Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Hibernating Laptops

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
Share
January 1, 2005 11:33:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On my older laptop if i added more ram i had to recreate the save to disk
partition to compensate for the added ram. Is this still the case under Win
xp?

Thnaks
Bob

More about : hibernating laptops

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 1, 2005 11:44:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

In news:EODBd.18270$152.11940@trndny01 "Bob" <bobdawn1@verizon.net> wrote:

> On my older laptop if i added more ram i had to recreate the save to
> disk partition to compensate for the added ram. Is this still the case
> under Win xp?

Depends on how hibernate works on your machine. On both IBM ThinkPads I've
had, the hiberation file is written to the main (user) partition. The old
machine ran Win98SE, the current one runs WinXP Pro, and I saw no
difference.

If you've got yours set up to go to its own partition, then it makes sense
to think you'll have to make sure it's big enough to hold the resulting
hibernation file.

--
Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN bert@visi.com
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 2, 2005 2:24:09 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Bert Hyman wrote:
> In news:EODBd.18270$152.11940@trndny01 "Bob" <bobdawn1@verizon.net>
> wrote:
>
>> On my older laptop if i added more ram i had to recreate the save to
>> disk partition to compensate for the added ram. Is this still the
>> case under Win xp?
>
> Depends on how hibernate works on your machine. On both IBM ThinkPads
> I've had, the hiberation file is written to the main (user)
> partition. The old machine ran Win98SE, the current one runs WinXP
> Pro, and I saw no difference.
>
> If you've got yours set up to go to its own partition, then it makes
> sense to think you'll have to make sure it's big enough to hold the
> resulting hibernation file.

I'm a little unclear as to exactly what happens when you hibernate a
laptop--as opposed to a complete shutdown.

Is the only difference the hibernate file is written to disk so that you
restart in the same state as when you initiated the hibernation? Is it
otherwise the same as shutdown, in that no battery drain occurs...hd,
memory, screen, mb resources all drawing no power? If so, why would anyone
go to the trouble of completely shutting down, as long as all is well with
apps, etc?

My Gateway M305 hibernates as quickly as it shuts down, but it takes much
longer to restart from scratch--especially if numerous apps must be
reopened. I'm not being difficult here...just looking for elucidation.

jak
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 2, 2005 9:51:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

jakdedert wrote:

> Bert Hyman wrote:
>
>>In news:EODBd.18270$152.11940@trndny01 "Bob" <bobdawn1@verizon.net>
>>wrote:
>>
snip
>
> I'm a little unclear as to exactly what happens when you hibernate a
> laptop--as opposed to a complete shutdown.
>
> Is the only difference the hibernate file is written to disk so that you
> restart in the same state as when you initiated the hibernation?

snip

As the risk of over simplifying, I would say that the above is correct:
the machine totally shuts down (as it does normally) but save its
initial state to a specific file whose size is depending upon the amount
of RAM installed. When it resumes, instead of going through the usual
boot up process, the system restores the system as it was, reading from
the file that was saved. This is normally faster than booting up
normally and reopening the opened applications. If this is not the case,
I suspect some thing is wrong but what, I do not have a clue this early
in the morning ...

--
John Doue
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 2, 2005 5:14:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Defined in the manufacturer datasheets are three types of
shutdown. The conventional shutdown where all data is written
to disk and the next startup acts as if it might be a
different hardware configuration. 'Sleep to disk' where the
current configuration (including both hardware and open
programs) are copied to disk - and then power is completely
removed. On powerup, the computer is restored from where it
left off - programs need not go through an initialization
startup. 'Sleep to Ram' where the data for all programs
remains in memory and only enough power is supplied to memory
to maintain data in memory. On power up, 'sleep to Ram'
starts up similar to 'sleep to disk'. But a lost of power
would mean loss of data in that sleep.

Not all manufacturers have demonstrated reliable 'sleep'
conditions. Some third party hardware hinders the 'sleep'
operations. There may be some cases where hibernation just
does not work or is not reliable. Just another reasons why
hardware provided by the original manufacturer may be
preferred.

jakdedert wrote:
> I'm a little unclear as to exactly what happens when you hibernate a
> laptop--as opposed to a complete shutdown.
>
> Is the only difference the hibernate file is written to disk so that
> you restart in the same state as when you initiated the hibernation?
> Is it otherwise the same as shutdown, in that no battery drain
> occurs...hd, memory, screen, mb resources all drawing no power? If
> so, why would anyone go to the trouble of completely shutting down,
> as long as all is well with apps, etc?
>
> My Gateway M305 hibernates as quickly as it shuts down, but it takes
> much longer to restart from scratch--especially if numerous apps must
> be reopened. I'm not being difficult here...just looking for
> elucidation.
>
> jak
January 2, 2005 7:09:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

90% of the time I hibernate. Its much faster than the usual start and
shutdown and it puts you back to where you left off. I have never had any
issues with doing this.

Bob


"John Doue" <notwobe@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:qRMBd.12$HO2.9@read3.inet.fi...
> jakdedert wrote:
>
>> Bert Hyman wrote:
>>
>>>In news:EODBd.18270$152.11940@trndny01 "Bob" <bobdawn1@verizon.net>
>>>wrote:
>>>
> snip
>>
>> I'm a little unclear as to exactly what happens when you hibernate a
>> laptop--as opposed to a complete shutdown.
>>
>> Is the only difference the hibernate file is written to disk so that you
>> restart in the same state as when you initiated the hibernation?
>
> snip
>
> As the risk of over simplifying, I would say that the above is correct:
> the machine totally shuts down (as it does normally) but save its initial
> state to a specific file whose size is depending upon the amount of RAM
> installed. When it resumes, instead of going through the usual boot up
> process, the system restores the system as it was, reading from the file
> that was saved. This is normally faster than booting up normally and
> reopening the opened applications. If this is not the case, I suspect some
> thing is wrong but what, I do not have a clue this early in the morning
> ...
>
> --
> John Doue
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 2, 2005 7:09:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Bob" <bobdawn1@verizon.net> wrote:
>90% of the time I hibernate. Its much faster than the usual start and
>shutdown and it puts you back to where you left off. I have never had any
>issues with doing this.

I usually find that after a few cycles of hibernation I need a
complete reboot to get everything working again. It frequently takes
longer to recover from hibernation than a reboot would have taken,
though of course a reboot doesn't save your system state.

Dell Latitude D600, WinXPsp1, 512M, WiFi & LAN ports used in varying
configurations, FWIW.
January 2, 2005 8:48:23 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

This is assuming your not making any changes to the system. If you are then
hibernating would not work and you need to reboot.

Bob


<William P.N. Smith> wrote in message
news:989gt0hick8srkq9k72sn66c14se3d7kqv@4ax.com...
> "Bob" <bobdawn1@verizon.net> wrote:
>>90% of the time I hibernate. Its much faster than the usual start and
>>shutdown and it puts you back to where you left off. I have never had any
>>issues with doing this.
>
> I usually find that after a few cycles of hibernation I need a
> complete reboot to get everything working again. It frequently takes
> longer to recover from hibernation than a reboot would have taken,
> though of course a reboot doesn't save your system state.
>
> Dell Latitude D600, WinXPsp1, 512M, WiFi & LAN ports used in varying
> configurations, FWIW.
>
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 3, 2005 3:37:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

w_tom <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote:
[hibernation]
>programs need not go through an initialization
>startup.

Actually, there may be a significant amount of initialization
required. Any hardware that has had it's power removed may need
configuration, and any networking states will need to be reset. This
is especially significant with WiFi, as security keys and other such
things will have to be exchanged to bring the network back up.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
January 3, 2005 11:44:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Therefore you are saying the Operating System must
initialize but programs do not. Or hardware must be
initialized and then the OS is restored from where it left
off. Either way, programs need not initialize which is why
booting can be faster. And again, this is why some hardware,
improperly designed, does not hibernate well.

William, P.N., Smith wrote:
> w_tom <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote:
> [hibernation]
>> programs need not go through an initialization startup.
>
> Actually, there may be a significant amount of initialization
> required. Any hardware that has had it's power removed may need
> configuration, and any networking states will need to be reset. This
> is especially significant with WiFi, as security keys and other such
> things will have to be exchanged to bring the network back up.
!