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$1500 budget gaming system

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September 30, 2010 9:05:13 AM


Introduction (can be skipped): It took me 3 months to decide on the parts of my computer back in 2007 using this forum as my only source of help and resources. The results were GREAT thanks to the community, I am so grateful for that. Now, I want to create a new computer within one month (so I have 1-2 weeks basically to make the research and 1-2 weeks for delivery and assembly).


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Approximate Purchase Date: 1-4 weeks

Budget Range: $1500

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming (MMORPGs), Surfing the Net, Watching Movies, Infrequent image editing for my websites.

Parts Not Required: Keyboard, Mouse, and Monitor.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Amazon.com (last time I checked, I couldn't buy from newegg.com because I live in Kuwait)

Country of Origin: Kuwait

Parts Preferences: I prefer Intel Processor. N'Vidia Graphic Cards. Ausus Motherboard. I am interested in SSD drive as my booting drive. I prefer single Graphic Card (instead of SLI). I liked the Corsair PSU 620w that was recommended 3 years ago (that recommendation was spot on!).

Overclocking: No

SLI or Crossfire: No

Monitor Resolution: 1600x1050 (However, I am willing to buy a new monitor outside of the budget and might use a higher resolution).

Additional Comments: I will buy Windows 7 64bit (but this is outside of the budget). I like to invest on my Motherboard, PSU, Case and RAM because these are the core. I don't want something TOO expensive. Just something of high quality and does the work. I am not an "enthusiast" which means I don't care about that extra 2fps that would cost me $500 extra. I just care about the core 40-60fps on high resolution and smooth performance. Pushing extra 5 fps don't matter to me.

Also, if it's worth it I'm willing to expand my budget an extra $500 for a needed value. I don't want to regret and say "ahh if I paid extra, I wouldn't have had this problem." :) 

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September 30, 2010 1:33:26 PM

Given your current resolution and other factors i wouldn't spend this kind of $$ but i shall elaborate

1. Its all socket change time
Given majority games aren't even quad optimised any small fortune u dump into a platform now will be rapidly obsolete with both AMD/Intel moving on as soon as end of this year even and only the former having current AM3 chips forward compatible with next gen AM3+ chipsets

2. On the GPU front
Again AMD HD 6000 looming along with Nvidia Fermi's successor, Kepler means bigger better tech on the horizon

3. Personal (you) factor
Quote:
I am not an "enthusiast" which means I don't care about that extra 2fps that would cost me $500 extra. I just care about the core 40-60fps on high resolution and smooth performance.


I would think you dun even turn on AA/AF and so again no need to splash that much for your needs
October 1, 2010 12:16:56 PM

batuchka said:
Given your current resolution and other factors i wouldn't spend this kind of $$ but i shall elaborate

1. Its all socket change time
Given majority games aren't even quad optimised any small fortune u dump into a platform now will be rapidly obsolete with both AMD/Intel moving on as soon as end of this year even and only the former having current AM3 chips forward compatible with next gen AM3+ chipsets

2. On the GPU front
Again AMD HD 6000 looming along with Nvidia Fermi's successor, Kepler means bigger better tech on the horizon

3. Personal (you) factor
Quote:
I am not an "enthusiast" which means I don't care about that extra 2fps that would cost me $500 extra. I just care about the core 40-60fps on high resolution and smooth performance.


I would think you dun even turn on AA/AF and so again no need to splash that much for your needs


Hi,

Thank you for replying.

I still need help with how to start building a new computer though, I would appreciate it.


and just in case I failed to explain.. I do turn AA/AF on but I don't need to use 34 AA just like some gamer was bragging about, that's beyond my need (8 AA is fine, depends on what game we're talking about). I don't have to explain the given. Of course I want the highest setting possible/reasonable at the highest FPS possible/reasonable/noticeable... but I don't want to spend $500 just to be able to run 30 AA or just to push my FPS by 2 which I wouldn't notice. I hope that makes sense.

The reason why I say that is because the sticky build list two things. Either Budget Gaming Computers or Best gaming computers. I want something in the middle. All my experience belong to 2007 so I find it extremely hard to learn what's the best in the market and what I need. This community helped me build my BEST gaming machine back in 2007 and I built exactly what I needed and I was very satisfied.
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October 1, 2010 2:32:04 PM

Here's a base system for a little under $950 before rebates:

CPU: Intel Core i5-760 BX80605I5760 ~$210
MOBO: Asus P7P55D-E ~$140
RAM: G. Skill Eco Series 4GB DDR3 1600 F3-12800CL7D-4GBECO ~$96
GPU: EVGA 01G-P3-1373-AR GeForce GTX 460 ~$230
HDD: Samsung Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 1TB ~$75
ODD: Lite-On DVD Burner SATA iHAS124-04 ~$17
PSU: Corsair CMPSU-650TX 650W ~$70
Case: Antec Three Hundred ~$60

The SSD is really based on your preference and how much space you want. You can't go wrong with any SandForce SF-1200 based SSD. Check out the link for more info. Just make sure the SSD has TRIM support.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/windows-7-ssd-trim,...

Some SSD recommendations:
SSD: Crucial RealSSD C300 128GB CTFDDAC128MAG-1G1 ~$270
SSD: OCZ Vertex 2 60GB OCZSSD2-2VTXE60G ~$125
SSD: Intel X25-M Mainstream 80GB SSDSA2M080G201 ~$200
October 1, 2010 2:51:43 PM

Actually, the budget Intel build is what I consider the same as a high end Intel build for gaming (i7 is extra money for nothing) the alterations you will likely want to make are a better GPU (though I think one build had 2 x GTX 460 which is pretty damn awesome), a better motherboard and possibly a more powerful PSU.

One of the best gaming builds to go for in my opinion is:
i5 760 CPU
Asus P7P55D E Pro motherboard
4gb 1600mhz CL 7 RAM (G Skill is my preference)
650 - 850W Corsair or XFX PSU (Recommend no less than 750W if using GTX 470 or Radeon 5870 as 650W will not manage a second one added in future)
HAF 922 case
Samsung Spinpoint F3 500gb or 1TB Hard Drive
Any $20 DVD drive
optional CPU Cooler if OCing

That will come in comfortably within your budget. That will be about $800, less with combo deals from Newegg. That leaves plenty for a GPU. For a GPU I would be looking at either a GTX460 1gb with the intention of SLIing a second (which you could do immediately within your budget). A GTX470, or an Radeon 5870.

Due to playing MMOs and them often getting little benefit from 2 card set ups, my preference would be for the GTX 470 or Radeon 5870. Nvidia tend to be better with DirectX11 so the GTX 470 may be a better choice - also, if you play games which in the future can use 2 cards, Nvidia tend to get better results in two card set ups.

The GTX 470 will cost about $300. That takes your total to $1100. For $200-250 you can get a 24 inch monitor with 1920 x 1080 resolution which would take your total to $1350. You can then get Windows 7 for $100.

So, this gaming build can get you everything including the items that you were going to buy outside your budget. This would be all the gaming power you need for quite some time, with the option of adding a second card in the future to ensure you last about 5 years.

You also may want to consider Overclocking your CPU, not just because the i5 760 is great for it, but because you play MMOs and they are very CPU intensive and a boost to the speed of your CPU can make significant difference. I wouldn't go for an extreme Overclock, but you can easily get the i5 760 to about 3.5ghz

An alternative option is to add an SSD into the build, that is up to you, if you can afford it then by all means do so. It helps with loading times but in terms of actual gaming performance it doesn't do anything, so I personally tend not to use them as they are too expensive.

!