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Is a heat sink that necessary?

Last response: in CPUs
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December 26, 2010 6:42:08 PM

It looks like there's barely anyone who uses the stock cooling equipment given with the CPU as the heat sink.Now,I understand that when overclocking,you need better coolers,but without for non-overclockers,is the "default" cooler enough,or would you still recommend getting a more advanced cooler?

Thanks

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a b à CPUs
December 26, 2010 6:52:25 PM

If your not going to overclock then just use the stock fan. In some cases people buy aftermarket heatsinks just to run more quiet. Personally I wouldn't unless overclocking.
December 26, 2010 6:54:20 PM

I don't overlock my Athlon II X2 250, but I bought a Xigmatic cooler anyway - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The heatsink is good enough alone where I can passively cool the CPU with just the case fans, reducing noise a bit without the need of keeping the CPU fan on. Passively cooled, my CPU temps are the same as the stock AMD heatsink+fan; with the fan turned on, the Xigmatic heatsink+fan reduces temps by 13C...pretty nice if I need to overclock in the future.

So, if you want an ultra-quiet PC, I'd recommend getting an aftermarket Heatsink for passive cooling.
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December 26, 2010 6:55:47 PM

They put the stock cooler to get rid of some plastic, copper and aluminum. :) )

The stock heat sink it there to work for stock CPU speed. You can buy a better cooler to reduce your temps but only if you want to.
I used the stock cooler even when overclocking at my core 2 duo. I bought a new one when i increased my overclock to keep the temps under control.

If your temps are in the right margins for that CPU then no need for a better cooler.

Sometimes the CPU heats up because of no airflow inside the case, dust inside the case or bad thermal paste. In those cases you need to get a better case or make ventilation holes, clean the dust or reapply the thermal paste.

a b à CPUs
December 26, 2010 6:58:39 PM

Yes for absolute silent operation you'll need a good case with decent airflow and an aftermarket fan.
December 26, 2010 7:03:49 PM

Pijoto said:
I don't overlock my Athlon II X2 250, but I bought a Xigmatic cooler anyway - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The heatsink is good enough alone where I can passively cool the CPU with just the case fans, reducing noise a bit without the need of keeping the CPU fan on. Passively cooled, my CPU temps are the same as the stock AMD heatsink+fan; with the fan turned on, the Xigmatic heatsink+fan reduces temps by 13C...pretty nice if I need to overclock in the future.

So, if you want an ultra-quiet PC, I'd recommend getting an aftermarket Heatsink for passive cooling.



I don't have much knowledge in this topic,in fact I've just started looking at the extra coolers,so let me ask this:

How does it passively cool the CPU?Does that heatsink not have a fan,or do you turn it on/off?
December 26, 2010 9:29:05 PM

The heatsink comes with a fan, but I just don't have it on. My computer already has two case fans, and that's enough to keep the CPU temps down, since the heatsink is huge and the fins are spread out.
a b à CPUs
December 26, 2010 11:26:25 PM

Unless you know EXACTLY what you are doing, and
you have all of the correct engineering data in front of you,
I would NOT recommend passive coolers for any CPUs.

The question of noise emitted by the heatsink/fan ("HSF") assembly
really doesn't become an issue unless the fan is unusually loud,
chiefly because that HSF assembly is enclosed after a case's side panels
are installed.

If you are contemplating an Intel CPU, then you should understand
this WARNING because of what it confirms about the problems
many Intel customers have had with the "push-pins" on
the stock Intel HSF for LGA sockets (775, 1156 and 1366 pins):

http://www.supremelaw.org/systems/heatsinks/warning.htm


If a passive CPU cooler is not chosen carefully and integrated well
with the overall air flow inside a chassis, all current Intel CPUs
will either throttle the FSB multiplier, to "downclock" the CPU,
or it will just shut down, to prevent damage from overheating.

I tried this just once, to see how quickly the CPU would shut down:
without any heatsink whatsoever, it doesn't take very long
for an Intel CPU to shut down, because of the heat that it
generates, even when it is idling.

A simple solution like this $5 part solves a lot of problems,
many of which are caused by the defective push-pins on
Intel's stock HSF units:

http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/lgbowiscsp.html

Just plan ahead, because many cases do not have an opening
directly below the CPU socket, and the motherboard will need
to be removed in order to install the all important backing plate.

BEST WAY is to install the backing plate BEFORE the motherboard
is ever installed in the case. So, plan ahead before you "Leap Ahead" :) 


MRFS
!