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Making a gaming computer suggestion

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December 28, 2010 10:04:36 AM

So my computer specs are:
* Motherboard: Gigabyte EP45-DS4P
* CPU: Core 2 Duo. 3Ghz / 6mb / 1333FSB
* Memory: 2x2GB Kingston DDR2 800Mhz
* Graphic card: Gigabyte Geforce 9500GT 1GB overclock 650MHZ
* 550W power supply

correct me if I'm wrong:
[cpu]
ghz is how fast it can process infomation?
mb is how much memory it can store for running multiple task?
then what about FSB then?
number of cores in cpu depends how many times it seperate the task?

above relates to memory also?

[motherboard]
i think my motherboard is sufficient atm. as i only am running ddr2, sata2, usb2.0?
what makes a good mother board?

[graphics card]
besides mb/gb, ghz....i don'y understand the finer details of the specs
what makes a good graphics card?

any suggestion on which part I need to upgrade in my computers to optimize gaming. I want it to be optimize without the extra stuff that i won't be needing. eg...too much speed, too much memory etc....

i don't want to pay something that i will never actually fully make use of

a b U Graphics card
a b V Motherboard
a b } Memory
December 28, 2010 10:20:01 AM

Your first move should be a new graphics card to be honest, either a ati 5770 or an nvidia 450/460 would go well in your current set up
As to your questions,
Yes Gigahertz iz the speed measure of your processor, 3.0Ghz is better/faster than 2.6 for instance, however two cores runnning at 2.6 would be better than one core running at 3, the 6Mb referred to is the chips onboard cache, basically its ram built into the chip which is accessed faster, theres plenty of life left in your duo yet, dont worry unless you want to play the most uptodate games at top settings
4Gb of ram is plenty atm for gaming needs and most applications
and your mobo's fine, ddr2 isn't dead tech just yet its still very popular even as the new ddr3 becomes more easily acessible
graphics cards clockspeed is basically what you want to look at, your 9500GT is overclocked to 650MHz, a more recent card like the Sapphire 5770 is standard at 850 and can overclock to 960 easily,
I recommend you to do a little searching into the cards I suggested as they would give you a great boost for reasonable cost,and wont be 'overkill' by any means depending on the age of your system a new powersupply may well be in order too,
check pc websites in your locale for deals on parts/cards though
Moto
December 28, 2010 12:03:26 PM

ok thanks. with RAM is it better to have a ddr2 ram stick that has more memory or more speed?

i've concluded that my motherboard and cpu are staying. though was thinking of getting new memory with same memory capacity though at faster speed. do you think is it neccessary? cause some people say that my 2x2GB ddr2 800 is sufficient. though i want to make my computer as fast as possible
December 28, 2010 1:06:51 PM

myfunkychannel said:
So my computer specs are:
* Motherboard: Gigabyte EP45-DS4P
* CPU: Core 2 Duo. 3Ghz / 6mb / 1333FSB
* Memory: 2x2GB Kingston DDR2 800Mhz
* Graphic card: Gigabyte Geforce 9500GT 1GB overclock 650MHZ
* 550W power supply

correct me if I'm wrong:
[cpu]
ghz is how fast it can process infomation?
mb is how much memory it can store for running multiple task?
then what about FSB then?
number of cores in cpu depends how many times it seperate the task?

above relates to memory also?

[motherboard]
i think my motherboard is sufficient atm. as i only am running ddr2, sata2, usb2.0?
what makes a good mother board?

[graphics card]
besides mb/gb, ghz....i don'y understand the finer details of the specs
what makes a good graphics card?

any suggestion on which part I need to upgrade in my computers to optimize gaming. I want it to be optimize without the extra stuff that i won't be needing. eg...too much speed, too much memory etc....

i don't want to pay something that i will never actually fully make use of


CPU:
GHz - A measurement of how many times per second a processor can complete an operation. Some procs can perform multiple operations per clock cycle though, and other factors come into play (32-bit vs 64-bit, hyperthreading, etc). So, don't use this number as your go-to, end all number in measuring processor performance. GHz means billions of cycles per second.

MB (Cache) - There are several stages that information goes through before it is processed. It is first stored in permanent storage such as a hard disk or flash drive. When an application starts, it then pulls the information that it will access most frequently into RAM (random access memory). When the processor demands information from the RAM, it then queues instructions in it's cache. This cache is extremely high-speed, low density data storage designed to optimize the efficiency of the processor by maintaining a queue of instructions waiting to go before the processor uses it. There are also several layers of chaching, but stick with one that has an L2 or L3 cache. L3 is preferrable.

FSB - FSB stands for Front Side Bus, an aging technology which is being phased out by Intel's QPI (Quick Path Interconnect). A Front Side Bus is also known as a memory controller, and plays host to the interface (bus) between the RAM and the processor. It is responsible primarily for making sure that commands are queued up to the processor and that the processor's cache is being used as efficiently as possible. FSB speed is measured in MHz, generally. The higher this number, the faster that you can run the FSB. The FSB is a feature located in what's known as your motherboard's northbridge, the chip located directly below the processor. Most Core 2 Duos are capable of anywhere between a 800MHz and 1333 MHz FSB Speed, although overclocking would allow for greater speed (provided that your RAM also supports the increase).

Core(s) - A processor core is effectively a single processing unit. They take advantage of a technology known as "parallel computing" which allows the processor to do several things at one time (aka - Multi-Threading). A task is usually comprised of several smaller tasks (threads) that can be manipulated to run simultaneously without affecting program function (and even optimizing it if coded correctly). Dual core processors are still noteworthy, but quad core processors are becoming more of a mainstream technology with the advent of Intel's Core iX series and AMD's bargain quad and hex cores.

Memory:
Frequency - A measurement of the maximum FSB frequency that the memory can support. This directly affects memory performance and reliability. The higher the number (provided that the RAM is stable at that speed), the better. RAM usually has a rated speed that it's capable of.

CAS (and others) Latency - This is a measurement of how many clock cycles that it takes for RAM to select a piece of data. RAM is divided into columns and rows, and the time that it takes to select data is a very crucial part of performance. The lower these measurements, the better. CAS latency (Column Address Strobe) is a generally-used measurement for overall performance, but all latencies should be taken into account.

Channel - A memory channel is effectively a "pipe" for data. Dual channel memory has two channels to pipe data to the FSB with, and triple channel has three. The more channels, the better, but you must first make sure that both your processor AND motherboard support the amount of channels you intend to run.

Graphics:
Shader Units - Also known as CUDA cores, etc (depending on how the manufacturer wants to portray them for marketing purposes) it is effectively the same thing as a processor core for your GPU. The more, the better.

Memory - There are several types of memory put into graphics cards these days. Memory in graphics cards is used for what's known as "frame buffering", which is a fancy way of saying that it is a cache for images that will be displayed on the monitor before they go out. This memory also stores other information such as texture data, etc, but it's primary purpose is frame buffering. The size of memory on a card does not indicate the overall performance of the card. You'll want to take into account the amount of shader cores, clock speeds, etc instead. There are different speeds of memory that go onto the card however, and these do have an impact on performance. DDR memory is the lowest performing, whilst GDDR5 is the current standard (I think). GDDR memory is memory specifically designed for graphics applications. It runs at higher clock speeds and has greater bandwidth than standard DDR memory.

These are not the only things that should be taken into account when choosing hardware, but they give you a great idea of the performance that you can expect out of your components.
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