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ASUS P8Z68 V-Pro

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August 17, 2011 10:56:20 PM

Possible PSU problem, leaning towards motherboard, but the PSU was working on a different hardware setup not 45 mins before.

Just built this machine using the P8Z68 V-Pro MB. Went to power it on and I get an audible click from the PSU and the fans move ever so slightly, like they got just a sip of power and than it sits there like an anchor.

I got power indicators on the MB lit up and yes, both the 24 pin and 8 pin power connectors for the MB are plugged in.

I stripped the PC totally down so I had just CPU and RAM installed and it does the same thing. Any one come across this same problem before or anyone have suggestions?

More about : asus p8z68 pro

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a c 716 V Motherboard
August 17, 2011 11:36:21 PM

Welcome to Tom's Forum! :) 

Q - What PSU?
Q - What if any GPU?

This could easily be a short, unscrew all of the MOBO & PCIe screws and dangle the MOBO away from anything conductive and supported by a towel - try again. Failure, pull the USB headers.
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August 17, 2011 11:40:11 PM

PSU is a 700 Watt that I am re-using from my Alienware PC. Not sure on the make.

GPU's were 2x GTX 570's. But I took these out to see if it was them causing the problem..... It does the same thing.

I'm going to go ahead and take it completely out of the case and see if it still does the same thing.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
August 17, 2011 11:48:52 PM

Yeah a full breadboard is the easiest, use (1) stick - failure swap sticks.

You are WAY under powered especially if the 'plan' is to OC anything, and you may have damaged the PSU.

IMO - OC both the CPU + GPU(s) then at least a 1000W if not 1200W PSU.
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a c 216 V Motherboard
August 17, 2011 11:53:15 PM

If the motherboard works outside of the case ...

Are there any extra standoffs on the motherboard tray that don't exactly correspond to a mounting hole on the motherboard itself? If there are any extra ones they need to be removed or they will cause an electrical short and cause the symptom you've described.

Also check that the system panel connectors from the chassis is connected properly to the Q-Connector.
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August 18, 2011 12:07:37 AM

I am not sure that this is still the case, but in the past Dell power supplies were incompatible with non-Dell motherboards. Dell now owns Alienware. I would try to test the board with another power supply.
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August 18, 2011 2:22:23 AM

jaquith said:
Yeah a full breadboard is the easiest, use (1) stick - failure swap sticks.

You are WAY under powered especially if the 'plan' is to OC anything, and you may have damaged the PSU.

IMO - OC both the CPU + GPU(s) then at least a 1000W if not 1200W PSU.



Yeah, originally I thought the PSU was 1KW, but upon checking it after all this happened it was rated at 700W 30Amp Max. I have since then ordered a 1KW PSU.

Your concerns are my own about damaging the PSU, but I will try everything out of the chasis first before I write the PSU off as a loss.

Quote:
I am not sure that this is still the case, but in the past Dell power supplies were incompatible with non-Dell motherboards. Dell now owns Alienware. I would try to test the board with another power supply.


Are you sure about this? I wouldn't think a PSU with all the correct connectors would be prejudice against one MB or another.

Quote:
If the motherboard works outside of the case ...

Are there any extra standoffs on the motherboard tray that don't exactly correspond to a mounting hole on the motherboard itself? If there are any extra ones they need to be removed or they will cause an electrical short and cause the symptom you've described.

Also check that the system panel connectors from the chassis is connected properly to the Q-Connector.


The standoffs used were not changed/moved from what the old MB (eVGA 680i SLI) used. And no extra ones were used.

I also thought of the Q-Connector as well, so I unplugged everything from it and used the power switch built into the MB to no avail.





Here's what I did as far as the new build.

I had an old Alienware case from about 5 years back (one of the newer styles as seen here)

I re-used my 2x 750GB WD Caviar Blacks
700W PSU
DVD Burner
Case
SoundBlaster Xi-Fi Sound Card

I ordered new:
Intel i7 2600k Processor
ASUS P8Z68 V-Pro Mobo
4x4GB Corsair Vengeance 1600 DDR3
eVGA Geforce GTX570 x2

Recieved all the necessary parts this morning. I was playing Bad Company 2 at the time when it came so I know the old PSU was good. Powered down the PC, disassembled it, put the new stuff in (painstakingly made everything as neat or neater than it was before) powered it on, heard the audible "click" of the PSU and saw the case fans and CPU fan move just barely then did nothing afterward. I proceded to start trouble shooting as posted above before I had to leave for work.

Now that I've had ample time to pick some peoples brains and think back on it, I have some new trouble shooting processes to take.
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a c 216 V Motherboard
August 18, 2011 4:06:24 AM

Screed said:
The standoffs used were not changed/moved from what the old MB (eVGA 680i SLI) used. And no extra ones were used.

The EVGA nForce 680i SLI Motherboard used 10 standoffs. I remember I had to remove an extra standoff located where the expansion slots are when I upgraded my system from an EVGA nForce 780i SLI motherboard to an ASUS P8Z68-V PRO just last week.

The ASUS P8Z68-V PRO only uses 9 standoffs.

The extra one is shown here in the EVGA nForce 680i SLI Motherboard image with the red circle I placed around it:

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August 18, 2011 3:08:13 PM

Ok, so I stripped it completely down with just the processor. Took it out of the case and laid in on top of a piece of card board that it came in. Did the same thing....

So I decided to eliminate the chance that I blew the PSU when I had it all hooked up and tried to power it on for the first time. I hooked all the old componants back together plugged it in and it does the same thing. So at least I know it's the PSU that is the problem.

I ordered a 1KW PSU yesterday. I will update when I get it.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
August 18, 2011 4:39:27 PM

You're forgetting if you PSU went kablooey so could ANYTHING it's attached to.

If you are using an aftermarket HSF then try the OEM, if the HSF has any metal <-> MOBO contact this 'can' cause a short ie post failure.
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August 20, 2011 4:21:35 PM

Sooo, uhh yeah..... I got the new PSU in. Hooked it up and gave it a test before i plugged everything in. Everything seemed to look good. Proceded to hook everything up. Plugged it in and powered it on........ Shear panic as I watched sparks come out and smoke billowing out of the PSU.

I literally almost cried. After being completely torn apart mentally I stripped it down completely. What I found was interesting to say the least. A wire for the case fan seems to have caused the problem. It melted throught the casing and welded itself to the molex connector it was attached to. I decided to do away with it for the time being and plugged the machine back in (I figured at this point if it hadn't already fried everything than it isn't going to) powered it on............................it booted up.

I have since re-loaded windows and updated everything on it. I'm definately not done with the PC as of yet, but at least I know all the hardware is functional and un damaged.

I'm still going to RMA the PSU b/c I don't know what kind of damage was done to it, and I'm still curious on why this particular case fan caused the catastrophic melt down on this particular circuit.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
August 20, 2011 5:42:13 PM

I agree with @ko888 comments of standoff's and it could be a metal HSF plates <+> MOBO top or bottom causing a dead short. Until the 'short' is found you can add 50 PSU's with the same fireworks display. ** SO FAR you've been lucky! **

The standoffs MUST all line up and extras removed.

Use plastic washers on top of the standoffs, use silicone to affix {hold} in place.
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August 31, 2011 8:16:00 PM

Ok so problem solved. It WAS a short, but not the standoff's or HSF Plates. The short was actually coming from a case fan who's wires got pinched between the case and itself.

So all is good now, nothing major was damaged, and everything is working like it should now.
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