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Cleaning up Background

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Anonymous
January 3, 2005 11:58:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks trashy.
What is the best way to clean up something like this. I tried the cut and
paste method, but when I do, it looks patched. I haven't learned anything
about levels yet and suspect that it might be the way to go. Any
suggestions?

http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38243784

Don Dunlap

More about : cleaning background

Anonymous
January 3, 2005 11:58:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <c7b62$41d9f84b$45234309$9121@allthenewsgroups.com>,
"Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote:

> I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks trashy.
> What is the best way to clean up something like this. I tried the cut and
> paste method, but when I do, it looks patched. I haven't learned anything
> about levels yet and suspect that it might be the way to go. Any
> suggestions?
>
> http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38243784
>
> Don Dunlap

Take the photo over again or spend a couple of hours painting over the
areas you don't like. No filtering will fix the fence near its tail.

The fence near your dog's head is fixable. Select the background,
feather the selection, then use "Dust and Scratches" or "Median" to
eliminate the wire pattern.
January 4, 2005 5:05:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I don't have a web photo hosting membership so I tried to send you an
email as follows:-

"Regarding your post in rec.digital I have had a go at improving the
background of your photo.First of all I filled the background using the
colour of the grass - I then cloned the grass not spending overlong
meeting the edges of Brandy(nice dog by the way!), but with the
background colour matching the grass this doesn't show too much.

I used Photoshop 7.0.

I hope this helps.

Denis Boisclair
Cheshire, England."

What I thought was your email address doesn't work -if you will let me
know what it should be I'll send you the edited photo.
Related resources
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 5:14:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Depends on how much you want to change it. You have to start by masking out
the dog. Then you can blur everything else....or you can blur the top and
not the bottom so much. You can put in a whole new back ground.


"Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote in message
news:c7b62$41d9f84b$45234309$9121@allthenewsgroups.com...
> I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks
trashy.
> What is the best way to clean up something like this. I tried the cut and
> paste method, but when I do, it looks patched. I haven't learned anything
> about levels yet and suspect that it might be the way to go. Any
> suggestions?
>
> http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38243784
>
> Don Dunlap
>
>
January 4, 2005 5:44:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Mask the top part of dog and clone in the grass from below.

"Gene Palmiter" <palmiter_gene@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:QZmCd.14379$sh5.11434@trndny08...
> Depends on how much you want to change it. You have to start by masking
out
> the dog. Then you can blur everything else....or you can blur the top and
> not the bottom so much. You can put in a whole new back ground.
>
>
> "Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote in message
> news:c7b62$41d9f84b$45234309$9121@allthenewsgroups.com...
> > I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks
> trashy.
> > What is the best way to clean up something like this. I tried the cut
and
> > paste method, but when I do, it looks patched. I haven't learned
anything
> > about levels yet and suspect that it might be the way to go. Any
> > suggestions?
> >
> > http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38243784
> >
> > Don Dunlap
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 5:44:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Perspective and DOF blur will have to be corrected on the cloned grass.
Not easy. Might as well paint over the fence or put the dog back in the
field for another photo.


In article <HqnCd.4258$Vj3.1708@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com>,
"Don" <d@d.com> wrote:

> Mask the top part of dog and clone in the grass from below.
>
> "Gene Palmiter" <palmiter_gene@verizon.net> wrote in message
> news:QZmCd.14379$sh5.11434@trndny08...
> > Depends on how much you want to change it. You have to start by masking
> out
> > the dog. Then you can blur everything else....or you can blur the top and
> > not the bottom so much. You can put in a whole new back ground.
> >
> >
> > "Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote in message
> > news:c7b62$41d9f84b$45234309$9121@allthenewsgroups.com...
> > > I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks
> > trashy.
> > > What is the best way to clean up something like this. I tried the cut
> and
> > > paste method, but when I do, it looks patched. I haven't learned
> anything
> > > about levels yet and suspect that it might be the way to go. Any
> > > suggestions?
> > >
> > > http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38243784
> > >
> > > Don Dunlap
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 10:07:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Just take out the 'rove' after dondunlap.

Don

<denis@boisclair.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:1104833106.519687.308290@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>I don't have a web photo hosting membership so I tried to send you an
> email as follows:-
>
> "Regarding your post in rec.digital I have had a go at improving the
> background of your photo.First of all I filled the background using the
> colour of the grass - I then cloned the grass not spending overlong
> meeting the edges of Brandy(nice dog by the way!), but with the
> background colour matching the grass this doesn't show too much.
>
> I used Photoshop 7.0.
>
> I hope this helps.
>
> Denis Boisclair
> Cheshire, England."
>
> What I thought was your email address doesn't work -if you will let me
> know what it should be I'll send you the edited photo.
>
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 10:20:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks for all the comments. It looks as if masking is the preferred method
and I am not familiar with layers yet. I bought the academic version of
Photoshop CS and it didn't have any documentation with it. I am learning
mainly by experimentation. The on-line tutorials are awkward to use.

I appreciate the comment to take the shot over again and believe me, I plan
to when the opportunity arises. With dogs, you generally have to take what
is available at the moment. If you look at my Pbase gallery, you can see
that I have taken a few snapshots of them playing and you can't pose them
for that. I keep everything and will keep the photo with the trashy
background. I had to put that temp fence up to keep them out of a garden
that they had been wrecking and you can see that they are digging in the
grass. Puppies are destructive!

I think that my main concern now is to learn Photoshop! I had planned to
take a course at the local community college, but other activities got in
the way. I will continue to work with PS and see if I can adopt some of
your suggestions, knowing that it won't be perfect, and waiting for the
opportunity to take the "PERFECT" shot. (Does that ever happen?)

One quick question - does masking involve using the magnetic lasso tool to
define the area to mask, or is there a simpler method?

Don Dunlap

"Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote in message
news:c7b62$41d9f84b$45234309$9121@allthenewsgroups.com...
>I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks
>trashy. What is the best way to clean up something like this. I tried the
>cut and paste method, but when I do, it looks patched. I haven't learned
>anything about levels yet and suspect that it might be the way to go. Any
>suggestions?
>
> http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38243784
>
> Don Dunlap
>
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 12:53:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1104850238.472019.131310@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Here's a quick and dirty 5 minute fixup using Photoshop's clone tool.
> You can do much better if you take your time.
> http://members.aol.com/annika1980/5minfix.jpg

Good for starters, but can you make the dog into a beagle too?
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 1:14:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1104850238.472019.131310@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Here's a quick and dirty 5 minute fixup using Photoshop's clone tool.
> You can do much better if you take your time.
> http://members.aol.com/annika1980/5minfix.jpg
>

Looks pretty good. I'll work on it.

Thanks
Don Dunlap
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 5:36:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> "Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote:
>
>> I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks
>trashy.
>> What is the best way to clean up something like this.

The background can be easily replaced using the clone tool. Getting the dog in
focus is gonna be a little tougher.
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 5:36:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20050104093653.08032.00002757@mb-m07.aol.com...
>> "Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote:
>>
>>> I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks
>>trashy.
>>> What is the best way to clean up something like this.
>
> The background can be easily replaced using the clone tool. Getting the
> dog in
> focus is gonna be a little tougher.
>
>

I have another photo with the dog in better focus, I just didn't include
part of her tail in the shot. . The IS will not work when you move the
camera as much as I was doing that day. The opportunities to shoot came up
quickly and the dogs moved so much that I didn't ensure that I was remaining
still before clicking the shutter. I also have a bad habit of moving the
camera almost immediately after clicking the shutter. I don't know how to
break myself of that bad habit.

Don
January 4, 2005 5:58:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote in
news:37f69$41da8a02$45234422$32068@allthenewsgroups.com:

> One quick question - does masking involve using the magnetic lasso
> tool to define the area to mask, or is there a simpler method?
>
>

You should check out the two usenet photoshop groups.

You can make a new layer mask by duplicating the layer (on the layer
pallet menu) and then clicking the "add a mask" button, also on the
pallet. The mask will be red, by default. You edit the mask just like any
other layer by cliking on it in the layer pallet. You can use all the
editing tools. In the case of your dog photo, The magic wand tool will
automatically select the all the colors that are similar to the one you
clik on. The tollarance setting will make it more or less generous in
it's selections. Then you can use all the tools to edit the mask. Alt-
clicking on the mask in the layer pallet will change the display to the
mask itself, instead of the image.

Bob
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 5:58:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"bob" <Jwx1.nothing@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:Xns95D4665F7A713j123w123x123@216.77.188.18...
> "Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote in
> news:37f69$41da8a02$45234422$32068@allthenewsgroups.com:
>
>> One quick question - does masking involve using the magnetic lasso
>> tool to define the area to mask, or is there a simpler method?
>>
>>
>
> You should check out the two usenet photoshop groups.
>
> You can make a new layer mask by duplicating the layer (on the layer
> pallet menu) and then clicking the "add a mask" button, also on the
> pallet. The mask will be red, by default. You edit the mask just like any
> other layer by cliking on it in the layer pallet. You can use all the
> editing tools. In the case of your dog photo, The magic wand tool will
> automatically select the all the colors that are similar to the one you
> clik on. The tollarance setting will make it more or less generous in
> it's selections. Then you can use all the tools to edit the mask. Alt-
> clicking on the mask in the layer pallet will change the display to the
> mask itself, instead of the image.
>
> Bob

I printed your response and will digest it and try to work on it that way
also. You are using terms that I am not yet familiar with, but will
experiment with.

Thanks,
Don
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 6:13:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Cynicor" <j.t.r.u..p.i..n...@speakeasy.net> wrote in message
news:q62dnfInRYJTMEfcRVn-pw@speakeasy.net...
>
> "Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:1104850238.472019.131310@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>> Here's a quick and dirty 5 minute fixup using Photoshop's clone tool.
>> You can do much better if you take your time.
>> http://members.aol.com/annika1980/5minfix.jpg
>
> Good for starters, but can you make the dog into a beagle too?
>
Nope....but how about a cat ?

www.ekuk.fsnet.co.uk/cog.jpg

Dennis
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 6:13:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Dennis Bradley" <dennis@no_spam_please_dbradley.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:
>
> "Cynicor" <j.t.r.u..p.i..n...@speakeasy.net> wrote:
>>
>> "Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote:
>>> Here's a quick and dirty 5 minute fixup using Photoshop's clone tool.
>>> You can do much better if you take your time.
>>> http://members.aol.com/annika1980/5minfix.jpg
>>
>> Good for starters, but can you make the dog into a beagle too?
>>
> Nope....but how about a cat ?
>
> www.ekuk.fsnet.co.uk/cog.jpg

You know, I've always wondered what Brandy would look like running next to a
huge fake tsunami wave, then arguing about the existence of God.
January 4, 2005 6:38:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote in
news:b9e34$41dab3b8$45234156$5122@allthenewsgroups.com:

> I printed your response and will digest it and try to work on it that
> way also. You are using terms that I am not yet familiar with, but
> will experiment with.
>

Photoshop is probably the most complex software I use. I've been using it
for years, but I still keep finding new features. One of the real keys to
productivity is to learn what the keyboard shortcuts are; many of them are
left hand, while the mouse stays active in the right. They are especially
useful for switching tools without moving the mouse.

Bob
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 6:38:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"bob" <Jwx1.nothing@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:Xns95D46D049D9C6j123w123x123@216.77.188.18...
> "Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote in
> news:b9e34$41dab3b8$45234156$5122@allthenewsgroups.com:
>
>> I printed your response and will digest it and try to work on it that
>> way also. You are using terms that I am not yet familiar with, but
>> will experiment with.
>>
>
> Photoshop is probably the most complex software I use. I've been using it
> for years, but I still keep finding new features. One of the real keys to
> productivity is to learn what the keyboard shortcuts are; many of them are
> left hand, while the mouse stays active in the right. They are especially
> useful for switching tools without moving the mouse.
>
> Bob

A friend told me that he bought a special keyboard that contains special
keys for Photoshop shortcuts. He loved it and I think maybe I'll look into
getting one.

Don
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 6:45:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Don Dunlap wrote:
> "bob" <Jwx1.nothing@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
>
> I printed your response and will digest it and try to work on it that way
> also. You are using terms that I am not yet familiar with, but will
> experiment with.
>
You might consider buying Classroom in a Book on Photoshop CS, and not
just because it's likely to be your text once you enroll in a class.

Also, there's extensive help in the PS CS menu. With a search function.

--
John McWilliams
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 6:45:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"John McWilliams" <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:p SyCd.847866$8_6.832100@attbi_s04...
> Don Dunlap wrote:
>> "bob" <Jwx1.nothing@bellsouth.net> wrote in message I printed your
>> response and will digest it and try to work on it that way also. You are
>> using terms that I am not yet familiar with, but will experiment with.
>>
> You might consider buying Classroom in a Book on Photoshop CS, and not
> just because it's likely to be your text once you enroll in a class.
>
> Also, there's extensive help in the PS CS menu. With a search function.
>
> --
> John McWilliams

I'll look for the book. Thanks

Don
January 4, 2005 6:55:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John McWilliams <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in news:p SyCd.847866$8_6.832100
@attbi_s04:

> Also, there's extensive help in the PS CS menu. With a search function.
>

I've been using PS 6 for years, and I hate the online help system.
Hopefully it' sbeen improved in two versions. I find that the
nomenclature is often obscure and they assume too much about what I know.
They frequently mention a tool or process by name, without spelling out
exactly how to do something. I tried to get the perspective crop tool to
function for ages without much luck. I get the same error all the time,
but the help doesn't really spell out what I need to do to make it work
correctly. I found another tool to do perspective now, and it works
great.

I should buy one of those aftermarket books that is more of a tutorial
than a reference.

Bob
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 6:55:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"bob" <Jwx1.nothing@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:Xns95D46FFD4E8B2j123w123x123@216.77.188.18...
> John McWilliams <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in news:p SyCd.847866$8_6.832100
> @attbi_s04:
>
>> Also, there's extensive help in the PS CS menu. With a search function.
>>
>
> I've been using PS 6 for years, and I hate the online help system.
> Hopefully it' sbeen improved in two versions. I find that the
> nomenclature is often obscure and they assume too much about what I know.
> They frequently mention a tool or process by name, without spelling out
> exactly how to do something. I tried to get the perspective crop tool to
> function for ages without much luck. I get the same error all the time,
> but the help doesn't really spell out what I need to do to make it work
> correctly. I found another tool to do perspective now, and it works
> great.
>
> I should buy one of those aftermarket books that is more of a tutorial
> than a reference.
>
> Bob

I find that the on-line help is too awkward and vague to use. I agree with
you that it assumes that you already know too much.

Don
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 7:05:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Don Dunlap wrote:
>
> I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks trashy.
> What is the best way to clean up something like this. I tried the cut and
> paste method, but when I do, it looks patched. I haven't learned anything
> about levels yet and suspect that it might be the way to go. Any
> suggestions?
>
> http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38243784
>
> Don Dunlap

Correcting backgrounds like this can be awkward and time-consuming.
Unless there are other factors preventing, I would take more pics of
your dog with a better background, rather than attempting to resurrect
this shot.

Colin
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 7:08:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

bob wrote:

> John McWilliams <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in news:p SyCd.847866$8_6.832100
> @attbi_s04:
>
>
>>Also, there's extensive help in the PS CS menu. With a search function.
>>
>
>
> I've been using PS 6 for years, and I hate the online help system.
> Hopefully it' sbeen improved in two versions. I find that the
> nomenclature is often obscure and they assume too much about what I know.
> They frequently mention a tool or process by name, without spelling out
> exactly how to do something. I tried to get the perspective crop tool to
> function for ages without much luck. I get the same error all the time,
> but the help doesn't really spell out what I need to do to make it work
> correctly. I found another tool to do perspective now, and it works
> great.
>
> I should buy one of those aftermarket books that is more of a tutorial
> than a reference.
>
PS CS has built in help that I find straight forward and pretty useful.
Because it's browser based, it may appear to be online, but it ain't.
(Don't know about 6 or 7).

--
John McWilliams
January 4, 2005 7:18:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

John McWilliams <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in news:7czCd.22318$wu4.13958
@attbi_s52:

> PS CS has built in help that I find straight forward and pretty useful.
> Because it's browser based, it may appear to be online, but it ain't.
> (Don't know about 6 or 7).
>

It's "online" as opposed to "off line," (i.e. "printed"). Many (most?)
software vendors (including Adobe) call any hard drive based help system
"online".

Page 2 of my user manual: "to start online help: ... choose Help > help
contents [or] press F1." As you say, it is a browser based system,
residing on the hard drive.

Bob
January 4, 2005 8:03:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <c7b62$41d9f84b$45234309$9121@allthenewsgroups.com>,
dondunlaprove@direcway.com says...
>
>I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks trashy.
>What is the best way to clean up something like this. I tried the cut and
>paste method, but when I do, it looks patched. I haven't learned anything
>about levels yet and suspect that it might be the way to go. Any
>suggestions?
>
>http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38243784
>
>Don Dunlap

Don,

It should not be that difficult to help this image along. I'm assuming work in
Photoshop CS, as that is what I'd use.

Start with a mask of Brandy. The method of creating this mask is pretty much
up to you. I'd make a rough Selection, with say the Lasso Tool, and then go
into Quick Mask to do the touch up around the edges, with a small soft-edged
brush for the fur. Save this Selection, as you will use it as an A-B mask
later.

Load the Selection, if it is not still active and Invert, so you now have the
foreground-background selected. On the left, you have mulch, which I'd Clone
to cover the fence. Note that the DOF falls off to the rear, so you'll want to
do the Cloning from areas with similar focus. Since you will be doing a Blur
on the background later, it isn't essential to get it exact, but close is
better than not.

On the center of the background I'd Clone a bit more of the shrubbery, and
take out the fence post. Here you have some of the out-of-focus mulch to work
with too. On the right side, I'd Clone some of the grass up a bit, and then
use mulch and the green plants on the far right. Since you have Brandy
effectively masked "out" of your work area, you can Clone with abandon, just
getting the texture correct. There might well be times that the Patch Tool, or
Healing Brush would work better, than the Clone Tool (Rubber Stamp).

When satisfied, with the Inverse Selection still active, go back into QM and
then Load Selection Quick Mask. Use the Gradient Tool to produce a graduated
mask within the area that you have already used as your mask. The graduated
mask is created (and Saved) to do your Blur, as it simulates the DOF of the
camera's lens. Experiment with Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur. Since you have a
graduated mask, the foreground will receive no blurring, and the background
will get the full treatment. I'd also add some Noise to the background, after
the Blur, so that it doesn't appear too "smooth." Again, the graduated mask
should work for this, keeping the noise out of the foreground, and gradually
increasing it to the background. You might also play with adjusting the
brightness and contrast of the background. Here, I'd use an Adjustment Layer
with either Levels or Curves, but exact method is up to you. You might also
Desaturate the background a bit.

Since the point of focus is slightly beyond Brandy, unfortunately, a bit of
Filter>Sharpen>Unsharp Mask should help "pop" the puppy from the background.
By making your original Selection active (not the Inverse, or the graduated
version used above), the sharpening will effect Brandy only. I think I'd add
an Adjustment Layer(s) for a bit more Saturation, and Levels/Curves, as well.

At this point, Save_As PSD, so you can go back if you wish, then Flatten and
Save_As whatever format you want, JPG, TIFF, etc.

Hunt
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 8:03:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Hunt" <noone@hunt.com> wrote in message
news:crei8u05fl@news1.newsguy.com...
> In article <c7b62$41d9f84b$45234309$9121@allthenewsgroups.com>,
> dondunlaprove@direcway.com says...
>>
>>I like this photo I took of one of my dogs, but the background looks
>>trashy.
>>What is the best way to clean up something like this. I tried the cut and
>>paste method, but when I do, it looks patched. I haven't learned anything
>>about levels yet and suspect that it might be the way to go. Any
>>suggestions?
>>
>>http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38243784
>>
>>Don Dunlap
>
> Don,
>
> It should not be that difficult to help this image along. I'm assuming
> work in
> Photoshop CS, as that is what I'd use.
>
> Start with a mask of Brandy. The method of creating this mask is pretty
> much
> up to you. I'd make a rough Selection, with say the Lasso Tool, and then
> go
> into Quick Mask to do the touch up around the edges, with a small
> soft-edged
> brush for the fur. Save this Selection, as you will use it as an A-B mask
> later.
>
> Load the Selection, if it is not still active and Invert, so you now have
> the
> foreground-background selected. On the left, you have mulch, which I'd
> Clone
> to cover the fence. Note that the DOF falls off to the rear, so you'll
> want to
> do the Cloning from areas with similar focus. Since you will be doing a
> Blur
> on the background later, it isn't essential to get it exact, but close is
> better than not.
>
> On the center of the background I'd Clone a bit more of the shrubbery, and
> take out the fence post. Here you have some of the out-of-focus mulch to
> work
> with too. On the right side, I'd Clone some of the grass up a bit, and
> then
> use mulch and the green plants on the far right. Since you have Brandy
> effectively masked "out" of your work area, you can Clone with abandon,
> just
> getting the texture correct. There might well be times that the Patch
> Tool, or
> Healing Brush would work better, than the Clone Tool (Rubber Stamp).
>
> When satisfied, with the Inverse Selection still active, go back into QM
> and
> then Load Selection Quick Mask. Use the Gradient Tool to produce a
> graduated
> mask within the area that you have already used as your mask. The
> graduated
> mask is created (and Saved) to do your Blur, as it simulates the DOF of
> the
> camera's lens. Experiment with Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur. Since you have a
> graduated mask, the foreground will receive no blurring, and the
> background
> will get the full treatment. I'd also add some Noise to the background,
> after
> the Blur, so that it doesn't appear too "smooth." Again, the graduated
> mask
> should work for this, keeping the noise out of the foreground, and
> gradually
> increasing it to the background. You might also play with adjusting the
> brightness and contrast of the background. Here, I'd use an Adjustment
> Layer
> with either Levels or Curves, but exact method is up to you. You might
> also
> Desaturate the background a bit.
>
> Since the point of focus is slightly beyond Brandy, unfortunately, a bit
> of
> Filter>Sharpen>Unsharp Mask should help "pop" the puppy from the
> background.
> By making your original Selection active (not the Inverse, or the
> graduated
> version used above), the sharpening will effect Brandy only. I think I'd
> add
> an Adjustment Layer(s) for a bit more Saturation, and Levels/Curves, as
> well.
>
> At this point, Save_As PSD, so you can go back if you wish, then Flatten
> and
> Save_As whatever format you want, JPG, TIFF, etc.
>
> Hunt
>

Hunt,

I haven't really digested your response yet but have a question. Could I
make a mask of Brandy as you are suggesting and then just take another photo
of a clear area in the yard and paste her into the clear area? How would
that look?

Don
January 4, 2005 8:07:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <pSyCd.847866$8_6.832100@attbi_s04>, jpmcw@comcast.net says...
>
>Don Dunlap wrote:
>> "bob" <Jwx1.nothing@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
>>
>> I printed your response and will digest it and try to work on it that way
>> also. You are using terms that I am not yet familiar with, but will
>> experiment with.
>>
>You might consider buying Classroom in a Book on Photoshop CS, and not
>just because it's likely to be your text once you enroll in a class.
>
>Also, there's extensive help in the PS CS menu. With a search function.
>
>--
>John McWilliams

Good suggestion. Most of the "fixes" that I outlined in another article in
this thread are covered in CRIAB. AND, as you state, it is possibly the text
for many Community College course in PS.

Hunt
January 4, 2005 8:11:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <Xns95D46FFD4E8B2j123w123x123@216.77.188.18>, Jwx1.
nothing@bellsouth.net says...
>
>John McWilliams <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in news:p SyCd.847866$8_6.832100
>@attbi_s04:
>
>> Also, there's extensive help in the PS CS menu. With a search function.
>>
>
>I've been using PS 6 for years, and I hate the online help system.
>Hopefully it' sbeen improved in two versions. I find that the
>nomenclature is often obscure and they assume too much about what I know.
>They frequently mention a tool or process by name, without spelling out
>exactly how to do something. I tried to get the perspective crop tool to
>function for ages without much luck. I get the same error all the time,
>but the help doesn't really spell out what I need to do to make it work
>correctly. I found another tool to do perspective now, and it works
>great.
>
>I should buy one of those aftermarket books that is more of a tutorial
>than a reference.
>
>Bob

I feel that it has actually gotten worse. In the old PS days, the manual was
very good. Now, it only lists the topics and refers one to Online Help. If one
knows the exact naming convention of the topic, the answers might well be
there, but Adobe isn't as consistant with that naming, as I feel they should
be. Because of the power of PS, and the lack of a good manual and intuitive
Help, the market is growing for specific books on the program. The
aforementioned CRIAB is a good start, but my library has about fifty "must
have" volumes (many nearly duplicates for various versions of PS) on various
aspects of the program. OTOH, I'd NOT give up PS, and the learning that takes
place every time I use it, which is daily!

Hunt
January 4, 2005 8:14:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <7czCd.22318$wu4.13958@attbi_s52>, jpmcw@comcast.net says...
>
>bob wrote:
>
>> John McWilliams <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in news:p SyCd.847866$8_6.832100
>> @attbi_s04:
>>
>>
>>>Also, there's extensive help in the PS CS menu. With a search function.
>>>
>>
>>
>> I've been using PS 6 for years, and I hate the online help system.
>> Hopefully it' sbeen improved in two versions. I find that the
>> nomenclature is often obscure and they assume too much about what I know.
>> They frequently mention a tool or process by name, without spelling out
>> exactly how to do something. I tried to get the perspective crop tool to
>> function for ages without much luck. I get the same error all the time,
>> but the help doesn't really spell out what I need to do to make it work
>> correctly. I found another tool to do perspective now, and it works
>> great.
>>
>> I should buy one of those aftermarket books that is more of a tutorial
>> than a reference.
>>
>PS CS has built in help that I find straight forward and pretty useful.
>Because it's browser based, it may appear to be online, but it ain't.
>(Don't know about 6 or 7).
>
>--
>John McWilliams

John,

I wish that I felt the same about the Help, as you. I puzzle over just who
wrote much of it, and what they were thinking. A lot of my consternation
probably comes from all of my learning being print-based. I still pine for the
"good ole days." :-} Maybe it just belies my advanced age, or something...

Hunt
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 8:20:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Don Dunlap wrote:

> "bob" <Jwx1.nothing@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
> news:Xns95D46D049D9C6j123w123x123@216.77.188.18...
>
>>Photoshop is probably the most complex software I use. I've been using it
>>for years, but I still keep finding new features. One of the real keys to
>>productivity is to learn what the keyboard shortcuts are; many of them are
>>left hand, while the mouse stays active in the right. They are especially
>>useful for switching tools without moving the mouse.
>
> A friend told me that he bought a special keyboard that contains special
> keys for Photoshop shortcuts. He loved it and I think maybe I'll look into
> getting one.
>

Shortcuts are good, but a special keyboard?? Better, I think, to invest
in a Wacom tablet first.

--
John McWilliams
January 4, 2005 9:26:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Don Dunlap" <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote in
news:7487d$41dad919$4523497a$10133@allthenewsgroups.com:

> I haven't really digested your response yet but have a question.
> Could I make a mask of Brandy as you are suggesting and then just take
> another photo of a clear area in the yard and paste her into the clear
> area? How would that look?
>

I did that with a photo of myself. I was standing in a hotel room in
formal wear, which I almost never wear. I pasted myself into a photo of
my backyard.

In order to work well, there are three things you need to pay attention
to. The lighting must match. The scale must match, and the part where the
feet touch the ground needs to look "right." If you have direct sunlight,
then you need a shadow, but since the light is flat in your picture, that
wouldn't be an issue.

Bob
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 4:24:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 07:20:11 -0500, "Don Dunlap"
<dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote:

>Thanks for all the comments. It looks as if masking is the preferred method
>and I am not familiar with layers yet. I bought the academic version of
>Photoshop CS and it didn't have any documentation with it. I am learning
>mainly by experimentation. The on-line tutorials are awkward to use.
....
>One quick question - does masking involve using the magnetic lasso tool to
>define the area to mask, or is there a simpler method?

Quick Mask Mode - keyboard shortcut "Q" - paint in white to mask,
black to unmask.

"Extract" filter. Much different than the other filters. Outline the
object you want to select, "fill" the area that should be selected,
and it will figure out the boundaries for you.

John
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 3:32:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"John Russell" <netnews10@johnrussell.mailshell.com> wrote in message
news:k9gmt014bs6bsrjo6qa9n3k3c4f5otrgi0@4ax.com...
> On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 07:20:11 -0500, "Don Dunlap"
> <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> wrote:
>
>>Thanks for all the comments. It looks as if masking is the preferred
>>method
>>and I am not familiar with layers yet. I bought the academic version of
>>Photoshop CS and it didn't have any documentation with it. I am learning
>>mainly by experimentation. The on-line tutorials are awkward to use.
> ...
>>One quick question - does masking involve using the magnetic lasso tool to
>>define the area to mask, or is there a simpler method?
>
> Quick Mask Mode - keyboard shortcut "Q" - paint in white to mask,
> black to unmask.
>
> "Extract" filter. Much different than the other filters. Outline the
> object you want to select, "fill" the area that should be selected,
> and it will figure out the boundaries for you.

Am I missing something with the "extract" filter ? It seems to me that to
get a halfway decent extraction, you need to select the image boundaries
highly accurately with the highlighter. This seems like the same amount of
work that you need to do to select the same item either via masking or
regular selection.....

I don't get it. Every time I use a bigger brush or sloppier selection,
extract gives me garbage results.
January 5, 2005 11:05:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <7487d$41dad919$4523497a$10133@allthenewsgroups.com>,
dondunlaprove@direcway.com says...
>
>
>"Hunt" <noone@hunt.com> wrote in message
>news:crei8u05fl@news1.newsguy.com...
>> In article <c7b62$41d9f84b$45234309$9121@allthenewsgroups.com>,
>> dondunlaprove@direcway.com says...

[SNIP]
>
>I haven't really digested your response yet but have a question. Could I
>make a mask of Brandy as you are suggesting and then just take another photo
>of a clear area in the yard and paste her into the clear area? How would
>that look?
>
>Don

Don,

That wasn't exactly what I was saying, however, once you have the "Brandy
mask" done, you can easily Copy (Ctrl-c) that part of the image, and Paste (
Ctrl-v) it into another background. What I'd do, if I were going to assemble
Brandy into another bkgd. is shoot something with similar grass in the
foreground, as his paws are partially obscured by the blades of grass. If he
were placed into a scene of the Sonoran Desert, for instance, you'd have to
create the rest of the paws to make it look right. Also, consider the lighting
in your original shot, and go for something similar.

Hunt

PS, I understand getting shots of one's dogs. They are always looking their
best, or acting the cutest, when amongst the worst possible backgrounds! How
do they know?!?!?!
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 11:05:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Hunt" <noone@hunt.com> wrote in message
news:crhhb02h29@news2.newsguy.com...
> In article <7487d$41dad919$4523497a$10133@allthenewsgroups.com>,
> dondunlaprove@direcway.com says...
>>
>>
>>"Hunt" <noone@hunt.com> wrote in message
>>news:crei8u05fl@news1.newsguy.com...
>>> In article <c7b62$41d9f84b$45234309$9121@allthenewsgroups.com>,
>>> dondunlaprove@direcway.com says...
>
> [SNIP]
>>
>>I haven't really digested your response yet but have a question. Could I
>>make a mask of Brandy as you are suggesting and then just take another
>>photo
>>of a clear area in the yard and paste her into the clear area? How would
>>that look?
>>
>>Don
>
> Don,
>
> That wasn't exactly what I was saying, however, once you have the "Brandy
> mask" done, you can easily Copy (Ctrl-c) that part of the image, and Paste
> (
> Ctrl-v) it into another background. What I'd do, if I were going to
> assemble
> Brandy into another bkgd. is shoot something with similar grass in the
> foreground, as his paws are partially obscured by the blades of grass. If
> he
> were placed into a scene of the Sonoran Desert, for instance, you'd have
> to
> create the rest of the paws to make it look right. Also, consider the
> lighting
> in your original shot, and go for something similar.
>
> Hunt
>
> PS, I understand getting shots of one's dogs. They are always looking
> their
> best, or acting the cutest, when amongst the worst possible backgrounds!
> How
> do they know?!?!?!
>

I just ordered Classroom in a Book Photoshop CS and am waiting for it to
come and make me an immediate expert in PS. :)  Some of the responses I
have gotten to my post have gone over my head and I need to "speak the
language". I have been experimenting with the various suggestions and so
far, I haven't done too well. I am just waiting for Brandy to assume the
same pose in a better area. We have a huge back yard and I should get
something some day.

Thanks everyone for their suggestions. I learn something from each one.
(Usually I learn that I am too old).

Don
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 3:31:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <4a20$41dc7e10$4523467b$8151@allthenewsgroups.com>, Don
Dunlap <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> writes

>Thanks everyone for their suggestions. I learn something from each one.
>(Usually I learn that I am too old).

Don,

Here's the best tutorial I found to do what you want:

http://www.myjanee.com/tuts/hair/hair.htm


--
Alan ............
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 3:31:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Alan Terry" <alan@successful.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:LkVC55AS+S3BFwlj@successful.demon.co.uk...
> In article <4a20$41dc7e10$4523467b$8151@allthenewsgroups.com>, Don
> Dunlap <dondunlaprove@direcway.com> writes
>
>>Thanks everyone for their suggestions. I learn something from each one.
>>(Usually I learn that I am too old).
>
> Don,
>
> Here's the best tutorial I found to do what you want:
>
> http://www.myjanee.com/tuts/hair/hair.htm
>
>
> --
> Alan ............
>

Thanks, I printed that tutorial and will try it.

Don
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 3:47:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I have almost given up on the background of the photo of Brandy with the
trashy fenced in area behind her. This photo that I took this morning
turned out pretty good. I took about 20 shots of the two laying in the yard
and they cooperated to produce these two and a couple of others that were
keepers.

http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/38348656
http://www.pbase.com/dondunlap/image/383486565

Pbase has been very flaky lately, so they may not be viewable immediately.

Don Dunlap
!