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December 26, 2010 10:32:40 PM

Hello, new comer here! I need some help in answering some questions! :) 

I am gone start off with my build :

MSi 770-G45 AMD770 Chipset

Athlon X4 630 2.8GHZ (Overclocked to 3.36GHZ at stock voltage) AM3

G.Skill RipJaws 4GB (2X2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)

SAMSUNG Spinpoint 320GB 7200 RPM 16MB cache

EVGA GeForce 450GTS 1GB DDR5 (Apparently factory overclocked to 822Mhz, I then boosted the core clock to 905Mhz)

APEVIA 500W Power Supply

Rosewill Challenger XT Case with 2x120mm fans(front,rear), 1x140mm fan(top). (I also added a 120mm on the side panel and already ordered another fan, same kind from APEVIA, the blue LED one.

Additional info: Well, I bought Dynex thermal compound from Best Buy, and I thought It would be better then the stock compound, and apparently, idling temperature increased by 2-3C which I know isn't a lot but it made me feel dumb. :lol:  Maybe I put too much of it, not that it matters as I'm planning to put Arctic Silver on it anyway, was just a test.

1.SO I guess my question is, how much thermal compound is enough?

2.Second is I have been getting BSOD after overclocking my CPU, and I did not even do it manually,which is the part that makes me angry... :p  I used the Easy OC Switch on my motherboard going from 2.8 Ghz to 3.36Ghz. Why am I getting BSOD? It only happens when I game for an hour or two at most. Is it too much of an overclock?

Stats/Specs etc.: http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p189/adriangolec/des...

3.Also more of a case heat dispersion question. The front fan blows air in. The rear fan blows air out. The top fan blows air out. And so does the one on the side. Should one of them do the opposite? And if I add that extra fan I ordered on the side, should it blow air in or out? P.S. If I install that particular fan that I ordered on the side, it's gone be located right across from the CPU heat-sink as well as the North Bridge heat-sink, therefore it's either gone blow air on those two, or blow the air out of the area around those two.

To help you understand: http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p189/adriangolec/com...

Please help! :) 

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a b à CPUs
December 26, 2010 10:48:35 PM

Easy OC switch sounds great in theory, but, you might also be boosting mem effective speeds beyond what your RAM is capable of, certainly at stock supplied RAM voltage....
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December 26, 2010 10:50:19 PM

So you think I shouldn't use the Easy OC Switch and just OC it myself through software etc? And if so, what's a good program to do so?
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December 26, 2010 11:58:09 PM

Also how do I get my memory to run at 1600mhz instead of 1333mhz?
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a c 131 à CPUs
December 27, 2010 12:08:04 AM

recktech said:
So you think I shouldn't use the Easy OC Switch and just OC it myself through software etc? And if so, what's a good program to do so?

No. I think you should test for stability using programs like prime95 etc. Just because there is an easy OC setting doesn't mean that will be stable. I could never get my Athlon IIx4 stable past 3.2GHz.
I had it at 3.3GHz. Tested stability with prime95 and it was fine 12 hours.
Tested with linx, failed the first test. So I lowered it to 3.25GHz
was fine with linx but every once in a while folding work units would have issues and suddenly my system would display funny colours. So I lowered it to 3.2GHz and everything was fine. All on stock voltage. Increasing the voltage even to 1.5V made no difference with the chip I had.

Just because there is an easy overclocking button in the bios does not mean you shouldn't read overclocking manuals and still use them in your overclocking endevours.

just OC it myself through software etc?
Don't use software. Do it in the bios. Change the FSB frequency and lower your ram multiplier if needed.
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December 27, 2010 12:12:43 AM

enzo matrix said:
No. I think you should test for stability using programs like prime95 etc. Just because there is an easy OC setting doesn't mean that will be stable. I could never get my Athlon IIx4 stable past 3.2GHz.
I had it at 3.3GHz. Tested stability with prime95 and it was fine 12 hours.
Tested with linx, failed the first test. So I lowered it to 3.25GHz
was fine with linx but every once in a while folding work units would have issues and suddenly my system would display funny colours. So I lowered it to 3.2GHz and everything was fine. All on stock voltage. Increasing the voltage even to 1.5V made no difference with the chip I had.

Just because there is an easy overclocking button in the bios does not mean you shouldn't read overclocking manuals and still use them in your overclocking endevours.

just OC it myself through software etc?
Don't use software. Do it in the bios. Change the FSB frequency and lower your ram multiplier if needed.

See that's what I don't understand. What's the relationship between FSB frequency and ram multiplier? How do I know when to lower the ram multiplier?
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a c 131 à CPUs
December 27, 2010 12:26:21 AM

recktech said:
See that's what I don't understand. What's the relationship between FSB frequency and ram multiplier? How do I know when to lower the ram multiplier?

The FSB speed is 200MHz stock on AMD motherboards. The FSB speed is the base clock for a lot of things in your system:
CPU Frequency = FSB x CPU multiplier
HT frequency = FSB x HT multiplier
ram frequency = FSB x ram multiplier
Then there are also some bus frequencies that rely on the FSB and their own multiplier also.
The ram is especially prone to become unstable. Usually a good idea is to lower everything so that only the CPU frequency will go above the default when you up the FSB. Find the stable CPU frequency, then work on the other parts.

1. Overclock experimenting as above.
2. Test for stability. Prime95 for 12 hours. Then linx for 8 hours. then try running a few SMP folding@home units for a couple days. I recommend this but most people find running prime95 for 24 hours to be stable enough for them. For me, I've had folding@home issues and had to lower my overclocks even after those tests.
3. lower the overclock OR up the CPU voltage to try to find a stable overclock if one of the tests fail.

This is where the overclocking guides come in. Unless someone here is willing to walk you through every detail of overclocking:
http://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=...

http://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=...

http://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=...
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December 27, 2010 12:38:53 AM

enzo matrix said:
The FSB speed is 200MHz stock on AMD motherboards. The FSB speed is the base clock for a lot of things in your system:
CPU Frequency = FSB x CPU multiplier
HT frequency = FSB x HT multiplier
ram frequency = FSB x ram multiplier
Then there are also some bus frequencies that rely on the FSB and their own multiplier also.
The ram is especially prone to become unstable. Usually a good idea is to lower everything so that only the CPU frequency will go above the default when you up the FSB. Find the stable CPU frequency, then work on the other parts.

1. Overclock experimenting as above.
2. Test for stability. Prime95 for 12 hours. Then linx for 8 hours. then try running a few SMP folding@home units for a couple days. I recommend this but most people find running prime95 for 24 hours to be stable enough for them. For me, I've had folding@home issues and had to lower my overclocks even after those tests.
3. lower the overclock OR up the CPU voltage to try to find a stable overclock if one of the tests fail.

This is where the overclocking guides come in. Unless someone here is willing to walk you through every detail of overclocking:
http://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=...

http://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=...

http://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=...

Thanks a lot will do, and ill report on what happens.
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December 27, 2010 12:39:25 AM

Quote:
Its your psu. That thing is made by Rosewill aka youngyear Electronics. They cant make psus. That psu melted in all the tests at 50 percent load. bin it before you burn your house down get a better one

PSU is actually made by APEVIA. It's been working fine so far though
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a b à CPUs
December 27, 2010 3:37:59 AM

Let's say you could do better.
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December 27, 2010 4:41:36 AM

amdfangirl said:
Let's say you could do better.

What do you mean?
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a b à CPUs
December 27, 2010 4:45:12 AM

There are better more reliable power supplies out there.
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December 27, 2010 5:02:32 AM

I know. I didnt buy it. I got it from a friend who was building a PC as well, and ordered a case as well as power supply, little did he know that the case came with a power supply so he just gave it to me.
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a b à CPUs
December 27, 2010 5:11:04 AM

Fair enough, but cheap power supplies can be the root of problems later on.
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December 27, 2010 5:18:35 AM

Yeah or so I've heard. So far no problems. Hopefully that will continue. I am looking to replace it down the road. I'm hoping it's gone last 2 months or so. :) 
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Best solution

a c 111 à CPUs
December 27, 2010 11:59:45 AM

recktech said:
See that's what I don't understand. What's the relationship between FSB frequency and ram multiplier? How do I know when to lower the ram multiplier?


Interesting how it works out .... start with:

stock system clock -- 200MHz

In your case setting RAMs at 800/1600MHz is 8x200MHz

If you wish to OC and keep your RAMs at spec speed, your sweet spot is 240MHz clock with your divider at 667:

6.67x240MHz = 1600MHz RAMs --- See how that worked?


I'm thinking your OC tool had something like this in mind EXCEPT it defaulted to 5.33x240MHz and your RAMs are running at 1279MHz.

Did I guess right? :lol: 

Otherwise, your HT Link speed is too high --- drop the multi to 8x/1600MHz. Keep it around 2000MHz for best overall performance.

With AMD there are other sweet spots with the clock/RAMs. At 250MHz it is ddr1333. Drop from 667 to 533, and 5.33x250MHz = 1333MHz RAMs. Things any more clear, now?

In your case there is another sweet spot: 300MHz at 533. Don't know much about that motherboard but MSI has other stuff that can do it. The 'Cell Menu' in the BIOS has got some good tweaking options, too.

And as Mr Matrix advised, a much more stable and consistent OC may be achieved through the BIOS.

Something like this should work just dandy:


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December 27, 2010 3:10:40 PM

Wisecracker said:
Interesting how it works out .... start with:

stock system clock -- 200MHz

In your case setting RAMs at 800/1600MHz is 8x200MHz

If you wish to OC and keep your RAMs at spec speed, your sweet spot is 240MHz clock with your divider at 667:

6.67x240MHz = 1600MHz RAMs --- See how that worked?


I'm thinking your OC tool had something like this in mind EXCEPT it defaulted to 5.33x240MHz and your RAMs are running at 1279MHz.

Did I guess right? :lol: 

Otherwise, your HT Link speed is too high --- drop the multi to 8x/1600MHz. Keep it around 2000MHz for best overall performance.

With AMD there are other sweet spots with the clock/RAMs. At 250MHz it is ddr1333. Drop from 667 to 533, and 5.33x250MHz = 1333MHz RAMs. Things any more clear, now?

In your case there is another sweet spot: 300MHz at 533. Don't know much about that motherboard but MSI has other stuff that can do it. The 'Cell Menu' in the BIOS has got some good tweaking options, too.

And as Mr Matrix advised, a much more stable and consistent OC may be achieved through the BIOS.

Something like this should work just dandy:

http://i716.photobucket.com/albums/ww165/Back_at_the_Ranch/AMD%20Overlords/Asus/PhII945_wTIM.jpg

That helped so MUCH! :) 
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December 27, 2010 3:13:33 PM

Best answer selected by recktech.
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December 27, 2010 3:43:54 PM

That's not the one I got! lol I hope it's not that bad either! Also I set my system clock at 240mhz, set the HT speed multiplier at X9, giving me 1920mhz for HT, also set my ram ratio (apparently that's the samething as the multiplier) to 3:10 (FSB : DRAM)
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December 27, 2010 3:49:37 PM

Forgot to mention that I am running Orthos Stress Test right now (small FFTs) and the temperature is between 59-63C. Fluctuates between there. Is that good?
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December 27, 2010 4:17:21 PM

Quote:
go to that site and pull up the review. Rosewell are the original OEM and their components are cheap. Those psus are the same they just remove a bridge or two then sell it off as a smaller model or otherway around

yeah your cpu wont be stressed like that during normal usage. try to get it down a tat

do you have a HTT option in your bios. not the HT the HTT

No I do not and i made a mistake my HT multiplier is X9 and it comes out to 2160mhz.
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a c 111 à CPUs
December 27, 2010 8:14:54 PM

recktech said:
That's not the one I got! lol I hope it's not that bad either! Also I set my system clock at 240mhz, set the HT speed multiplier at X9, giving me 1920mhz for HT, also set my ram ratio (apparently that's the samething as the multiplier) to 3:10 (FSB : DRAM)


recktech said:
Forgot to mention that I am running Orthos Stress Test right now (small FFTs) and the temperature is between 59-63C. Fluctuates between there. Is that good?


recktech said:
No I do not and i made a mistake my HT multiplier is X9 and it comes out to 2160mhz.


Your HT is fine. 9x240MHz = 2160HT :) 

Hard to say with your temps. I suspect you could drop the volts back -0.125v and that would cool things off a bit. You are within shouting distance of the maximum temps (71c). Max volts to spec is 1.4v. Hopefully we can get you down to 1.35-1.375v or so.

Is your DRAM Freq at 800MHz, now? Is your NB Freq at 2400MHz?
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December 27, 2010 8:57:55 PM

Wisecracker said:
Your HT is fine. 9x240MHz = 2160HT :) 

Hard to say with your temps. I suspect you could drop the volts back -0.125v and that would cool things off a bit. You are within shouting distance of the maximum temps (71c). Max volts to spec is 1.4v. Hopefully we can get you down to 1.35-1.375v or so.

Is your DRAM Freq at 800MHz, now? Is your NB Freq at 2400MHz?

Correct for both. 800mhz and 2400mhz. :) 
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