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Core i7 950 and AS 5

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December 26, 2010 2:03:29 AM

Installed it last night and I've had the computer on and off for awhile for a few times now(yes I know it takes much longer than that for optimum temperatures but anyways I was wondering whether or not I should reapply if the idling temperatures are around 44 degrees Celsius?

I've always wondered if I do it exactly right because last night I was around 35 degrees Celsius idle temps but now it's back up(room temperature is about the same).

I'm currently using the http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... with the fan at max speed.

More about : core 950

a c 159 à CPUs
December 26, 2010 12:34:48 PM

No. 44 is excellent for any heatsink. Those 950's run warm. Your load temp can reach 70c sometimes, but don't worry about it. They never run as cool as older dual core cpus.
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December 26, 2010 1:35:19 PM

Load temps are more important than idle, whats the temp under load like?
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December 31, 2010 11:06:19 PM

I've ran it for a few more days and they seem to be anywhere from 45-55 depending on my room temp.. I posted a new topic with suggestions on other heatsink/fan combos because I'd like it to run cooler and don't mind spending more($60 budget) if you guys' have any suggestions that'd be great
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January 1, 2011 3:17:54 AM

45/55*C seems a little high to me for idle temps. They are only supposed to run at 67.5*C max design temps. You can run them higher of course but it starts to degrade the life expectancy (MTBF). One of the most recommended cpu coolers is the Hyper 212 Plus FOUND HERE for $38 with shipping and I would add THIS SECOND FAN for only $14 more. The combination works great at keeping the temps down. One of the biggest things to keep into account though is the ambient room temperature. No air cooler works well in a warm room.
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January 1, 2011 3:29:30 AM

suteck said:
45/55*C seems a little high to me for idle temps. They are only supposed to run at 67.5*C max design temps. You can run them higher of course but it starts to degrade the life expectancy (MTBF). One of the most recommended cpu coolers is the Hyper 212 Plus FOUND HERE for $38 with shipping and I would add THIS SECOND FAN for only $14 more. The combination works great at keeping the temps down. One of the biggest things to keep into account though is the ambient room temperature. No air cooler works well in a warm room.


Actually, that 67C max temp is for the overall cpu (mainly the casing) than the cores.

The cores them selves have a different tempature max and thats 100C for the core i7's. Although most peoples goals are to keep the CPU cores a Max of 70c or lower. (You will find some people on these forums that there core i7's will run into the 80c range under load (a lot of times with overclocking) and they've had these cpu's sense practically the core i7's came out.)
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January 1, 2011 2:30:40 PM

Quote:
The cores them selves have a different tempature max and thats 100C for the core i7's.
Can you show me where there's some documentation on that? I know people will run them at the higher temps but they aren't going to last as long as people's who don't. Mine have run into those higher temps during overclocking trials and trying to find a good cpu cooler in the beginning. But not anymore because I want them to last. I'm only giving what I have found, (from Intel), to be specs that will allow OP's chip to last. If you can show me where you get the 110*C from I will remember to at least point that out if the source looks reliable, and add that as well. Why would Intel mention the case temps but not core temps if the cores are what matter?
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January 1, 2011 3:46:05 PM

suteck said:
Quote:
The cores them selves have a different tempature max and thats 100C for the core i7's.
Can you show me where there's some documentation on that? I know people will run them at the higher temps but they aren't going to last as long as people's who don't. Mine have run into those higher temps during overclocking trials and trying to find a good cpu cooler in the beginning. But not anymore because I want them to last. I'm only giving what I have found, (from Intel), to be specs that will allow OP's chip to last. If you can show me where you get the 110*C from I will remember to at least point that out if the source looks reliable, and add that as well. Why would Intel mention the case temps but not core temps if the cores are what matter?


Well, i dont have any direct sources ATM as i haven't had a need to use them in a every long while , i do still have an old post from December of 2009 when i started learned about this myself.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/272282-28-warm#t20307...

As you see, randomizer educated me on that. ;) 

As for core limits, It the TJmax that you see in temp programs like coretemp and realtemp. Every core i7 i know of has a limit of 100c.

As for why Intel doesn't recommend max core temps? Idk. I been wondering that as well since.
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a b à CPUs
January 1, 2011 4:40:02 PM

Same reason high powered psu's are recommended by Nvidia and ATI, to cover themselves.
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January 1, 2011 7:25:07 PM

warmon6 said:
Actually, that 67C max temp is for the overall cpu (mainly the casing) than the cores.

The cores them selves have a different tempature max and thats 100C for the core i7's. Although most peoples goals are to keep the CPU cores a Max of 70c or lower. (You will find some people on these forums that there core i7's will run into the 80c range under load (a lot of times with overclocking) and they've had these cpu's sense practically the core i7's came out.)

I dont understand what you are saying is the covering of the cpu in otherwords the packaging of the dies or the chassis?
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