Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Post-use backup?

Last response: in Systems
Share
September 29, 2010 7:55:55 PM

I built my computer a few months ago, installed Windows 7 Ultimate, and went about my daily business, completely forgetting to back up the drive. I now have 300 gb of space used up, and would like to back up just the Windows files and Microsoft Office, I can reinstall my games if it goes under, but the Windows 7 has a 1 time install just like Office.

I want to transfer Windows 7 over to an SSD that I want to buy soon (160 GB), and I want to back up my system, is there any possible way I can do that? Or would I need to completely wipe my harddrive before that would be possible?

More about : post backup

a b B Homebuilt system
a b $ Windows 7
September 29, 2010 8:33:26 PM

You could uninstall all your stuff but there would still be a bunch of stragglers. My suggestion, based upon what you are saying, would be to wait until you actually buy the SSD and then do as follows.

1. Disconnect HD cable.
2. Install Win7 to SSD
3. Run Windoze Update till it says "no mas"
4. Reconnect HD cable.
5. Delete Windows Directory
6. Delete all individual files on root
7. Delete Drivers and Temp directory; delete program directories
8. Look thru Documents and Settings to see what you wanna save, delete everything else.
9. Defrag
10. Reinstall all programs

Though if it was me, I'd:

1. Move what I wanted to keep to external HD or Thumb Drive
2. Disconnect HD cable.
2. Install Win7 to SSD
3. Run Windoze Update till it says "no mas"
4. Reconnect HD cable.
5. Format and partition HD


m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
September 29, 2010 8:37:31 PM

Well another option would to be to buy or borrow an external drive, throw everything important onto that and do jack's second option.

Much faster and less annoying.
m
0
l
Related resources
September 29, 2010 8:47:10 PM

Thanks for the responses. I have a 1.5 TB external, I could throw my files onto there. However, Windows 7 Ultimate came with 1 activation, if I install it onto the SSD, would it still work as a genuine copy?
m
0
l
October 1, 2010 7:53:14 AM

im wondering that same question.
m
0
l
October 1, 2010 2:13:48 PM

Apparently no one knows the answer. I don't wanna get an SSD and not be able to install Windows on it...
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
October 6, 2010 8:17:36 PM

I assume you have the OEM version?

Win installation is linked to a mobo not the HD. In addition, if your mobo breaks, you can call up MS and let them know, they'll usually let you register the code to a new mobo.
m
0
l
October 7, 2010 12:20:52 AM

banthracis said:
I assume you have the OEM version?

Win installation is linked to a mobo not the HD. In addition, if your mobo breaks, you can call up MS and let them know, they'll usually let you register the code to a new mobo.


I don't have the OEM version, I think, I bought it at a student discount. Is it still linked to the motherboard?

Really? I didn't know that. So I can uninstall it and reinstall Windows 7 as much as I want as long as I keep the motherboard in this computer?
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
October 7, 2010 2:18:33 AM

There is no student version for ultimate.

Student version for pro and premium is full retail, can be used as many times as you want.
m
0
l
October 9, 2010 2:19:12 PM

Any idea if that disc will reinstall just fine on an SSD?
m
0
l

Best solution

a b B Homebuilt system
a b $ Windows 7
October 9, 2010 2:27:39 PM

Upgrade media has the same EULA as full retail media. As long as you are running the OS on one computer, the license is transferable. You should have zero problems reinstalling on the same hardware (SSD is the only change).
Share
October 9, 2010 6:56:25 PM

rwpritchett said:
Upgrade media has the same EULA as full retail media. As long as you are running the OS on one computer, the license is transferable. You should have zero problems reinstalling on the same hardware (SSD is the only change).


Thank you.
m
0
l
October 9, 2010 6:56:35 PM

Best answer selected by whoisme555.
m
0
l
!