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Isn't ssd a bit overrated?

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January 4, 2013 12:24:46 PM

So my new home build computer has a 120 GB ssd drive as the main drive and I've hooked up a fairly old SATA drive as my secondary drive.

As much as I'm enjoying the really quick startup to windows (12 seconds) I really can't tell much difference between the games that I'm playing are installed on my main drive or secondary drive. I was told that the games would load MUCH quicker on the SSD drive but to be honest I can't tell much difference. I have tested this with games like Far Cry 3, Skyrim and Batman Arkham City.

The reason why I ask is because I'm going to buy a new harddisk but I much rather have alot more space for my money instead of cutting like 2 seconds of my loading time in games and settle with far less space.

Is SSD drives really only for enthusiasts?

More about : ssd bit overrated

January 4, 2013 12:38:04 PM

I love my SSD. It makes everything so snappy in comparison to a HD. It helps load times in BF3 quite a bit. What most do though is have an SSD as the OS drive and install a second hard drive for other "stuff" like photos, music and maybe even games.


EDIT: Most game loads are highly sequential so SSD's don't make a huge difference albeit SSD's are faster.
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January 4, 2013 12:53:51 PM

During some SSD testing we moved my wife's PC, she is not very geeky, from a spindle drive to a pure SSD solution. Never told her we did it. After a day or so she made a passing comment that the system seemed faster but never really fussed about it in any way. After two weeks I pulled the SSD and out her back to a spindle drive. Within 4 hours I was being nagged to look at her system how it was suddenly so slow.

As for your need for space, do you need it, really? On my blog I did a piece about the hoarding mentality in computer use today when it comes to HD space needs. You might be surprised how little you really need.
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a c 353 G Storage
January 4, 2013 12:57:18 PM

My wife is FAR from being a computer enthusiasts, Her Biggest complaint was the Boot time which was greatly reduced by using an SSD.
For me Boot time was an smaller issue; However, I now have an SSD in all my systems (2 Laptops and two desktops) and would never go back to a Mechanical HDD for OS + Programs. A side issue for me is that the reliability of Consummer HDD is NOT the greatest. Enterprise HDD have a much better reliability factor, but are also much more expensive. Currently have some 13 SSDs one dating back to Intel's G1 and Have yet to have one fail.

With Windows 7 a Back-up of the "small" SSD is simple and quick. Should I ever need to re-install widows 7 (WHICH I've done several times), I can do it from this image file and be back up and running with in 15 Min with the system exactly as it was when I created the image.
With a HDD, I must use two, one internal and a Back-up external to protect all my generated files/Data.
In my two desktops ad one of my Laptops I use two SSDs, One for OS + Programs and One for Most often used files/data.
For laptops it also decrease average power consumption thus giving a slight increase in "on battery" time.

But you are correct as to performance, The SSD will ONLY improve reads and writes to the SSD. It Does NOT increase performance of a running program, nor increase FPS in games, nor improve email/web surffing.

So Yes to some extent it is all in the eye of the beholder.

The Majority of thoes who have switched to an SSD for OS + Programs share my view - NEVER going back to a HDD for OS + Programs.
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January 4, 2013 1:21:52 PM

Yes, an SSD makes a huge difference. If you really need the space then look out for a hybrid drive.

Normal hard drives are so slow that they're a joke.
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a b G Storage
January 4, 2013 1:53:06 PM

+1 ssd does a difference
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January 4, 2013 2:07:16 PM

Do SSDs make a difference?: Heck yes!

Do they make a difference in games?: Not much, if at all.
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January 4, 2013 2:10:12 PM

Computered said:
During some SSD testing we moved my wife's PC, she is not very geeky, from a spindle drive to a pure SSD solution. Never told her we did it. After a day or so she made a passing comment that the system seemed faster but never really fussed about it in any way. After two weeks I pulled the SSD and out her back to a spindle drive. Within 4 hours I was being nagged to look at her system how it was suddenly so slow.

As for your need for space, do you need it, really? On my blog I did a piece about the hoarding mentality in computer use today when it comes to HD space needs. You might be surprised how little you really need.

Just had to say I love this and will be doing the same very soon! My fiance is not a computer enthusiast at all but is constantly bringing me her lappy to work on. Can't wait to see the results :D .
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January 4, 2013 2:11:08 PM

rene13cross said:
Do SSDs make a difference?: Heck yes!

Do they make a difference in games?: Not much, if at all.


Depends on the game really. In most ... No... But games like KO. Where there is a load screen for every portal you take. Makes a HUGE difference.
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January 4, 2013 2:18:40 PM

The majority of people who consider SSD's to be overkill are using systems that came with an SSD. Dare you to replace the SSD with a spindle.
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January 4, 2013 3:14:18 PM

Alright so we can all agree that the main drive should be a ssd. Thinking about it I would never go back to install my os on a normal drive. But I'm still not really convienced that my "game/video drive" should be ssd, which people are also implying in this thread because I do tend to use alot of storage. Games are pretty big these data;).
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a b G Storage
January 4, 2013 3:21:48 PM

Mahisse said:
Alright so we can all agree that the main drive should be a ssd. Thinking about it I would never go back to install my os on a normal drive. But I'm still not really convienced that my "game/video drive" should be ssd, which people are also implying in this thread because I do tend to use alot of storage. Games are pretty big these data;).



SSD's overrated, no I think not.
In any modern system, the harddrive is the bottleneck. Mechanical drives are still painfully slow compared to the rest of the system. Games are written with this in mind, so most information is loaded into memory, which takes a little bit, an SSD will speed this up, but its really a very small part of the gaming experience, so SSD's don't do a lot for gaming, per say. What they do is make the system feel much faster overall, for everyday things, opening programs, reading emails, boot time, installs, updates, etc. This part is quite noticeable and makes SSD's well worth the price, I think.
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a c 353 G Storage
January 4, 2013 3:28:11 PM

Data/files (ie video) are normally stored on a HDD as they can be quite large. Also the are Sequencial files Vs majority of files on OS + Program tend to be small and stored random (Which is whre a SSD REALY shines).

Game maps - This depends on size of SSD. With the cost of 256 gig SSDs droping this is not so much of a problem. Paid $180 each for a 256 Gig Crucial M4 and a 256 Gig Samsung 830
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January 4, 2013 3:30:15 PM

ummmmm YES(YES SSD = WORTH IT). though, i did research before i bought mine, and my guess if you just use the blanket title "SSD" that there are slow SSDs out there so.
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a c 353 G Storage
January 4, 2013 3:42:31 PM

^ Yes there are some "slower" SSD among the Newer SSDs.
Typically they are the 120 gig Sandforce controller drives that use Asynchronous NAND chips ie anyone say Agility III.
HOWEVER, while they may be slower than say the 128 gig Marvel or 128 gig Samsung Controller based SSDs (ie Crucial M4 and samsung 830/840s they are still WAY FASTER than a Mechanical HDD. The Best HDD will have an access speed of around 9 mSec (typical is 12 mSEC) while even the slowest SSD is typically measured in the tenths of a mSec.
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January 4, 2013 4:50:00 PM

Try using a 5400 rpm drive and I think you will answer your own question.
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January 4, 2013 5:08:43 PM

Best answer selected by mahisse.
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a c 125 G Storage
January 4, 2013 5:50:03 PM

SSD's impact on a PC falls primarily into 2 categories:

1. Benchmarks - If you want to prove you have the "fastest PC on the block" you'll need a SSD to give you the benchmark results you will need to stake your claim.

2. Subjective performance - When you are paying attention, the quick boot times do make the PC feel snappier. Here's some results from Son No. 2's PC (Asus P8P67 WS Revolution, I7-2600 @ 4.8 Ghz, 16 GB CAS 7 DDR3-1600, twin 560 Ti w/ 25% OC.

Boot time w/ Seagate Barracuda XT HD - 21.1 seconds
Boot time w/ Seagate Moments Hybrid SSD/ HD - 16.6 seconds
Boot time w/Mushkin Chronos Deluxe SSD - 15.6 seconds

Note: The Chronos is listed as a "3rd Tier" (fastest category for 120 GB* models) SSD here:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ssd-recommendation-...

* New Plextor M3 Pro and Samsung 840 Pro are 128 GB Tier 1 models

MMO Load / Connection time w/ Seagate Barracuda XT HD - 45.5 seconds
MMO Load / Connection time w/ Seagate Moments Hybrid SSD/ HD - 45.5 seconds
MMO Load / Connection time w/Mushkin Chronos Deluxe SSD - 45.5 seconds

If you are going to make a case to your boss however that adding an SSD will improve office productivity, you're going to lose.

Whether you add one to your system will much depend on your availability of funds. If money no object, by all means get one. I have put SSD's in most of the builds I have done over the last two years. My problem is, even with 120 GB models, the majority of users keep coming back to asking me "clean them up" as they run out of room. An astute windows user won't find this to be too much trouble but the time spent doing it adds up.

Given my experience w/ the Momentus (750GB) however, I'd be hard pressed to tell whether a box had a SSD or a Momentus 750 in it without using benchmarks.

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

I'm real interested to see the next generation of the Moments and have to agree with storagereview.com .....

http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

Quote:
Seagate has come a long way with the Momentus series, and the benchmarks show a maturity in hybrid technology. Judging by the pace of development, it won't be long before the Momentus XT matches SSD performance in every task - not just what's cached. I'll agree that 8GB is a solid start, but eventually this SSD cache will need to grow beyond 32GB to really achieve what solid state drives can already do.


And the bonus is ...... no worries about configuring windows, moving default file storage locations, space limitations whatever.

In conclusion, if you have no budget worries by all means include one in your build. If using highly storage dependent specialty apps such as video editing in a production (read money making) environment, again by all means get one (or more)

If budget is an issue, it's likely the money could be better spent on other components. If you use a hybrid drive like the Moments XT 750, you won't find yaself longing one.

And at $120, the cost savings is certainly easy to take

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$10 off w/ promo code EMCNJNF67, ends 1/6
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