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Rosewill PSUs

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December 6, 2010 8:49:34 PM

Hi I ordered Rosewill RV2-700 700W and other stuff (CPU, MOBO, Ram) for a new build from Newegg and it's gonna arrive tomorrow. (Unintelligently, after ordering)I read reviews about this PSU and people are complaining about the build quality of Rosewill PSUs, with a significant amount of case DOA.

My problem now is: is a defective PSU going to "Fry" my system as soon as I assemble the PC and turn the power on? Is there any way to test for potential defect of the PSU?

More about : rosewill psus

a b ) Power supply
December 6, 2010 9:08:29 PM

Usually if a PSU dies it simply dies. If you are unlucky, then it can take out a component (any) with it. If you are extremely unlucky, then your entire system will be fried.

My recommendation is to replace it as soon as you can afford to do so.

Brands that I recommend in order of my preference is as follows:

1. Seasonic - Premier PSU manufacturer
2. XFX - All PSUs are manufactured by Seasonic
3. Corsair - Their PSUs are manufactured by CWT and Seasonic
4. PC Power & Cooling - Some PSUs are manufactured by Seasonic.
5. Enermax
6. Antec - A few PSUs are manufactured by Seasonic
7. OCZ - They own PC Power & Cooling
8. Fortron Source (FSP) - Inexpensive / good quality. To the best of my knowledge, Dell uses their PSU exclusively for all their desktop PCs.
a b ) Power supply
December 6, 2010 10:06:02 PM

A defective PSU is a hard thing to determine. I had one a while ago that fried hard drives like nobodies business, but it would take 2 months to do it. I went through 8 drives before finding the cause (PSU), each time lasting between 1 and 2 months before the drives started clicking and failing days after.

If you're really worried you could always do the paperclip mod, where you put a paperclip between the green and black wires on your 20 or 24 pin connecter and then turn the PSU on. It fools the PSU into thinking it's plugged into a monitor and it'll start up. Like this, you could plug in a few components like fans and maybe some old hard drives and test the PSU for heat issues etc.

Really though, the only way to properly test the PSU before putting it in your machine is to use a voltmeter and ammeter to test the outputs, and then have your PSU running in a working computer for a while to make sure there are no spikes or drops in current etc.
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a b ) Power supply
December 6, 2010 10:35:58 PM

Whats Neweggs policy on changing your mind??

Can't you just return and replace with a better quality psu?
a c 144 ) Power supply
December 6, 2010 11:30:10 PM

acer0169 said:

Really though, the only way to properly test the PSU before putting it in your machine is to use a voltmeter and ammeter to test the outputs put it on a testbench and load it to its full rated power at its rated operating temperature, ...


This is why there are few sites really testing power supplies. It is not a trivial (in the engineering sense) process.
a b ) Power supply
December 7, 2010 4:09:22 AM

The rosewill you ordered is a so-so model. Not something i would use long-term, but also not so terrible. Replace it asap with a high quality modwl from seasonoc,xfx, antec, etc...
a b ) Power supply
December 7, 2010 11:26:41 AM

jsc said:
This is why there are few sites really testing power supplies. It is not a trivial (in the engineering sense) process.


Thank you for the edit, kinda' what I was trying to suggest but it was 1AM when I posted and failed lol.
December 15, 2010 12:22:42 AM

Thanks for the feedback and suggestion guys!
Just wondering if an Antec Neopower 550W will be a better PSU for my system:

Gigabyte 870a-ud3
AMD Phenom II X965 (stock)
4 GB Gskill ddr3 ram
Asus GTX 460 768 mb (mild oc)
2 sata hard drives
a b ) Power supply
December 15, 2010 12:54:23 AM

yes, the antec neopower 550w will be sufficient
!