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Z68 Features or P67 stability?

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August 6, 2011 6:33:09 PM

Hey all,

I am building a new rig around an i5 2500k CPU and I am having a really hard time deciding on a motherboard for it.

I don't know whether I should get the new featured z68 board which from my research is still having MANY stability issues, or a P67 board which is now a very stable board albeit minus the new features.

What my rig will be used for:
1. Games - I am a big time gamer * Will be 2 running cards in SLI
2. Overclocking - Definitely looking to OC all my components (RAM, CPU, Vid Card)
3. video transcoding - I use DVD Shrink a lot, DVD Fab, converting of blu-ray to .mkv video files, converting to iPod

I do not have an SSD drive, nor do I plan on getting one until the prices go WAY down.

I also want a board that will be Ivy Bridge compatible as a future proofing measure, but I have seen that both P67 and z68 boards will allow for Ivy Bridge???

Anyway, LucidVirtu is a feature that caught my eye, but I hear nVidia is coming out with their own tech that does the same thing but better? I just don't know if that feature is going to be worth the hassle for me, with all the stability issues the z68 is having.

Input will be greatly appreciated.

The boards I am looking at are:
z68 - Asus P8Z68-V Pro or an Asrock z68 Extreme4
P67 - Asrock P67 Extreme4 B3 or GEN 3

August 7, 2011 2:09:07 AM

From personal experience, I can say the P67 will OC an i5-2600k JUST FINE. I however have not OCd RAM or Vid card. Mostly because the GPU was already overclocked on that build.

However, with expereince in the z68 I can Honestly say OCing RAM is a PAIN! It never wants to recognize anything but 1600 from my experience.

Also, you dont have an SSD and from what Ive read the z68 really compliments SSDs. So aside from saving some $$$ Id still go with the P67. Stability is Key, especially when OCing.

Hope this helps :D 
August 7, 2011 3:36:23 AM

Go with p67. z68 is pointless really. If you don't have a SSD, there is no point. Especially for a gaming build. Bottom line, z68 isn't as spectacular as it seems.
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August 7, 2011 5:38:17 AM

Another vote for P67. Unless you view fast video encoding to be important too. Otherwise save the $$.
a c 216 V Motherboard
August 7, 2011 5:03:50 PM

If you will do video editing, AND you want overclocking, then I think you are looking at Z68.

I am no expert on video, but I understand that the integrated grapnics can help a lot; Quicksync, I think it is called. If that will be beneficial to you, then look at Z68.

August 7, 2011 5:07:52 PM

Yeah do for z68 if you are really heavy on that stuff, but other than that, there's no point.
August 7, 2011 6:47:06 PM

I mean I do a lot of video encoding converting blu-rays to .mkv which does take a long time on my current rig, but at the same time the stability issues with the z68 boards scare me off. If the z68 was stable, I would have no trouble at all going z68. But with the memory issues, the boot to post times, the pc not recovering from sleep. I dont know if that is worth the trouble for faster video encoding. Does anyone with a z68 board not experience any of the issues above?
August 7, 2011 7:25:39 PM

Of the boards you have listed I would go with Asus or Asrock Z68. I would go with the Asrock z68 Extreme4 Gen3. All boards have issues when they first come out, and these issues are typically resolved through people actually learning how to set up their boards properly (most "issues" are human error) and through BIOS updates for actual proven issues. The p67 boards had issues when they first came out. Actually, the p67 boards had far worse issues as they had to be recalled.
a c 216 V Motherboard
August 7, 2011 10:34:52 PM

trulaker9 said:
I mean I do a lot of video encoding converting blu-rays to .mkv which does take a long time on my current rig, but at the same time the stability issues with the z68 boards scare me off. If the z68 was stable, I would have no trouble at all going z68. But with the memory issues, the boot to post times, the pc not recovering from sleep. I dont know if that is worth the trouble for faster video encoding. Does anyone with a z68 board not experience any of the issues above?


Look at egg reviews with a bit of skepticism. Most will not posr unless they had some sort of an issue.

Do take the time to get verified compatible ram. It costs no more.
You want documented ram compatibility. If you should ever have a problem, you want supported ram.
Otherwise, you risk a finger pointing battle between the ram and motherboard support sites, claiming "not my problem".
One place to check is your motherboards web site.
Look for the ram QVL list. It lists all of the ram kits that have been tested with that particular motherboard.
Sometimes the QVL list is not updated after the motherboard is released.
For more current info, go to a ram vendor's web site and access their ram selection configurator.
Enter your motherboard, and you will get a list of compatible ram kits.
While today's motherboards are more tolerant of different ram, it makes sense to buy ram that is known to work and is supported.
!