 10 times the
profit they get from selling the actual hardware. If this policy was a
good deal for the consumer they would be making a fraction of that
amount, more inline with their other profit margins.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 7:54:45 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

My first laptop was a Dell Inspiron 8100. I bought the extended warranty
for an extra $120. In the first two years, I had to have the LCD, video
card, and AC adapter replaced. Without the warranty, I would have been out
over a grand to repair a computer that was far from obsolete. And yes, the
service from Dell was horrible.

I don't think the usual "don't buy the extended warranty" consumer advice is
valid for laptops. They get moved, opened, jostled, bumped, closed,
plugged, and unplugged a lot. People (like me) tend to use them while
eating and drinking, which invites an accident. Pets can smack the screens
pretty hard with their tails or noses. I think most people who buy laptops
tend to use them a lot rather than stick them in the closet like a
camcorder.

With a desktop, if you break off the the USB connector or spill coffee on
the keyboard, twenty bucks will usually put you back in business. With a
laptop, it's a new motherboard. A new 19" CRT is $125. A new LCD is $600
or more. Hard drives for laptops cost double. It's harder to repair
laptops, you sometimes have to pay for experienced help.

Laptops break more often, and cost much more to repair. A hundred dollars a
year for an extended warranty makes excellent sense to me.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 8:19:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Fred" <fredhanson@att.net> wrote in news:1103991975.640241.92690
@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:

> I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
> offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
> that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
> the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
> replaced in 3 years.
>
> Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
> to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
> is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
> bet?

I have trouble believing any extended warranty would cover a battery
replacement. I used mine extensively on a daily basis, and it started
losing power after a year, but I didn't replace it until 9 months later
(however, I mostly used AC during that 9 months).

--
Tom McCune
My PGP Page & FAQ: http://www.McCune.cc/PGP.htm
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 8:19:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I don't know about the warranty in question here, but the extended
warranty on a Radio Shack ("You've got questions? We've got blank
stares.") cordless phone covered batteries.

Perce


On 12/25/04 12:19 pm Tom McCune tossed the following ingredients into
the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

> I have trouble believing any extended warranty would cover a battery
> replacement. I used mine extensively on a daily basis, and it started
> losing power after a year, but I didn't replace it until 9 months later
> (however, I mostly used AC during that 9 months).
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 8:19:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Tom McCune wrote:

>"Fred" <fredhanson@att.net> wrote in news:1103991975.640241.92690
>@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:
>
>
>
>>I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
>>offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
>>that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
>>the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
>>replaced in 3 years.
>>
>>Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
>>to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
>>is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
>>bet?
>>
>>
>
>I have trouble believing any extended warranty would cover a battery
>replacement. I used mine extensively on a daily basis, and it started
>losing power after a year, but I didn't replace it until 9 months later
>(however, I mostly used AC during that 9 months).
>
>
>
My batteries are two years old and are beginning to show their age.
Expect I'll have to replace them within 6 months.

I bought Dell's complete care warranty which covers any failure to the
system (even if I drop it, etc.). But the warranty on the batteries is
one year.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 8:28:10 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Generally, extended warranties are not worth it.

However, laptops are one of the exceptions where such a warranty can be
worthwhile.

Personally, I don't buy extended warranties on laptops unless they
either cover accidental screen breakage (note, not failure, but actual
physical breakage -- e.g. you dropped the laptop) or, possibly, the battery.

In general, extended warranties with accidental damage coverage are
available only from the manufacturers (Toshiba and Dell offer them), and
not from the retailers. In general, the extended warranties offered by
the manufacturers are far superior to those offered by the retailers.

Now, as to the battery:

The battery life depends on how you use the laptop. If well cared for
and not abused, a Lithium battery can last 7 to 10 years. However, such
batteries have a limited number of charge cycles, typically in the range
of 300. Calendar time not withstanding, that is one of the "limits" on
the life of such batteries.

Also, as has been discussed here over and over (thousands and thousands
of posts), in most laptops, if you leave the battery in the laptop
continuously when you are running on AC power, you will probably pretty
much destroy the battery in 6 to 24 months. The culprit here isn't
clear, but it's not "shelf life". Perhaps it's overcharging, perhaps
heat, and by no means is this universally true, but it's the experience
of the majority of users that this is the likely outcome of leaving the
battery in a laptop that is almost constantly connencted to AC power
lines. Some argue that it's worth sacrificing the battery this way
because you get "UPS" power supply backup, however if you feel that you
need or want a UPS, a 350VA UPS costs 80% to 90% less than lithium
battery (and will run the laptop for a lot longer).


Fred wrote:

> I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
> offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
> that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
> the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
> replaced in 3 years.
>
> Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
> to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
> is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
> bet?
>
> Thanks for any comments.
>
> Fred
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 8:28:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:

> Generally, extended warranties are not worth it.
>
> However, laptops are one of the exceptions where such a warranty can
> be worthwhile.
>
> Personally, I don't buy extended warranties on laptops unless they
> either cover accidental screen breakage (note, not failure, but actual
> physical breakage -- e.g. you dropped the laptop) or, possibly, the
> battery.
>
> In general, extended warranties with accidental damage coverage are
> available only from the manufacturers (Toshiba and Dell offer them),
> and not from the retailers. In general, the extended warranties
> offered by the manufacturers are far superior to those offered by the
> retailers.
>
> Now, as to the battery:
>
> The battery life depends on how you use the laptop. If well cared for
> and not abused, a Lithium battery can last 7 to 10 years. However,
> such batteries have a limited number of charge cycles, typically in
> the range of 300. Calendar time not withstanding, that is one of the
> "limits" on the life of such batteries.
>
> Also, as has been discussed here over and over (thousands and
> thousands of posts), in most laptops, if you leave the battery in the
> laptop continuously when you are running on AC power, you will
> probably pretty much destroy the battery in 6 to 24 months. The
> culprit here isn't clear, but it's not "shelf life". Perhaps it's
> overcharging, perhaps heat, and by no means is this universally true,
> but it's the experience of the majority of users that this is the
> likely outcome of leaving the battery in a laptop that is almost
> constantly connencted to AC power lines. Some argue that it's worth
> sacrificing the battery this way because you get "UPS" power supply
> backup, however if you feel that you need or want a UPS, a 350VA UPS
> costs 80% to 90% less than lithium battery (and will run the laptop
> for a lot longer).
>
>
> Fred wrote:
>
>> I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
>> offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
>> that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
>> the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
>> replaced in 3 years.
>>
>> Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
>> to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
>> is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
>> bet?
>>
>> Thanks for any comments.
>>
>> Fred
>>
I've had my batteries for two years (Dell Inspiron). I don't see damage
from keeping the batteries in at all times. The discharge/recharge cycle
does determine the life of the batteries.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 8:28:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

In article <Fbizd.1451$Ov3.669@bignews1.bellsouth.net>,
Jerry Park <NoReply@No.Spam> wrote:


> I've had my batteries for two years (Dell Inspiron). I don't see damage
> from keeping the batteries in at all times. The discharge/recharge cycle
> does determine the life of the batteries.

Just because a battery is in the laptop connected to AC power, doesn't
mean it will charge continuously. Mine will charge the battery, showing
a yellow indicator (on an HP), and then it will turn green. If there's
any interuption of the AC power, even a momentary power bump, the light
will turn yellow for a while, indicating charging, and then back to
green when the battery is full.

--
Larry Weil
Lake Wobegone, NH
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 8:32:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Not only does Best Buy not provide the actual service, but their
warranties don't cover accidental physical damage. And it's accidental
physical damage (your examples are good -- dropping the laptop or
spilling liquid on it) that is the major threat. However, as you
correctly point out, either an out-of-warranty motherboard repair or LCD
repair will cost a LOT more than any extended warranty.

But both the best coverage and the best service come from the extended
warranties sold by the manufacturers themselves, ratjer than the
retailer, in almost every case.

[However, Best Buy's warranty does cover the battery, which is generally
not covered by the manufacturer's warranty, and which can cost about $200]


Michael Rainey wrote:

> I'd get an extended warranty for sure. A new motherboard or LCD can cost
> way more than $250. Just make sure that you get accident coverage (dropped
> the computer, spilled coffee on the keyboard, etc.)
>
> When I bought my Toshiba from Best Buy, I asked and found out that they
> don't stock laptop parts - ten day turnaround at best on any laptop repair
> that requires parts. Toshiba has an authorized repair facility nearby, so I
> went with the Toshiba three year warranty, which covers one accident per
> year, and cost me $220.
>
>
>
> "Fred" <fredhanson@att.net> wrote in message
> news:1103991975.640241.92690@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
>>I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
>>offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
>>that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
>>the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
>>replaced in 3 years.
>>
>>Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
>>to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
>>is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
>>bet?
>>
>>Thanks for any comments.
>>
>>Fred
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 25, 2004 10:11:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>No. Consumer expert Clark Howard says no way and I agree. Most
>problems show up right away.


Did this Howard dude mention anything about laptops? Does he own a
laptop?

I agree with Barry, Laptop is an exception to this rule. Specially if
you travel with it (chances to get dropped, banged) or clutz in the
house (hey, we take care of our stuff, but the significant others....)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 1:37:03 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>Did this Howard dude mention anything about laptops? Does he own a
>laptop?

His only partial exception is cars but he has to look at that on a
case by case basis.

>I agree with Barry, Laptop is an exception to this rule. Specially if
>you travel with it (chances to get dropped, banged) or clutz in the
>house (hey, we take care of our stuff, but the significant others....)

Most things people have mentioned here are not covered under the
extended warranty. The number one notebook repair is a broken back
light. Average repair cost of $300 to $700. Some one had to break it
since they don't break themselves.
So under your warranty in most cases it will say screen not covered or
abuse not covered. Another guy had the nerve to mention water damage.
I would love to see the repair centers face when you tell them you
expect them to cover damage after you spilled liquid on your notebook
keyboard. It's not going to happen.
Almost one in four new notebooks are stolen. Do you think the extended
warranty will help in that case also?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 2:49:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Re: "I have trouble believing any extended warranty would cover a
battery replacement."

Best Buy's extended warranty do indeed cover battery replacment.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 2:49:14 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>Best Buy's extended warranty do indeed cover battery replacment.


Yeah but... they will replace it only if it completely fails? Or they
will replace even if it's just worn?

It's a pretty good deal if they replace, no question asked. I mean
battery is a CONSUMABLE item, like paper, ink. It WILL wear out.

On the other hand, I just bought my Sony replacement battery (new)
from eBay, at less than 1/2 of what Sony wants for it. So......
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 2:49:28 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Michael Rainey" <rainey47@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:3365llF3tngmaU1@individual.net...
>
<<snip>>
>
> I don't think the usual "don't buy the extended warranty" consumer advice
> is
> valid for laptops. They get moved, opened, jostled, bumped, closed,
> plugged, and unplugged a lot. People (like me) tend to use them while
> eating and drinking, which invites an accident. Pets can smack the
> screens
> pretty hard with their tails or noses. I think most people who buy
> laptops
> tend to use them a lot rather than stick them in the closet like a
> camcorder.
>
><<snip>>


Excellent analysis. I've been a Thinkpad user for many years now, and all
of them have died (i.e., needing systemboard or screen replacement) in less
than 3 years. The latest one had its motherboard fried when I spilled water
on the keyboard.

About the battery issue: heavy users can expect to see a significant
decrease in battery life in about a year.

Bill T
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 2:49:29 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Bill T wrote:

>
> "Michael Rainey" <rainey47@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
> news:3365llF3tngmaU1@individual.net...
>>
> <<snip>>
>>
>> I don't think the usual "don't buy the extended warranty" consumer advice
>> is
>> valid for laptops. They get moved, opened, jostled, bumped, closed,
>> plugged, and unplugged a lot. People (like me) tend to use them while
>> eating and drinking, which invites an accident. Pets can smack the
>> screens
>> pretty hard with their tails or noses. I think most people who buy
>> laptops
>> tend to use them a lot rather than stick them in the closet like a
>> camcorder.
>>
>><<snip>>
>
>
> Excellent analysis. I've been a Thinkpad user for many years now, and all
> of them have died (i.e., needing systemboard or screen replacement) in
> less
> than 3 years. The latest one had its motherboard fried when I spilled
> water on the keyboard.
>
> About the battery issue: heavy users can expect to see a significant
> decrease in battery life in about a year.

Read the store's extended warranty very carefully and if there is a
manufacturer's extended read that carefully too and see what, exactly, the
cover. For example the emachines extended warranty in addition to the
usual coverages also will replace a broken screen.
>
> Bill T

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 2:59:07 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Re: "I don't think the usual "don't buy the extended warranty" consumer
advice is valid for laptops."

Even Consumer's Reports agrees with that .... BUT, it depends on exactly
what the extended warranty does and does not cover, and how you use the
laptop.

Best Buy's warranties cover batteries. Toshiba's SystemGuard warranties
cover accidental physical damage (e.g. you drop it). But most extended
warranties (including Toshiba warranties other than the "Systemguard"
warranties -- they sell several) cover NEITHER. So this is a question
that can't be answered with a blanket statement.


Michael Rainey wrote:

> My first laptop was a Dell Inspiron 8100. I bought the extended warranty
> for an extra $120. In the first two years, I had to have the LCD, video
> card, and AC adapter replaced. Without the warranty, I would have been out
> over a grand to repair a computer that was far from obsolete. And yes, the
> service from Dell was horrible.
>
They get moved, opened, jostled, bumped, closed,
> plugged, and unplugged a lot. People (like me) tend to use them while
> eating and drinking, which invites an accident. Pets can smack the screens
> pretty hard with their tails or noses. I think most people who buy laptops
> tend to use them a lot rather than stick them in the closet like a
> camcorder.
>
> With a desktop, if you break off the the USB connector or spill coffee on
> the keyboard, twenty bucks will usually put you back in business. With a
> laptop, it's a new motherboard. A new 19" CRT is $125. A new LCD is $600
> or more. Hard drives for laptops cost double. It's harder to repair
> laptops, you sometimes have to pay for experienced help.
>
> Laptops break more often, and cost much more to repair. A hundred dollars a
> year for an extended warranty makes excellent sense to me.
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 3:06:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Fred" <fredhanson@att.net> wrote in message
news:1103991975.640241.92690@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
> offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
> that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
> the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
> replaced in 3 years.
>
> Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
> to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
> is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
> bet?
>
> Thanks for any comments.
>
> Fred
>

I agree with Barry about getting the extended warranty to cover accidental
damage if you travel very much. I recommend that people that travel a lot
with their laptop consider the warranty as part of the basic cost of
ownership. Stuff happens when you're moving around. Toshiba and Dell are
the only ones that I know that really back up the extended/accidental
warranty. I've had good experiences with both those companies on accidental
damage. If you get the Dell Complete Care warranty, it also seems to send
you into a little more responsive phone tree when you call in.

As far as getting the warranty from the store rather than the manufacturer,
normally, I wouldn't recommend it, normally. However, I did by the Best Buy
warranty on a Sony laptop once, because Sony has such a poor reputation for
service. You're sort of dependent on the manager at your individual store
as for how far they will go on supporting some problems. In my case, it
paid off, because Best Buy replaced a Sony laptop that Sony refused to help
on.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 3:06:21 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Fred <fredhanson@att.net> wrote:
> [ ... ] Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
> to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.)

For general info on batteries, see http://www.batteryuniversity.com .
What I remember from it is that LiIon batteries begin to suffer
slow but inexorable decrepitude the minute they leave the production
line, so even their shelf life is finite. Heat and frequent
discharge cycles (especially heat) shorten the life even more.

--
pa at panix dot com
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 3:08:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Re: "Just because a battery is in the laptop connected to AC power,
doesn't mean it will charge continuously."

Agreed. Yet, it's clear that leaving the battery in a laptop connected
to AC power continuously frequently (if not even usually) does do
damage, and over time does destory the battery. The culprit may be the
charging circuit, heat or something else. And it's certainly not
universal and doesn't happen with every laptop model. But there are far
to many such experiences to deny that this is the case, whatever the cause.

PS - you cannot draw any conclusion whatsoever merely from the lights on
the laptop.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 3:08:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>Yet, it's clear that leaving the battery in a laptop connected
>to AC power continuously frequently (if not even usually) does do
>damage, and over time does destory the battery. The culprit may be the
>charging circuit, heat or something else. And it's certainly not
>universal and doesn't happen with every laptop model.


I'd think even if the charging circuit works perfectly, leaving it in
all the time increases its charge cycle and therefore shorten its
life.

For me thought, practical consideration outweights the wear factor, I
unplug from the AC often enough that I don't want to think about each
time whether it's safe to do so. Just wanna unplug and go.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 3:17:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Re: "LiIon batteries begin to suffer slow but inexorable decrepitude the
minute they leave the production line, so even their shelf life is finite."

That's true of all batteries of all types. But, in fact, Lithium
batteries have by far the longest shelf life of any battery chemical
system -- up to about 10 years. NiMH and NiCad have a FAR shorter life
span.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 3:17:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> writes:
> That's true of all batteries of all types. But, in fact, Lithium
> batteries have by far the longest shelf life of any battery chemical
> system -- up to about 10 years.

You're thinking of non-rechargeable lithium batteries, like photo
batteries. Lithium ion rechargeables are a different story.
December 26, 2004 7:35:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

when I work on a laptop the minimum is 50 dollars an hour plus parts.
to change a hard drive for example takes about 2 hrs. 15 minutes to change
the drive and 1 hour and 45 minutes or so to load the operating system and
drivers. The hard drive cost starts about 75 dollars for a 10 gigabyte and
then up. So just to change a hard drive with me would be about 200 dollars.
I would get the warranty

"Fred" <fredhanson@att.net> wrote in message
news:1103991975.640241.92690@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
> offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
> that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
> the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
> replaced in 3 years.
>
> Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
> to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
> is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
> bet?
>
> Thanks for any comments.
>
> Fred
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 7:55:24 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"AndrewJ" <andrewjbbrREMOVE@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1dcss0pg8uc7238nv181kf5ecbsp8f69gn@4ax.com...
>
>>Did this Howard dude mention anything about laptops? Does he own a
>>laptop?
>
> His only partial exception is cars but he has to look at that on a
> case by case basis.
>
>>I agree with Barry, Laptop is an exception to this rule. Specially if
>>you travel with it (chances to get dropped, banged) or clutz in the
>>house (hey, we take care of our stuff, but the significant others....)
>
> Most things people have mentioned here are not covered under the
> extended warranty. The number one notebook repair is a broken back
> light. Average repair cost of $300 to $700. Some one had to break it
> since they don't break themselves.
> So under your warranty in most cases it will say screen not covered or
> abuse not covered. Another guy had the nerve to mention water damage.
> I would love to see the repair centers face when you tell them you
> expect them to cover damage after you spilled liquid on your notebook
> keyboard. It's not going to happen.
> Almost one in four new notebooks are stolen. Do you think the extended
> warranty will help in that case also?

Check out the Dell Complete Care Warranty. It does cover that stuff.
Toshiba has one, too, although I can't remember the name.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 7:55:25 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>Check out the Dell Complete Care Warranty. It does cover that stuff.
>Toshiba has one, too, although I can't remember the name.


"Care" or "Insurance" maybe a better term for these things. That would
be all right. We buy accident insurance, renter insurance, why not
laptop insurance?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 9:27:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Joe Davis <davisexp@attglobal.net> wrote:

> Check out the Dell Complete Care Warranty. It does cover that stuff.
> Toshiba has one, too, although I can't remember the name.


SystemGuard is the name of the Toshiba accidental damage plan.

Here's an excerpt from the site:

"Why is SystemGuard important coverage to have?

Risk of unexpected accidental damage. Notebooks are subjected daily to the
rough and tumble world of mobile computing. A notebook at home, school or in
the office can still be damaged by spills or by being knocked off a desk.
Protect your investment! One (1) repair or replacement for accidental damage
per calendar year Available for all Toshiba notebooks with a three (3) year
standard warranty

Etc etc. Seems like a pretty good deal to me, for $199.00 the 1 year warranty
the machine comes with is extended to 3, and SystemGuard is added for that 3
year period. Bought SystemGuard today after reading about accidental
damage coverage in this thread. Nex


(Got the actual beast, an M35X S329 a couple of days ago - love it)
December 26, 2004 10:43:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thanks to all for this great, informative discussion. Differences of
opinion have been as informative as the issues you all agree on.

Compaq has a 3-year inclusive warranty for $300 that covers the battery
as well as accidental damage, with a 3-day return (not including
transit time). For quality and coverage this seems the best, right?

Also, I've seen a battery for this computer listed for a $120 internet
price by Circuit City.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 12:48:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>
>> Check out the Dell Complete Care Warranty. It does cover that stuff.
>> Toshiba has one, too, although I can't remember the name.
>
>
>SystemGuard is the name of the Toshiba accidental damage plan.
>
>Here's an excerpt from the site:
>
>"Why is SystemGuard important coverage to have?
>
>Risk of unexpected accidental damage

That's not an extended warranty but an insiurance plan. I never said
not to insure your notebook. In many cases you can put it on your
homeowners with a rider as low as $30 a year. This thread does a huge
disservice to people reading it that now think your basic extended
service plan is an insurance plan. Actually the oppisite is true. If
you can't prove the damage was from a manufacturing defect and not
abuse, they won't fix it.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 2:56:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

All I know is:

I paid Toshiba an extra $220, so that -

If, for three years after the purchase date, my computer stops working
because of a manufacturing defect (unlimited) or because my son whacks it
with a baseball bat (once a year), Toshiba will either fix or replace it for
free. I don't care whether it's an extended warranty or an insurance
policy. What difference does it make?


"AndrewJ" <andrewjbbrREMOVE@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:ldjts0pncpq2f6suf3343eca7u1seq38bl@4ax.com...
>
> >
> >> Check out the Dell Complete Care Warranty. It does cover that stuff.
> >> Toshiba has one, too, although I can't remember the name.
> >
> >
> >SystemGuard is the name of the Toshiba accidental damage plan.
> >
> >Here's an excerpt from the site:
> >
> >"Why is SystemGuard important coverage to have?
> >
> >Risk of unexpected accidental damage
>
> That's not an extended warranty but an insiurance plan. I never said
> not to insure your notebook. In many cases you can put it on your
> homeowners with a rider as low as $30 a year. This thread does a huge
> disservice to people reading it that now think your basic extended
> service plan is an insurance plan. Actually the oppisite is true. If
> you can't prove the damage was from a manufacturing defect and not
> abuse, they won't fix it.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 6:57:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> What difference does it make?

If you don't care what the OP asked about, it doesn't.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 7:47:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

AndrewJ wrote:

>
>>Did this Howard dude mention anything about laptops? Does he own a
>>laptop?
>
> His only partial exception is cars but he has to look at that on a
> case by case basis.
>
>>I agree with Barry, Laptop is an exception to this rule. Specially if
>>you travel with it (chances to get dropped, banged) or clutz in the
>>house (hey, we take care of our stuff, but the significant others....)
>
> Most things people have mentioned here are not covered under the
> extended warranty. The number one notebook repair is a broken back
> light. Average repair cost of $300 to $700. Some one had to break it
> since they don't break themselves.
> So under your warranty in most cases it will say screen not covered or
> abuse not covered.

E-machines, reputed by some to to be the cheapest bottom feeder in the
industry, covers busted screens with their extended warranty. If they do
it then it's reasonable to expect anybody to do it and any company that
doesn't is to be avoided.

> Another guy had the nerve to mention water damage.
> I would love to see the repair centers face when you tell them you
> expect them to cover damage after you spilled liquid on your notebook
> keyboard. It's not going to happen.

Depends on the terms of the warranty.

> Almost one in four new notebooks are stolen. Do you think the extended
> warranty will help in that case also?

Why would one expect it to?

You are assuming that all extended warranties have identical terms and that
you know what those terms are. Neither is the case.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 26, 2004 7:50:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

AndrewJ wrote:

>
>
>> What difference does it make?
>
> If you don't care what the OP asked about, it doesn't.

A point you are missing is that with the manufacturer's contract, regardless
of what name you put on it, there is a single provider. You ship the
laptop to them, it comes back fixed. With an insurance company you have
two involved and one requires forms processing and the like and there is a
delay before they pay, and they may or may not pay the full cost depending
on the terms of the policy. Further, an insurance policy that covers
manufacturing defect is generally no cheaper than the extended warranty.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
December 26, 2004 10:25:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Don't get for the battery as that will not be covered.
Bob


"BigJIm" <Jim10277@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:5crzd.562221$wV.545769@attbi_s54...
> when I work on a laptop the minimum is 50 dollars an hour plus parts.
> to change a hard drive for example takes about 2 hrs. 15 minutes to change
> the drive and 1 hour and 45 minutes or so to load the operating system and
> drivers. The hard drive cost starts about 75 dollars for a 10 gigabyte and
> then up. So just to change a hard drive with me would be about 200
> dollars.
> I would get the warranty
>
> "Fred" <fredhanson@att.net> wrote in message
> news:1103991975.640241.92690@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>>I recently bought a Compaq R3000US laptop. The Best Buy salesman
>> offered a 3-year warranty at $250. His most compelling argument was
>> that a new battery would cost nearly that much ($189 on the web), and
>> the Li-Ion battery in this computer would almost certainly have to be
>> replaced in 3 years.
>>
>> Is this true? Is the use life of these batteries that short? (I expect
>> to use the computer on battery power about 1 to 2 hours a day.) Also,
>> is the trouble-free record bad enough to make the warranty a reasonable
>> bet?
>>
>> Thanks for any comments.
>>
>> Fred
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 27, 2004 10:19:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

No, I'm thinking of both. All lithium based battery systems have very
long shelf lives; I have quite a few Toshiba batteries made in 1997 that
are still nearly 100% capacity to run laptops for 2+ hours.

[I'm not saying that a lithium rechargeable battery will retain a charge
for years, but I am saying that properly cared for, they can last for
many, many years -- the better part of a decade. They do self discharge
(lose their charge), however. But it's still a whole lot slower than
any other rechargeable battery system.]


Paul Rubin wrote:
> Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> writes:
>
>>That's true of all batteries of all types. But, in fact, Lithium
>>batteries have by far the longest shelf life of any battery chemical
>>system -- up to about 10 years.
>
>
> You're thinking of non-rechargeable lithium batteries, like photo
> batteries. Lithium ion rechargeables are a different story.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 27, 2004 10:20:07 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

No, I'm thinking of both. All lithium based battery systems have very
long shelf lives; I have quite a few Toshiba batteries made in 1997 that
are still nearly 100% capacity to run laptops for 2+ hours.

[I'm not saying that a lithium rechargeable battery will retain a charge
for years, but I am saying that properly cared for, they can last for
many, many years -- the better part of a decade. They do self discharge
(lose their charge), however. But it's still a whole lot slower than
any other rechargeable battery system.]


Paul Rubin wrote:
> Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> writes:
>
>>That's true of all batteries of all types. But, in fact, Lithium
>>batteries have by far the longest shelf life of any battery chemical
>>system -- up to about 10 years.
>
>
> You're thinking of non-rechargeable lithium batteries, like photo
> batteries. Lithium ion rechargeables are a different story.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 27, 2004 10:31:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Andrew,

Toshiba and Dell, and a few other mfgrs., specifically offer extended
warranties with "no fault" physical damage coverage. In other words,
you put your fist through the screen in a moment of anger, or drop the
laptop, and it's covered (and you don't even have to hide what happened).



AndrewJ wrote:

>>Did this Howard dude mention anything about laptops? Does he own a
>>laptop?
>
>
> His only partial exception is cars but he has to look at that on a
> case by case basis.
>
>
>>I agree with Barry, Laptop is an exception to this rule. Specially if
>>you travel with it (chances to get dropped, banged) or clutz in the
>>house (hey, we take care of our stuff, but the significant others....)
>
>
> Most things people have mentioned here are not covered under the
> extended warranty. The number one notebook repair is a broken back
> light. Average repair cost of $300 to $700. Some one had to break it
> since they don't break themselves.
> So under your warranty in most cases it will say screen not covered or
> abuse not covered. Another guy had the nerve to mention water damage.
> I would love to see the repair centers face when you tell them you
> expect them to cover damage after you spilled liquid on your notebook
> keyboard. It's not going to happen.
> Almost one in four new notebooks are stolen. Do you think the extended
> warranty will help in that case also?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 27, 2004 10:35:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

It's their "Systemguard" warranty. It's not the only warranty they
sell, so you can't assume this coverage just because you got a Toshiba
extended warranty. But it's reasonably priced, for most of the
Satellite laptops it's $229 to $299 for 3 years.

[There is a limit of one "catastrophic" physical damage incident in any
12-month period]


Joe Davis wrote:


>>Most things people have mentioned here are not covered under the
>>extended warranty.
>
>
> Check out the Dell Complete Care Warranty. It does cover that stuff.
> Toshiba has one, too, although I can't remember the name.
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 27, 2004 11:09:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Re: "what difference does it make?"

Well, in a few states (Florida is one), Toshiba doesn't offer the
"Systemguard" warranty (you CANNOT buy it if your address is in that
state) because the state insurance commissioner has concluded that it is
insurance, and Toshiba is not licensed to do business as an insurance
company, and their sales people are not licensed property and casualty
insurance agents. [This isn't unique to Toshiba, or even computers; in
some states, availability of "extended warranty policies" is limited
because of the way in which those states regulate insurance, and how the
boundaries between "warranties" and "insurance" gets defined by state law].


Michael Rainey wrote:

> All I know is:
>
> I paid Toshiba an extra $220, so that -
>
> If, for three years after the purchase date, my computer stops working
> because of a manufacturing defect (unlimited) or because my son whacks it
> with a baseball bat (once a year), Toshiba will either fix or replace it for
> free. I don't care whether it's an extended warranty or an insurance
> policy. What difference does it make?
>
>
> "AndrewJ" <andrewjbbrREMOVE@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:ldjts0pncpq2f6suf3343eca7u1seq38bl@4ax.com...
>

>>
>>That's not an extended warranty but an insiurance plan. I never said
>>not to insure your notebook.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 28, 2004 2:14:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

If you buy a <$600 notebook (eg. any of the nice sales recently; eg.
Toshiba M35 for $499 at Bestbuy.com Black Friday), then no. As long as
you're careful with it, and run it nice for a year, that notebook will
only be worth $250 in one year (50%+ depreciation on all computer
products for the past 15+ years in general) and/or you can buy a new
laptop for ~$300 or so.

Absolutely no point buying warranty unless you're the type prone to
break and drop things.

On a more expensive notebook (eg. $1k+), you'll be making a longer term
investment, so figure it out from there.

Also, most notebooks are 'obsolete' within 3 years or so, and by then,
you'll have so many new, bloated programs, you'll wish you had a
newer,faster notebook. Unless you're the type not to upgrade, a
warranty is worth considering.
!