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Adding a graphic card to HP Pavilion 6510 or 6520?

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August 10, 2010 10:16:33 PM

I've been considering buying an HP Pavilion 6510f or a 6520f, but I noticed it only has integrated graphics, so I decided I'd buy the computer (It's from a friend, nearly new, 250$ :p ) and then add in a video card that will allow occasional photo shopping and gaming. Nothing too extreme.

However, I went on HP's website and found that the power supply that comes with those two are 250w. I believe I read somewhere even the lowest level of graphic cards require 300w. Since I probably need to upgrade the PSU as well, how should I go about doing this? I'm not very experienced at changing computer components myself, but I thought HP prebuilt computers often don't fit well with other PSU's. Does anyone have any suggestions for PSUs, or graphic cards they know will for sure work with the HP Pavilion 6510f/6520f? Also, for the PSU, since those two models use a micro verson of ATX motherboards I believe, would it be better to look for a new case that comes with a power supply to ensure everything would fit well?

I'm not too worried about the psychically changing parts/adding in cards thing, just more of what would be compatible with a prebuilt HP computer.
August 11, 2010 10:29:42 AM

Er.... yeah. I would avoid HP computers like the plague. The motherboards can catch you out. Sometimes they dont fit the standard form factors, and often the BIOS is very limited or locked completely.

Not to say this is always the case, though, you may well be fine.

OK, I found this:

http://www3.shopping.com/xPO-Hewlett-Packard-HP-Pavilio...

According to this spec sheet, the motherboard DOES have a PCIexpress 16x slot, which means you will be able to put a new graphics card inside it.

Now I can't be sure as to how much room there is going to be inside the box for a Graphics card, but I would guess there will be room for a single slot graphics card.

You can either find a passive graphics card (one which draws up to 75watts via the motherboard, but does not require any other power connectors from the PSU), or you can find one which DOES require a connector from the PSU. You can bet your bottom dollar that the included PSU wont have a connector.
Luckily, PSU's tend to be fairly interchangeable. You could put something like this in it no problem:

http://www.ocztechnology.com/products/power-supplies/ma...

It would just be a case of unscrewing and unplugging the old PSU, and swapping it for the new one. It's fairly fool-proof. The only thing which might catch you out is if the PSU has a PCIe 8pin connector, this might look the same as an 8pin motherboard connector. So just watch out you dont get those mixed up!

Back to the Graphics Card:

I would recommend something like a Radeon 5670. This isn't a very powerful GPU, but it is almost on par with an 8800GT for power. It will let you play most games on medium settings at 1680x1050, or high settings at a lower resolution. Some games though, like Metro 2033 for example, you will be stuck on low/medium settings.
It will almost definately fit in your PC though, which would be my main worry.

If you look inside the PC and are confident that there is room for a dual slot graphics card (you need to see how much room there is between the CPU heat sink and the PCIexpress x16 slot, and how may empty slots there are at the back of the case in the right position) then you could possibly even get away with a Radeon 5770 or maybe even a GTX460. They will require a good 500watt PSU as a minimum really, with 1 6pin PCIe connector to power the 5770 or 2 of those to power the GTX460. I would seriously make sure there is room first. I would have my doubts that there is.
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August 11, 2010 10:33:43 AM

Also if you got a new case it would likely solve the problem BUT, a word of advice - make sure the motherboard fits the standard form factor. Sometimes these OEMs (HP or Dell for example) make unique parts like UPSIDE DOWN motherboards, which are often on the wrong side of the case, and wont fit in a standard case.
Examine the system first.
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a c 147 U Graphics card
August 11, 2010 12:13:00 PM

Consider:
1) Does a normal ATX PSU fit in the case? (If so, Corsair is a good bet. A 450W PSU or higher depending on the graphics card)

2) Your graphics card can be limited by your CPU

You may not play all the newest games at high settings but there are lots of games that run quiet nicely on medium cards like the HD5770 (Starcraft 2 etc. Run game DEMOS before buying if in doubt.)

example of hardware:
1) Corsair 450W
2) HD5770 1GB
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a b U Graphics card
August 11, 2010 1:44:25 PM

For that system I would use a hd5770 video card as its much shorter than most video cards and doesn't require a lot of power:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

And this power supply:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Corsair under rates their power supplies and this is equal to most other 500~550 watt psus.

Here's an article with someone that did the same thing you are wanting to do and what they encountered. Extra case fans may be a good idea. The hd5770 doesn't run so hot in my system so I don't know for sure you would have a heat problem but you may if you only have 1 case fan.

http://www.computerforums.org/showthread.php?p=1053250
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August 11, 2010 10:02:58 PM

RickyT23 said:
Also if you got a new case it would likely solve the problem BUT, a word of advice - make sure the motherboard fits the standard form factor. Sometimes these OEMs (HP or Dell for example) make unique parts like UPSIDE DOWN motherboards, which are often on the wrong side of the case, and wont fit in a standard case.
Examine the system first.


I looked up the motherboard for them and it seems they're exactly the same: http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01...

(Which is good since he has no idea whether it's 6510f or 6520f.

Is that one that would fit in a normal case?

I much rather change the entire case and replace it with one that comes with a power supply than just change the power supply. I have no experience in changing computer parts around and not enough confidence I can plug everything together right without frying something by accident. One of my relatives has an HP, the case doesn't seem very durable, she told me her power button broke so she has to use something to stab the computer on. :??: 
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a b U Graphics card
August 12, 2010 2:26:16 AM

The cases that come with a power supply have low quality power supplies most of the time and you are skipping out on the easiest part of the psu change, screwing it into the case. You will still have to route the wires and correctly connect them to all of the of the other components. The old case will be fine to use. If you really want to change the case then get one without a power supply and get the one I linked above. You will still have to connect everything if you replace the case and power supply or just the power supply so you're not saving yourself a headache by buying a case with a power supply.

Look at my post above and read the link I provided...

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August 14, 2010 7:23:40 AM

Best answer selected by Silver_Mud.
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a b U Graphics card
August 15, 2010 5:30:41 AM

Thank you sir. Let us know how it works out for you. Thats part of our reward for helping... =D
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