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PC case out of matches from scratch..

Last response: in Components
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December 8, 2010 3:48:23 PM

Hello all! I just started building a PC case using matches. I'm not sure if this has been done many times before or not but I wanted to create something and decided to use matches. This is actually my first real mod, or more like a complete build from the ground up. :lol: 



These are the matches that I bought. Well this is the first batch. If I need more, I will buy more. It cost me about $2.50 for a batch of 140 matchboxes (10 boxes wrapped, 2 of them aren't in the picture) which amounts to about 7,000 matches.



Here are what they look like, and then after stripping off the "heads"





Did some conceptual building and came up with this "wallpart". The case is going to be made of a series of these glued to make the casing.







My main goal is to make as much use of matches as possible with no metal at all. The only "foreign" parts I'm going to use are the match boxes themselves , as well as a special sliding plastic that I will use for sliding the motherboard out. Wish me luck!

More about : case matches scratch

a b ) Power supply
December 8, 2010 4:58:26 PM

Should be fun when you fire it up.
a b ) Power supply
December 8, 2010 5:53:39 PM



But in all seriousness, how is this a good idea?
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December 8, 2010 6:06:52 PM

Most mods wouldn't fit the "good idea" thought process. It's about creativity. And the fact that I don't want to spend money on a case. I'm going to receive my PC parts from the states, use the comp for about 6 months and move back to the states.

I guess to each their own.


On a side note, how would one go about filtering moisture out of cold air?
a b ) Power supply
December 8, 2010 6:07:50 PM

Looks like Lian LI have met their match...
a c 144 ) Power supply
December 8, 2010 8:04:15 PM

beano - boo, hiss. :kaola: 

ivan, in the event that this is a serious post ...

You cannot filter moisture out of cold air. A water molecule is small than a nitrogen or oxygen molecule.

You can heat the air which will reduce its relative humidity, but then you lose cooling capacity. You can remove moisture chemically by running it through a desiccating agent but that is a short term process. You can remove moisture mechanically by using a dehumidifier.

If you want cheap, my suggestion is to recycle an old case or simply do without:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...
!