Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Wireless Internet Connection:What do I need?

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
Share
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 2:00:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Ok, so right now I've got three Desktops running Windows hooked up to a
wired router. I've got Broadband/Cable Internet. I was thinking about
getting an iBook. Partially to spite Bill Gates and parially because I
like the fact that I'm not being controlled by Microsoft. lol anyways,
I was wondering how to go about connecting to the internet on all of
them. It is not necessary that they are networked, but it is neccessary
that it is wireless. I've already eyed the wireless router I want from
D-Link, but what else do I need? Oh and the link to the product is:
http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=316. Thank you all, I just need to
know what the different things are that I need to buy.

-Zach
http://www.againsttcpa.com
December 31, 2004 4:14:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Well, a wireless access point will cost just as much as a wireless
router. And the router gives you more flexibility and function. It
seems like the AP should be less costly, but maybe the volume produced
gives the router a price edge.

jimbo
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 6:13:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Ok, so let me see if I get this. If I get a wireless router it will
still have ports where I can plug my ethernet cables in for all my
desktops. Then I can use the wireless feature for my iBook. Is this
information correct?

-Zach
http://www.againsttcpa.com
PS It is weird that the access points cost just as much as a router.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 6:14:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thank you so much. Let's start doing the math on Prices and which one
to get.
December 31, 2004 7:59:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Read the specs for the wireless router you are thinking about to be
sure, but, yes, most wireless routers have four wired ports in addition
to the wireless access point. And you have several options to configure
your network. You could keep your current wired router and leave the
three wired desktops connected. Then connect the new wireless router
LAN port to LAN port and use the wireless feature to connect your iBook
to the network. Or you could put your current wireless router into
retirement and connect the three desktop computers to the wired ports
and use the wireless AP to connect your iBook to the network. Or you
could use the new wireless router as the internet gateway and the
wireless AP to connect your IBook and connect your existing wired
router LAN port to LAN port and leave your existing three desktops
connected to the wired ports. Or you could.................well you get
the idea.

Good luck, jimbo
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 10:37:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Zach,

I have a similar set-up with the D-Link wireless router (1 windows desktop,
2 windows laptops and 1 iBook).

Your broadband connection goes into the router. You can continue connecting
the desktops to the router with ethernet, or you can buy a D-Link wireless
PCI card for each desktop you want to connect wirelessly. A wired
connection with ethernet will still be faster, more reliable where you can
do it. Buy the iBook with a wireless card installed and it will connect
more-or-less automatically to the D-Link router--hooking that up will be one
of the easier connections to make.



"Zach Flynn" <mog_zimri@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:wlhBd.12208$c%.3042@okepread05...
> Ok, so right now I've got three Desktops running Windows hooked up to a
> wired router. I've got Broadband/Cable Internet. I was thinking about
> getting an iBook. Partially to spite Bill Gates and parially because I
> like the fact that I'm not being controlled by Microsoft. lol anyways,
> I was wondering how to go about connecting to the internet on all of
> them. It is not necessary that they are networked, but it is neccessary
> that it is wireless. I've already eyed the wireless router I want from
> D-Link, but what else do I need? Oh and the link to the product is:
> http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=316. Thank you all, I just need to
> know what the different things are that I need to buy.
>
> -Zach
> http://www.againsttcpa.com
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 10:37:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

So this means that I can use the ethernet cables I already have to
connect all of my desktops to the router and then use the wireless
feature for just the iBook? Because if so, that would be awesome.

-Zach
http://www.againsttcpa.com

Joe Davis wrote:

> Zach,
>
> I have a similar set-up with the D-Link wireless router (1 windows desktop,
> 2 windows laptops and 1 iBook).
>
> Your broadband connection goes into the router. You can continue connecting
> the desktops to the router with ethernet, or you can buy a D-Link wireless
> PCI card for each desktop you want to connect wirelessly. A wired
> connection with ethernet will still be faster, more reliable where you can
> do it. Buy the iBook with a wireless card installed and it will connect
> more-or-less automatically to the D-Link router--hooking that up will be one
> of the easier connections to make.
>
>
>
> "Zach Flynn" <mog_zimri@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:wlhBd.12208$c%.3042@okepread05...
> > Ok, so right now I've got three Desktops running Windows hooked up to a
> > wired router. I've got Broadband/Cable Internet. I was thinking about
> > getting an iBook. Partially to spite Bill Gates and parially because I
> > like the fact that I'm not being controlled by Microsoft. lol anyways,
> > I was wondering how to go about connecting to the internet on all of
> > them. It is not necessary that they are networked, but it is neccessary
> > that it is wireless. I've already eyed the wireless router I want from
> > D-Link, but what else do I need? Oh and the link to the product is:
> > http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=316. Thank you all, I just need to
> > know what the different things are that I need to buy.
> >
> > -Zach
> > http://www.againsttcpa.com
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
December 31, 2004 10:37:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Zach,

Pardon me for breaking in.

I agree with your suggestion but since he already has a router and
modem, wouldn't a simple wireless access point also do the job less
expensively? I bit the bullet a few months ago a replaced my ISP
provided DSL modem and Belkin wired router with a Westell
Wireless/Router/DSL modem. It wasn't cheap and I sometimes wonder if I
should have just added an access point. Of course that would have
increased the clutter on the desk.


"Joe Davis" <davisexp@attglobal.net> wrote in message
news:fUhBd.13552$RH4.6427@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> Zach,
>
> I have a similar set-up with the D-Link wireless router (1 windows
> desktop, 2 windows laptops and 1 iBook).
>
> Your broadband connection goes into the router. You can continue
> connecting the desktops to the router with ethernet, or you can buy a
> D-Link wireless PCI card for each desktop you want to connect
> wirelessly. A wired connection with ethernet will still be faster,
> more reliable where you can do it. Buy the iBook with a wireless card
> installed and it will connect more-or-less automatically to the D-Link
> router--hooking that up will be one of the easier connections to make.
>
>
>
> "Zach Flynn" <mog_zimri@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:wlhBd.12208$c%.3042@okepread05...
>> Ok, so right now I've got three Desktops running Windows hooked up to
>> a
>> wired router. I've got Broadband/Cable Internet. I was thinking
>> about
>> getting an iBook. Partially to spite Bill Gates and parially because
>> I
>> like the fact that I'm not being controlled by Microsoft. lol
>> anyways,
>> I was wondering how to go about connecting to the internet on all of
>> them. It is not necessary that they are networked, but it is
>> neccessary
>> that it is wireless. I've already eyed the wireless router I want
>> from
>> D-Link, but what else do I need? Oh and the link to the product is:
>> http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=316. Thank you all, I just need
>> to
>> know what the different things are that I need to buy.
>>
>> -Zach
>> http://www.againsttcpa.com
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 1, 2005 2:09:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Zach Flynn" <mog_zimri@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:bwiBd.12215$c%.12112@okepread05...
> So this means that I can use the ethernet cables I already have to
> connect all of my desktops to the router and then use the wireless
> feature for just the iBook? Because if so, that would be awesome.

Yep.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 1, 2005 6:44:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Yes, that's correct. Most Wireless routers will have 4 ports for
"wired" Ethernet connection, and antennas for wireless connections.


Zach Flynn wrote:

>
> Ok, so let me see if I get this. If I get a wireless router it will
> still have ports where I can plug my ethernet cables in for all my
> desktops. Then I can use the wireless feature for my iBook. Is this
> information correct?
>
> -Zach
> http://www.againsttcpa.com
> PS It is weird that the access points cost just as much as a router.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 1, 2005 7:24:18 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Zach Flynn" <mog_zimri@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1104534789.898605.25440@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
>
> Ok, so let me see if I get this. If I get a wireless router it will
> still have ports where I can plug my ethernet cables in for all my
> desktops. Then I can use the wireless feature for my iBook. Is this
> information correct?
>
> -Zach
> http://www.againsttcpa.com
> PS It is weird that the access points cost just as much as a router.
>
Most do, even if there is only one you can hook that to your existing router
(assuming there is a port available).
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 2, 2005 6:09:46 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

what some companies call an access point, other companies call a router.
the terminology is not standard.


"Richard Johnson" <richj@remove.this.tairedd.com> wrote in message
news:cr7evq0ncv@news3.newsguy.com...
>
> "Zach Flynn" <mog_zimri@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1104534789.898605.25440@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>>
>>
>> Ok, so let me see if I get this. If I get a wireless router it will
>> still have ports where I can plug my ethernet cables in for all my
>> desktops. Then I can use the wireless feature for my iBook. Is this
>> information correct?
>>
>> -Zach
>> http://www.againsttcpa.com
>> PS It is weird that the access points cost just as much as a router.
>>
> Most do, even if there is only one you can hook that to your existing
> router
> (assuming there is a port available).
>
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 2, 2005 8:52:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I beg to differ. A "wireless acess point" is a very specific device. A
"wireless router" is a different specific device (which happens to
include [always] a wireless access point, a router and [almost always] a
switch].

You can buy WAP's, routers and switches separately, or you can buy a
"wireless router", which is almost always all 3 of them in one device,
and which has become almost the only way that they are commonly sold at
retail.


Joe Davis wrote:
> what some companies call an access point, other companies call a router.
> the terminology is not standard.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 2, 2005 7:14:55 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Thanks, Barry, you did a better job of explaining that than I did.

What I had run into was that Company A had a "wireless access point" with
the exact same features as company B's "wireless router", but company B's
"wireless access point" didn't have some of the features of their router.


"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:41D78E46.8060003@neo.rr.com...
>I beg to differ. A "wireless acess point" is a very specific device. A
>"wireless router" is a different specific device (which happens to include
>[always] a wireless access point, a router and [almost always] a switch].
>
> You can buy WAP's, routers and switches separately, or you can buy a
> "wireless router", which is almost always all 3 of them in one device, and
> which has become almost the only way that they are commonly sold at
> retail.
>
>
> Joe Davis wrote:
>> what some companies call an access point, other companies call a router.
>> the terminology is not standard.
>>
!