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Boot up speed

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January 7, 2013 1:15:12 PM

Hello all. Below are my system informations. I have two sata hard disc and a seagate extreme external for back up. Should I buy an SSD for my OS to speed up boot time? Thanks.

OS Name Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium
Version 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601
Other OS Description Not Available
OS Manufacturer Microsoft Corporation
System Name CARL-PC
System Manufacturer Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd.
System Model P43-ES3G
System Type x64-based PC
Processor Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz, 3000 Mhz, 1 Core(s), 2 Logical Processor(s)
BIOS Version/Date Award Software International, Inc. F14, 8/23/2010
SMBIOS Version 2.4
Windows Directory C:\Windows
System Directory C:\Windows\system32
Boot Device \Device\HarddiskVolume1
Locale United States
Hardware Abstraction Layer Version = "6.1.7601.17514"
User Name #####
Time Zone Eastern Standard Time
Installed Physical Memory (RAM) 10.0 GB
Total Physical Memory 10.0 GB
Available Physical Memory 8.39 GB
Total Virtual Memory 26.0 GB
Available Virtual Memory 24.4 GB
Page File Space 16.0 GB
Page File C:\pagefile.sys

More about : boot speed

a b G Storage
January 7, 2013 2:26:55 PM

ssd is a good option or you could run your existing drives in raid 5
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a c 129 G Storage
January 7, 2013 3:08:02 PM

take a look at the total boot time of your system. there two parts to boot time on a pc. the bios boot time from the time you power on the system till the hard drive toss up the windows splash logo. and the time windows take to get to the tile/start screen. do an informal test go into your bios and turn on quick boot and turn off the mb splash screen. see how much time you can shave from your mb bios boot. newer efi motherboards and windows eight boot up in 12 sec. (with a ssd).
ssd will speed up windows load time and aps loading load time. but for the best money to speed the ssd should be on a 6g sata port.
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a c 170 G Storage
January 7, 2013 3:56:15 PM

I would not buy a SSD just to speed up boot times.

But, I WOULD buy a SSD for a general performance improvement.
Everything you do will seem so much quicker.

Buy a SSD large enough for your most used apps and data.
Nothing less than 120gb.

And... instead on shutting down and rebooting, I suggest you use sleep to the S3 state(sleep to ram-no hibernation)
It is a very low power state, almost as little as a complete shut down.
That will taks only a couple of seconds to sleep or wake.
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a b G Storage
January 7, 2013 5:14:08 PM

You cannot run 2 internal drives in Raid 5, it takes a minimum of 3 drives. It would not be recommended to add the external drive to make a raid 5 of 3 drives as the entire array will be limited by the extremely slow external drive.

As well as raid 5 will have worse write times than any individual drive as well as no increase in read speeds.

A raid 0 with your two internal drives will speed up read and write speeds of the OS slightly at the expense of reliability (not recommended if you do not have a very good back up solution already in place). A raid 1 of your 2 internal drives may speed up read speeds for larger files and will increase the reliability of your data but all of that is at the expense of space (you will only get half the space of the 2 drives combined).

By far the easiest and my personal solution is to buy an SSD. If you only want your OS and a select few programs on it then 64GB is plenty of space. However with how cheap SSDs are becoming there is not much of a point to buy anything less than 120GB drives right now.
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January 8, 2013 4:24:02 AM

Just wondering, would it speed up my boot time if I disconnect my external HD and just plug it back in to do a backup? I have the two internal hard drives because I did run raid 0 stripped? But then I had A CRASH WITH NO backup. I don't know what the extra internal drive is functioning as now. Is it reading and writing the same as my C drive or is it doing nothing? As you can tell I am behind the curve on drive functions, partitions etc. I have plenty of room in my tower to expand.
How about the new cache SSD that Crutial is pushing now??
And thanks for your responses.
Carl
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Best solution

a b G Storage
January 8, 2013 10:43:31 AM

Delete everything in:
- C:\Windows\Prefetch\.
- C:\Windows\Prefetch\ReadyBoot\.

Slap this in your StartUp group and let it run to completion.
- http://scottdbowen.id.au/PreCacher/PreCacher_v1105_80KB...

Restart three times to retrain the Windows ReadyBoot/ReadyBoost/Prefetch, etc.

I'd then recommend using IObit Smart Defrag, and set-up a Boot-time de-fragmentation of your PageFile, MFT, etc.
- If you get really stuck on this message me.
- http://www.iobit.com/iobitsmartdefrag.html
- Your pagefile, MFT, etc. cannot defragmented while the OS is loaded and has locked the files.

I would also suggest shrinking your pagefile from 16GB and letting it grow dynamically from between 4GB and 16GB instead.
- Anything over 4GB wastes some resources used to track it, which leads to a noticeable performance hit.

You're PC should start feeling like it has an SSD without the purchase!

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a c 170 G Storage
January 8, 2013 1:39:17 PM

osteoart said:
Just wondering, would it speed up my boot time if I disconnect my external HD and just plug it back in to do a backup? I have the two internal hard drives because I did run raid 0 stripped? But then I had A CRASH WITH NO backup. I don't know what the extra internal drive is functioning as now. Is it reading and writing the same as my C drive or is it doing nothing? As you can tell I am behind the curve on drive functions, partitions etc. I have plenty of room in my tower to expand.
How about the new cache SSD that Crutial is pushing now??
And thanks for your responses.
Carl


1. I would keep my external backup drive disconnected, or at least powered off regardless. That is to protect it from a virus or electrical damage.
Connect it only when you do a backup. I do not think the drive will affect your boot times, either way.

2. The performance value of raid-0 is much overstated. Synthetic sequential benchmarks do look good, but in real life, there is no benefit to normal desktop operations.
One reason is that 90% of what the os does is small random I/O. That is what a SSD does 50x faster.

3. Crucial is OK as a SSD. I think it is behind Intel and samsung for reliability. From a performance point of view, ignore the benchmarks. All modern SSD's will perform about the same in actual use. ...FAST. Read this on component return rates:
http://www.behardware.com/articles/881-7/components-ret...
A SSD will slow down as it gets filled. Buy one large enough in the first place. 120gb at least.
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January 8, 2013 7:07:13 PM

Scott_D_Bowen said:
Delete everything in:
- C:\Windows\Prefetch\.
- C:\Windows\Prefetch\ReadyBoot\.

Slap this in your StartUp group and let it run to completion.
- http://scottdbowen.id.au/PreCacher/PreCacher_v1105_80KB...

Restart three times to retrain the Windows ReadyBoot/ReadyBoost/Prefetch, etc.

I'd then recommend using IObit Smart Defrag, and set-up a Boot-time de-fragmentation of your PageFile, MFT, etc.
- If you get really stuck on this message me.
- http://www.iobit.com/iobitsmartdefrag.html
- Your pagefile, MFT, etc. cannot defragmented while the OS is loaded and has locked the files.

I would also suggest shrinking your pagefile from 16GB and letting it grow dynamically from between 4GB and 16GB instead.
- Anything over 4GB wastes some resources used to track it, which leads to a noticeable performance hit.

You're PC should start feeling like it has an SSD without the purchase!


Thanks Scott, but how does one slap something into StartUp. Did you write this code? Has it been successful in windows 7 64 bit?
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January 8, 2013 7:11:11 PM

Thanks Scott, but how does one slap something into StartUp. Did you write this code? Has it been successful in windows 7 64 bit?
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January 9, 2013 2:36:31 PM

Best answer selected by osteoart.
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