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Is there a 5400 or 7200 RPM replacement for Hitachi DK23BA..

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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December 29, 2004 10:28:29 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I'm replacing 10G Hitachi DK23BA-10, which runs at 4200RPM.
What choices do I have for 5400 or 7200RPM? The notebook is
an old Compaq Presario 1700 with a P3 CPU.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 29, 2004 11:17:25 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

pont wrote:
> I'm replacing 10G Hitachi DK23BA-10, which runs at 4200RPM.
> What choices do I have for 5400 or 7200RPM? The notebook is
> an old Compaq Presario 1700 with a P3 CPU.

It is my frank opinion that there is little to be gained with a 7200rpm
drive on that vintage laptop; 5400rpm might show an improvement
depending on if DMA is available in the BIOS. www.notebookdrive.com ,
www.newegg.com, www.zipzoomfly.com will show availability of replacement
drives, but you will need to know the BIOS limitation on drive capacity
for your computer so that you can effictively partition the new drive.

Q
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 30, 2004 12:46:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

It might be possibly come o more heat production which does in effect make
the whole system unstable- so beware to upgrade to an 7200rpm drive- are
there any out there for reasonable prices? So if your laptop is a big one it
does not have as much negative effect as in a -say- subnotebook. You should
be able to use any available HDD up to 40 or 60GB. But if your laptop was
built for 10GB and a really old CPU which heats up enormously you may stay
with a 30GB and an additional external HDD..
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 30, 2004 11:33:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Stevie Kranz wrote:
> It might be possibly come o more heat production which does in effect
> make the whole system unstable- so beware to upgrade to an 7200rpm
> drive- are there any out there for reasonable prices? So if your
> laptop is a big one it does not have as much negative effect as in a
> -say- subnotebook. You should be able to use any available HDD up to
> 40 or 60GB. But if your laptop was built for 10GB and a really old
> CPU which heats up enormously you may stay with a 30GB and an
> additional external HDD..

The new generation of laptop drives have improved drive, head, and
lubrication technologies that lead to less power requirement and cooler
operation than even older, but more recent drives than the 6 year old
10GB, 4200 rpm drive the OP currently uses. It's not much of a risk to
upgrade IMO.

Q
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 30, 2004 9:23:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> The new generation of laptop drives have ...cooler operation than even
> older, but more recent drives than the 6 year old 10GB, 4200 rpm drive the
> OP currently uses. It's not much of a risk to upgrade IMO.

I missed that you are right. But is it really so much improvement? Would be
great. Anyway are older laptop in bigger dimensions which makes them cooler
overall, but I am nevertheless a bit threatened.
!