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SSD and old HDD in small space

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December 25, 2012 4:24:23 PM

Hello,

I was planning to purchase an SSD but I'm not sure if I have the space for it in my case.

The 3.5" enclosure area in my case for harddrives looks like it's about the height of 2 regular HDDs (2 WD Caviar Blacks to be specific, not sure how much height of HDDs differs). I just have one HDD in the enclosure right now, and was hoping to add an SSD, but I'm worried the heat from the old HDD could damage the SSD (or the limited space and the heat could damage the old HDD). I don't know much about this, but is this a valid concern, or are these things usually put in tight spaces like this? Also, since it seems most of the choices for SSD's seem to be 2.5" drives so I'll have to get a 2.5"-3.5" converter bracket. I was thinking for the converter bracket I could get http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX42137 which sounds like it has room for two 9.5mm tall SSDs. I was thinking I could just secure my SSD in the higher bracket so there would be separation from my old HDD below and the new SSD above, would this be a viable solution?

While I'm here, the SSD I was looking at was a 64GB Crucial M4. Would anyone recommend against this choice (my mother board only supports SATA II, so keeping in mind that I don't need the fastest thing on the market since it would probably just be limited by my SATA II anyways)? I just want to use the SSD to put whatever game I'm currently playing on it.

Thanks in advance!

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a c 311 G Storage
December 25, 2012 9:35:57 PM
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With SSDs as cheap as they are getting now, I would recommend a 120/128Gb drive, which on sale will be around $100 or less. Watch for a sale on slickdeals.net and http://www.logicbuy.com/categorydeals/computers/hard-dr...

SSDs operate fine in warm environments, and should be fine as long as your CPU and RAM can handle the heat, an SSD will too.

You don't really need to mount the drive with hardware, I often just set them in the bottom of the case or drive bay with a anti static bad sitting under them. SSDs don't have moving parts and are not damaged by movement while working like hard drives.

An SSD, any of them, will do fine on SATA 2, as most of the speed improvements relate to low seek times, and good random access. SATA 3 is most useful for getting high sequential reads and writes.

I would put the OS and most used games on the drive.
December 26, 2012 1:12:19 AM

Thanks for the answer! I think I will go for a larger drive.

I'm trying to find information on: http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item...

With the mail in rebate it seems like a really good price, but I think it's an older drive and I'm not sure if it is up to SATA 2 standards. It says just "SATA" in the Interface Type section, but the Interface section says both Serial ATA-150 and Serial ATA-300. I found a bit more information elsewhere, "Compatible with SATA 3 Gb/s with Native Command Queuing and SATA 1.5 Gb/s interface rates", but I'm not sure what Native Command Queueing is and if it is the same as a SATA II drive or not.

Does anyone know how this drive would hold up against the Crucial M4 (on my SATA II system)? The M4 has less space for a higher price, but if the Intel is a big loss in speed I'd rather go with the M4.

Thanks in advance!
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December 26, 2012 1:12:44 AM

Best answer selected by ekerik.
December 26, 2012 2:11:06 AM

ekerik said:
Thanks for the answer! I think I will go for a larger drive.

I'm trying to find information on: http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item...

With the mail in rebate it seems like a really good price, but I think it's an older drive and I'm not sure if it is up to SATA 2 standards. It says just "SATA" in the Interface Type section, but the Interface section says both Serial ATA-150 and Serial ATA-300. I found a bit more information elsewhere, "Compatible with SATA 3 Gb/s with Native Command Queuing and SATA 1.5 Gb/s interface rates", but I'm not sure what Native Command Queueing is and if it is the same as a SATA II drive or not.

Does anyone know how this drive would hold up against the Crucial M4 (on my SATA II system)? The M4 has less space for a higher price, but if the Intel is a big loss in speed I'd rather go with the M4.

Thanks in advance!

I think what you really want to know is how fast this old Intel x25 drive is compared to your current hard drive.
It is a noticeable speed increase. You will feel the difference immediately. It is rock solid reliable, will work with your SATA port and was very expensive back in mid 2009 when it came out.
Spec wise, it is about half the speed of the Crucial M4.

Here is a review from back in the day:
http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1022/1/

Whichever SSD you buy, you get around the heat issue by putting the HDD on top, and the SSD below where the HDD was.
Heat rises. Problem solved.

Newf.

.
a c 311 G Storage
December 26, 2012 6:46:33 AM

ekerik said:
Thanks for the answer! I think I will go for a larger drive.

I'm trying to find information on: http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/SearchTools/item...

With the mail in rebate it seems like a really good price, but I think it's an older drive and I'm not sure if it is up to SATA 2 standards. It says just "SATA" in the Interface Type section, but the Interface section says both Serial ATA-150 and Serial ATA-300. I found a bit more information elsewhere, "Compatible with SATA 3 Gb/s with Native Command Queuing and SATA 1.5 Gb/s interface rates", but I'm not sure what Native Command Queueing is and if it is the same as a SATA II drive or not.

Does anyone know how this drive would hold up against the Crucial M4 (on my SATA II system)? The M4 has less space for a higher price, but if the Intel is a big loss in speed I'd rather go with the M4.

Thanks in advance!
The X25-M is an excellent, albeit older drive. They are SATA II, but plenty fast for the money and highly reliable. It is pretty close to my M4 in real world use, but then the M4 is a 256Gb. I still use 2 160Gb and 3 80Gb X25-Ms and they last forever. In a write endurance test the 80Gb X25-M wrote over 883Tb before it died, which will take me decades to reach. From the tests the M4 is also a high endurance drive, as it wrote over 700Tb before death. Here are the numbers: http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?2710...

December 26, 2012 8:33:20 PM

+1 RealBeast.

You highlight well why the Intel drives are so good.

Specs are often misleading. The main issue is SSD vs. HDD. SSD always wins.
Because the system in question is not new, an older option can be a good one.

Thanks RealBeast.

Newf.

.
!